RICKS BOTTLE ROOM.COM

~ ALWAYS IN PURSUIT OF GREAT GLASS ~ © 2007 ~

 

 ASSORTED BOTTLES & STUFF                                                                                                                 #6

SOME ASSORTED BOTTLES ECT, HAVE A LOT MORE TO ADD HERE AS TIME PERMITS, BELOW IS MY NOS TIN SIGN FROM RUTTER'S GINGER ALE. ALWAYS LOOKING FOR MORE

    

PONTILED FOOTED BASE NAVAL FLASK W/RIGAREE


 
 

 

                        REMINGTON U.M.C. GUN OIL                                         S.S.WHITE DENTAL MERCURY
 

 

   ONE OF MY GUN OIL BOTTLES,REM~OIL REMINGTON UMC POWDER SOLVENT LUBRICANT AND RUST PREVENTATIVE .HAVE A SAVAGE ARMS AS WELL JUST GOTTA DIG IT OUT. THESE ARE VERY COLLECTABLE BOTTLES,ACTUALLY THERE ARE NOT MANY BIM EMBOSSED GUN RELATED BOTTLES THAT AREN'T.

 

 

 

 MY 3 1/2 INCH 1 POUND S.S. WHITE DENTAL RE-DISTILLED MERCURY STONEWARE,A FAVORITE OF MINE

 MOST MERCURY USES HAVE LONG SINCE BEEN BANNED,LOOK AT MY INFORMATION PAGE AND  THERE IS A LIST OF SOME OF THE USES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remington was founded in 1816 by Eliphalet Remington in Ilion, New York, as E. Remington and Sons. It is the oldest company in the United States which still makes its original product, and is the oldest continuously operating manufacturer in North America. It is the only US company which produces both firearms and ammunition domestically, and is the largest US producer of shotguns and rifles. After a 12 year absence in the handgun market Remington announced April, 2010 the Model 1911 R1, slated to be available through select independent dealers beginning June, 2010. The last handgun produced by Remington Arms, the Model XP-100R, ceased production in 1998. Its products are distributed in over 60 foreign countries, making its base wider than those of its competitors. Remington has also developed or adopted more cartridges than any other gun maker or ammunition manufacturer in the world.

 

 Samuel Stockton White (1822-1879) was a Philadelphia dentist who in the mid 1840s began manufacturing porcelain teeth using feldspar. White gradually abandoned his practice for the manufacture of teeth, dental instruments and supplies. His porcelain teeth won the highest award at the Crystal Palace Exposition in London in 1851 and again at the Philadelphia Centennial of 1876. By the mid nineteenth century the S.S. White Company had become the largest manufacturer of dental instruments in the world. Branch offices for the sale of the firm's products were opened in New York (1846), Boston (1850), Brooklyn (1852), Chicago (1858), Atlanta (1891), Rochester (1897), New Orleans, Cincinnati, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Nashville, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Peoria, and Omaha. Branches were established abroad in Berlin (1897), St. Petersburg (1899), Toronto, London, Paris, Japan, and Australia. In 1881 the firm was incorporated, changing its name from the S.S. White Co. to the S.S. White Dental Manufacturing Co. The extensive plant of Johnston Bros., on Staten Island, New York, was acquired; it produced a large portion of the products marketed by the firm. The manufacture of teeth was discontinued in 1937. This company was the first to produce the all-metal dental chair, a flexible shaft engine, certain filling products, and precision steel instruments. It published the pioneering periodical, THE DENTAL COSMOS, from 1859 to 1936 (© SMITHSONIAN)

 

                                                               WINCHESTER GUN OIL ~ WINCHESTER ARMS

The ancestor of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company was the Horace Smith and Daniel Wesson partnership of Norwich, Connecticut (not to be confused with the famous Smith & Wesson Revolver Company founded later by the same men). Smith & Wesson acquired Lewis Jennings' improved version of inventor Walter Hunt's 1848 "Volition Repeating Rifle" and its caseless "Rocket Ball" ammunition, which had been produced in small numbers by Robbins & Lawrence of Windsor, Vermont. Jennings' rifle was a commercial failure, and Robbins & Lawrence ceased production in 1852.Smith designed a much-improved rifle based on Jennings', and the partners also hired away Robbins & Lawrence shop foreman Benjamin Tyler Henry. In 1855 the Smith & Wesson partnership, in order to manufacture what they called the "Volcanic" lever-action rifle and pistol, sought investors and incorporated as the Volcanic Repeating Arms Company. Its largest stockholder was clothing manufacturer Oliver Winchester.

  
The Volcanic rifle had only limited success. The company moved to New Haven (without Smith or Wesson) in 1856, but by the end of that year became insolvent. Oliver Winchester and his partner John M. Davies purchased the bankrupt firm's assets from the remaining stockholders, and reorganized it as the New Haven Arms Company in April 1857.

After Smith's departure Benjamin Henry continued to work with a Smith development project, the self-contained metallic rimfire cartridge, and perfected the much larger, more powerful .44 Henry round. Henry also supervised a new rifle design based loosely on the Volcanic to use the new ammunition, retaining only the general form of the breech mechanism and the tubular magazine. This became the Henry rifle of 1860, which was manufactured by the New Haven Arms Company, and used in considerable numbers by certain Union army units in the American Civil War. The Henry rifle ensured New Haven Arms' success, and together with the Spencer rifle established the lever-action repeater in the firearms market.

The "Winchester" Rifle

In 1866 Benjamin Henry, angered over what he believed was inadequate compensation, attempted to have the Connecticut legislature award ownership of New Haven Arms to him. Oliver Winchester, hastening back from Europe, forestalled the move and reorganized New Haven Arms yet again as the Winchester Repeating Arms Company.Winchester had the basic design of the Henry rifle completely modified and improved to become the first Winchester rifle, the Model 1866, which fired the same .44 caliber rimfire cartridges as the Henry but had an improved magazine (with the addition of a loading gate on the right side of the receiver, invented by Winchester employee Nelson King) and, for the first time, a wooden forearm. The Henry and the 1866 Winchester shared a unique double firing pin which struck the head of the rimfire cartridge in two places when the weapon was fired, increasing the chances that the fulminate in the hollow rim would ignite the 28 or so grains of black powder inside the case.

Another extremely popular model was rolled out in 1873. The Model 1873 introduced the first Winchester center fire cartridge, the .44-40 WCF (Winchester Center Fire). These rifle families are commonly known as the "Gun That Won the West."

The Model 1873 was followed by the Model 1876 (or "Centennial Model"), a larger version of the '73, which utilized the same toggle-link action and brass cartridge elevator dating from the Henry. It was chambered for longer, more powerful cartridges such as .45-60 WCF, .45-75 WCF, and .50-95 WCF. The action was not long enough to allow Winchester to achieve their goal of producing a repeating rifle capable of handling the .45-70 Government cartridge; this would not happen until they began manufacture of the Browning-designed Model 1886.

Oliver Winchester died in December 1880; his son and successor, William Wirt Winchester, died of tuberculosis four months later.

From 1883, John Browning worked in partnership with the Winchester Repeating Arms Company and designed a series of rifles and shotguns, most notably the Winchester Model 1885 Single Shot, Winchester Model 1887 lever-action shotgun, Model 1897 pump-action shotgun; and the lever-action Model 1886, Model 1892, Model 1894 and Model 1895 rifles.
      JOHN CORRY SEAL, PHILADELPHIA ~ THE GERMAN BREWING CO.{ QUEEN CITY BREWING CO.}

ON THE LEFT MY RECENT BUY, AMERICAN SEAL BOTTLE FROM JOHN CORRY PHILADELPHIA DATING TO 1840-50S RANGE.

HERE  IS A HEAVY EMBOSSED CROWN FROM MARYLAND, HEAVY EMBOSSED!!! THE GERMAN BREWING CO. CUMBERLAND MARYLAND

THE GERMAN BREWING CO. 

The Queen City Brewing Company opened in 1901 as The German Brewing Company. Cumberland at that time was of a huge German descent, and the market for a well  brewed German beer was wanted for the city. The German Brewing Co. acquired an expeirienced brewmaster from Germany, and the brewery was under way.

At the outbreak of World War I, the directors thought the name would offend the American people, so the name and brand were changed to Queeno. At the end of the war, the names were changed back.

The German Brewing Company prospered until Prohibition. During this period, the brewery remained operational by making a near beer, selling ice, and making soft drinks. At the repeal of Prohibition, the brewery prospered again, only to be inundated by the St. Patricks Day Flood of 1936. After the cleanup, the brewery again prospered. Old German Brand Beer was again being brewed in the city.  At the start of World War II, as not to offend the American people, the brewery name and brand were changed again. This time to The Queen City Brewing Co, brewers of The Original Queen City Beer. At the end of the war, the brand name was changed back, but the Company name remained the same. The Queen City Brewing Co. prospered greatly during the 50's and 60's, brewing their flagship Old German, as well as Fischers Beer and Ale and Kings XX Ale.

In the 1950's, the brewery purchased The Cumberland Brewing Co, brewers of Old Export Brand Beer. Both breweries operated independently. Other brands brewed by Queen City in the 50's and 60,s included Goldcrest 51, a brew purchased after the closing of The Tennesee Brewing Co.  In April, 1969, the Directors decided to close The Cumberland Brewing Co and transfer the Old Export Brands to Queen City. The brewery continued to prosper during these years by brewing such brands as Gamecock Cream Ale, Gamecock Premium Beer, Tudor Beer and Ale(for A&P Market), Brown Derby(Safeway Brand), Old Dutch, Arrow, Heritage House, Richbrau, Queens Brau, American, and Old Export.

Labor disputes and lack of sales caused the Queen City Brewing Company to close its doors in December of 1974, thus transferring its Old German, Old Export, Heritage House, Old Dutch, Brown Derby, and American brands to the Pittsburgh Brewing Company of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Queen City brewery was demolished in April, 1975, ending a combined 152 years of brewing in Cumberland Maryland.

                       COCA ~ MARIANI  & CO. NEW YORK                  PONTILED OLIVE~AMBER WHISKEY

 

 

 1870'S COCA MARIANI WINE TONIC, ORIGINALY TOUTED CONTAINING COCAINE,AND DID IN SMALL AMOUNTS. UNTIL THE 1906 FOOD AND DRUG ACT, THEN THEY TOUTED HOW IT DID'NT !!

A SUPER NICE,VERY CLEAN,WHITTLED OLIVE AMBER PONTILED WHISKEY CYLINDER DATING TOO THE EARLY PART OF THE 1800'S.

            DIAMOND & LATTICE POISON  ~  W.T. COMPANY 1896       AMAZING COLOR HOCK WINE

  I HAD PUT TOGETHER 17 DIAMOND AND LATTICE POISONS (SEE BOTTOM OF PAGE) AND THEN DECIDED TOO GO INTO BLOBS AND INKS AND TRADED OFF FOR THOSE. I DID HAVE TO KEEP A COUPLE THOUGH.

ON THE RIGHT IS A 14 INCH TALL AMAZING COLORED HOCK WINE BOTTLE I JUST DUG UP, SEEN THESE IN A FEW COLOR VARIANTS INCLUDING AMBER'S,GREEN AND TEALS....BUT NEVER THIS COLOR.BIM AND DATED TO LATE 1800'S

The Whitall Tatum Company  In 1806, a man named James Lee opened a glassworks factory in Millville, New Jersey. This glassworks, located on Buck Street in the town of Millville, was later owned by the Whitall Tatum Company. Whitall Tatum would have fourteen owners over the first seventy-five years of its existence.Whitall Tatum, was the first glass factory in America. It operated from the early 1800s through 1938, located in Millville, NJ. The location was ideal for making glass because silica-based sand is plentiful in southern New Jersey, the Maurice River flowing through Millville provided a source of water, and plentiful forests provided energy for industrial processes. The Millville glass works was started in 1806 by James Lee and went through several changes of ownership. In 1838, John M Whitall became a partner in the business. He lived in Philadelphia and worked at the company's headquarters there. In 1845 after his brother Israel Franklin Whitall joined, the firm became Whitall, Brother & Company. Later, Edward Tatum also joined the partnership and in 1857 the name was again changed to Whitall Tatum & Company 

 WHITALL TATUM COMPANY
LETTERED PRESCRIPTION BOTTLES Handsome lettering adds greatly to the brilliancy and general appearance of a wellmade Prescription Bottle.It shows the public that the druggist whose name is blown in the glass has a prescription business important enough to warrant him in having bottles made especially for himself, and in considerable quantities.It is a proof of the dispenser's confidence and pride in his work, and gives the impression of care and thoroughness in every detail. WHITALL TATUM COMPANY MANUFACTURERS OF DRUGGISTS', CHEMISTS' AND PERFUMERS' GLASSWARE Manufacturers, Importers and Jobbers of DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES
 

 

                                            JOHN LAMONT ~ BARRETT & COMPANY     PATENT BOTTLE

JOHN LAMONT PATENT BOTTLE WITH BARRETT AND CO. LONDON AS CUSTOMER,EVEN THOUGH LAMONT HAS MOST OF THE SPACE OCCUPIED!!! THESE ARE GETTING PRETTY HARD TOO COME BY,DATING TO LATER PART OF 1800'S THERE IS THE FIST HOLDING A BOTTLE ON FRONT AND A PICTURED LAMONT BOTTLE ON REVERSE WITH PATENT DOWN CENTER.

JOHN LAMONT PATENTED IN 1876 HIS INTERNAL LEDGE MOUTHED BOTTLE WITH WOOD STOPPER (LATER CHANGED TOO GLASS) THE DETAIL .OF THE INVENTION CONSISTED IN FORMING THE INTERNAL NECK WITH A NARROW FLANGE AGAINST WHAT THE RING ON STOPPER PRESSES AGAINST SEALING THE CONTENTS. THE WOODEN BULLET STOPPER WAS PATENTED IN 1888 BUT REQUIRED A SPECIAL TOOL TOO REPLACE THE RUBBER SEAL WHEN IT FAILED,A TIME CONSUMING TASK. THEY WERE VERY POPULAR PARTICULARLY AFTER 1890 WHEN THE PATENT LAPSED AS THEY WERE CHEAP TOO PRODUCE.  LAMONT BOTTLES CONTINUED TO BE USED UNTIL 1910 RANGE. THEY HAVE BECOME VERY COLLECTABLE.

 

  THEN THE SCREW CAP !!!!!

A distinct feature which is an enormous advance on the preceding form of stopper, and which, from the fact of their being forced into the bottle in order to get at its contents, have been called "internal stoppers," is the patent screw stopper of Barrett and Elers, and the intermittent screw stopper of Barnett and Foster. Barrett's stoppers are made of ebonite tube, the thread being made by moulding the tube when softened by heat; the stoppering is rendered tight by an india-rubber washer. Mr. Barrett has kindly sent a variety of beverages bottled and corked according to his system, and also a variety of bottles and stoppers showing the growth of the new method of corking. We have, first, the somewhat barbarous looking "Jersey wood stopper," which, however convenient in use, can lay no claim to elegance or neatness; secondly, we have the ebonite stopper, which in turn was substituted for the glass ball stopper; lastly, we come to the screw stopper, which, although it was originally introduced for bottled beers, bids fair to supersede every other form of this kind of stopper for aerated waters. There is a great difference of opinion respecting the merits of the old and familiar method of corking, and the use of the patent stoppers. I have no hesitation in saying that the driving of the stopper into the contents of the bottle is very objectionable, it promotes a rapid evolution of gas, and what is still worse, any dust or particles of straw contained in the neck of the bottle find their wayinto the tumbler when the contents are poured out. A metal capsule would remove the last objection. This system of corking has, in spite of all that can be urged against it, been the means of developing a taste for these beverages among our artisans and the less wealthy of the middle class, and has no doubt stimulated the demand for waters where cork is used. I am indebted to Messrs. Hayward Tyler and Co. for this display of bottles, designed by Lamont, and others, for their well-known system of corking. Messrs. Barnett and Foster have also sent Codd's patent bottles. The fact that the screw stopper can be quickly replaced when a portion of the contents of the bottle has been poured out, adds very materially to its merit, the water retaining enough gas to bear opening a second time in a satisfactory state of aeration.

 

                             N.Y. STONEWARE CO.   FORT EDWARD N.Y  ~    KNAPPS ROOT BEER EXTRACT

I DUG THIS DECORATED 1 GALLON N.Y. STONEWARE JUG OUT BEHIND MY HOUSE IN THE BACKGROUNDS UNDER THE CUSTOM UMBRELLAS AND PATIO FURNITURE ABOUT AN 1/8 MILE IN, VERY COOL FIND. 

NICE KNAPP ROOT BEER EXTRACT I DUG RECENTLY, COOL BOTTLE. 

 N.Y. STONEWARE CO. FORT EDWARD N.Y.

The manufacture of stoneware was a major industry in Fort Edward beginning in 1858. Otto Lewis was the first potter to locate here with many firms being formed soon after. George Satterlee opened the Fort Edward Pottery Co. in 1859. Michael Mory joined the firm in 1861 to form Satterlee and Mory. J. A. & C. W. Underwood ran a pottery firm, which opened in 1865 and closed in 1867. Haxstun, Ottman & Co. ran it from 1867 to 1872 on the site of the former Underwood Pottery. In 1872, Haxstun withdrew from Ottman and the firm became known as Ottman Brothers.

In 1875, a pottery opened on the corner of Broadway and Argyle Street under the ownership of Haxstun and Company. Later it was purchased by the Tilford Brothers, who were succeeded by George S. Guy. The Fort Edward Stoneware Association was formed in February of 1883 by a group of pottery manufacturers. In 1892, the Hilfinger Brothers purchased the Guy Pottery, which was to remain in operation until 1941. Unlike the former stoneware manufactures, the Hilfinger produced earthenware pottery from native clay

Fort Edward stoneware was produced by several local firms from 1858 until the 1940s. The large glazed crocks, jugs and other vessels often featuring cobalt decoration and a brown glazed interior are highly sought after collector's items today 

 

 

 

 

 SOME EARLY KNAPPS AD'S

 

 

 

                                                                    MID 1800'S BEERS & WHISKEY'S

                    WARNER'S SAFE KIDNEY & LIVER CURE                                               ROCHESTER ~ N.Y.

WARNERS SAFE KIDNEY & LIVER CURE,DON'T DIG AS MANY IN THIS AREA AS YOU USED TOO. FOUND IN MANY VARIANTS, THE GREENS AND OPPOSITE SWINGING DOOR ECT. STILL ACOOL BOTTLE BUT NOT VERY HARD TO GET IN THIS VARIANT.

WARNER'S SAFE KIDNEY & LIVER CURE

Disease is an effect, not a cause. Its origin Ib within; its manifestations without. Hence, to cure the disease the cause must be removed, and in no other way can a cure ever be effected Warner's SAFE Cure is established on just this principle. It realizes that  95 PER CENT. of all diseases arise from deranged Kidneys and Liver, and it strikes at once at the root of the difficulty. The elements of which it Is composed act directly upon these great organs, both as a food and restorer, and, by placing them in a healthy condition, drive disease and pain from the system. For the innumerable troubles caused by unhealthy Kidneys, Liver and Urinary Organs; for the distressing Disorders of Women; for all Nervous Affections, and physical derangements generally, this great remedy has no equal. Its st record Is a guarantee of continued per

WARNER'S SAFE CURE CO.

Warner's Safe Cure Co., Lake Ave. & White St.—Prop. Meds  Price Per Doz.

Warner's Safe Cure For the Kidneys and Liver .  Warner's SAFE Cure—Large $S.OO

Warner's SAFE Cure—Small 4.00

Warner's SAFE Diabetes Cure.. ..10.00 Warner's SAFE Rheumatic Cure. 10.00

Warners SAFE Asthma Cure 5.C0

Warnor's SAFE Nervine—Large... 7.00 Warner's SAFE Nervine—Small... 8.75 Warner's SAFE Pills 1.40

A Matter Which Concerns You.

Below will be found a sample of the multitude of letters of encouragement Messrs. H. H. W'arner & Co., of Rochester, N. Y., daily receive. The subjoined unsollcited testimonials are from your friends and neighbors, ladles and gentlemen you know and esteem for their honor and straightforwardness, and who would scorn to be a party to any deception. What has been done for others can be done for you. and It is folly, nay suicidal, to longer suffer when the means of recovery He at your very door:

Saratoga Springs, N.y. Dec. 17, 1887—Seven years have now passed since I was perfectly cured by " Warners Safe Cure" of a most painful and severe form of Chronic Kidney Disease which had been present for fifteen years. I was unable to lieur the Intense pain, and consequently used morphine until my limbs were a mass of scars, made by the instrument used for injecting it. When I think of my former suffering and my almest hopeless condition, I feel like giving thanks and praise to the remedy, " Warner's Safe Cure," that restored me to health and happiness. During the past seven years I have had no return of my former troubles, and I desire to say most emphatically that I regard " Warner's Safe Cure " as a never-falling panacea fer kidney difficulties, acute or chronic. My cure is permanent and I am to-day sound and well. 

 

 THESE ARE FROM THE 1860S AND ARE SOME I DUG AT THE AGE OF 14 IN UPSTATE NY,I HAVE QUITE A FEW AND GRAB MORE WHEN I CAN. I THINK THEY HAVE ALOT OF CLASS. EACH ONE IS DIFFERENT EVEN IN THE SAME VARIANT LINES

Thomas McMullen & Co., against the decision of the collector of customs at New York, X. Y., as to the rate and amount of duties chargeable on certain merchandise, imported per the vessels and entered on the dates specified in the schedule. Opinion by Somerville, General Appraiser.

The merchandise covered by the protests consists of ale bottles of common colored glass, holding not more than one pint and bearing the inscription "Thos. McMullen & Co.'s White Label." This inscription is shown by the testimony to be produced by the impulsion of sand, through machine power, against the surface of the bottles, the process being known as sand blasting. This process was held by the Board in re Witteman (G. A. 4054) to be different from the processes of etching, engraving, and cutting. The testimony in this case satisfactorily sustains that finding of fact.

These bottles were classified and assessed for duty by the collector at the rate of 11 cents per pound, under paragraph 99 of the tariff act of 1897, as "plain green or colored, molded or pressed, * * * glass bottles, * * * holding not more than one pint and not less than one-fourth of a pint." They are claimed by the importers to be subject to duty at 45 per cent ad valorem, under paragraph 112, as manufactures of glass, or under paragraph 100, which, so far as it pertains to the question under consideration, reads as follows:

100. Glass bottles, decanters, or other vessels or articles of glass, cut, engraved, painted, colored, stained, silvered, gilded, etched, frosted, printed in any manner or otherwise ornamented, decorated, or ground (except snch grinding as is necessary for fitting stoppers), * * * sixty per centum ad valorem.  December 22, 1899.

                  DOBLER, ALBANY NY                                                                                            QUANDT, TROY NY

 COUPLE LOCAL BREWER TRAYS~ LEFT IS DOBLER,ALBANY NEW YORK & RIGHT IS QUANDT BREWERS,TROY NEW YORK

 

             GREAT BEAR SPRING WATER, 5 GALLON IN CASE                 NATHANIAL HUDSON,GALWAY NY

5 GALLON EMBOSSED GREAT BEAR SPRING CO. WITH ORIGINAL CRATE

NATHANIAL HUDSON 2 QUART CROCK , GALWAY VILLAGE N.Y.

 The Legend of the Great Bear
According to Native American legend, a young brave - some say the father of Hiawatha - was attacked here by a large bear. Whether the brave was attacked while drinking from the springs or drank from the springs in thirst from his exhausting struggle, upon vanquishing the bear the brave named the springs "Mishemokwa", meaning great bear, in honor of his victory. The springs have been called "Great Bear" ever since.

 
Facts and History of the Great Bear Springs

    The area known as Great Bear Springs is comprised of 236 acres owned by the City of Fulton and the 78 acre Town of Volney Park.
    Great Bear Springs has been a source of spring water for over 200 years and became the primary source of water for the City of Fulton in 1970.
    Beginning in 1885 several companies derived water from the Great Bear Springs for commercial purposes: Fulton Water Works Company (1885); Great Bear Spring Company (1888) bottled water from the Great Bear Springs for distribution throughout the Northeast; and the Pure Water Supply Company (1890) distributed bottled water primarily in Syracuse. Several ruins of former wells and pump houses can be seen in the southeast quadrant. Although the water now comes from other sources, the Great Bear brand still exists today, owned by Nestle.
    The property also contains the historical Hinsmanville Lock and tow path that were a part of the original Oswego River Canal. The Hinsmanville Lock was one of eighteen locks between the Erie Canal in Syracuse and Lake Ontario and was in use from 1828 until 1917 when the four foot deep canal was refurbished and dreged to accomodate larger engine-powered barges. The deeper canal reduced the number of locks to nine and the Hinsmanville Lock was abandoned. Copyright © 2008-2012 Friends of Great Bear,

 

                    PROTONUCLEIN                                                                                                  PEPSIKOLA TABLETS

 I HAVE A COUPLE OF THESE TINY GROUND MOUTH PROTONUCLEIN BOTTLES WITH THEIR UNIQUE SHAPE AND THEY DATE TOO 1900,S RANGE.1+ INCHES IS ALL AND WITH THE ORIGINAL CAP A REAL NEAT BOTTLE.

 

THIS IS A SCARCE 1890,S BLOWN 1+ INCH TALL  PEPSIKOLA TABLETS BOTTLE. THIS IS NOT PEPSI COLA AND WAS EVENTUALLY SHUT DOWN FOR PATENT ISSUES I'M TOLD,A SCARCE AND VERY COLLECTABLE BOTTLE IN MINT CONDITION.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                    GRANDPAS WHISKEY                    TRAGERS WHISKEY                   OLD GAELIC WHISKEY

 FAR LEFT; GRANDPA'S WHISKEY I DUG THIS RECENTLY AND IS BLOWN IN MOLD DATING TO 1890-1900 RANGE, NEXT IS A REAL CLEAN NICE COLOR PRETTY COMMON I.TRAGERS CINCINNATI OHIO ALSO 1890S RANGE AND ON THE RIGHT IS VERY CRUDE 1860-70S 3 PART MOLD WHISKEY IN GREAT CONDITION AND BASE EMBOSSED. GAELIC OLD SMUGGLER SCOTCH.

 

                                LYSOL IRREGULAR HEX                                                                       GERMANY

 PRETTY SCARCE GERMAN IRREGULAR HEX LYSOL POISON WITH PORCELAIN STOPPER,I LUCKED INTO 20 YRS.AGO YOU DO NOT SEE THESE COME UP VERY OFTEN AND ALMOST NEVER WITH ANY OF THE STOPPER PARTS. I HAVE BOUGHT,TRADED AND SOLD ALOT OF POISON BOTTLES OVER THE YEARS BUT THIS ONE I ALWAYS KEEP.

Referring to a report from Germany, where a Mr. Fulde has cured foul brood by means of a new disinfectant, lysol. Dr. C. D. Miller asked in Gleanings, page88. "What's lysol? and will It work as well in the English language as in the German?" The editor remarks thereon: "I should be interested, also. In knowing whether the disease stayed away. Perhaps Mr. Uravenhorst will answer the question."Yes, I will answer the question according to the best Information I can get. I have not tried lysol, because I did not know of It before September of last year. The new disinfectant has been manufactured for a few years by Schiilke & Mayr, at Hamburg, Germany. They produced it from coaltar. It has a brown color, and smells like tar. In Germany It is to be had In every drugstore, and perhaps in America also. Mr. Fulde purchased a bottle of lysol for 2j£ cents, and therewith cured his bees, which were badly infected with foul brood. He took ten pounds of sugarsyrup, boiled and skimmed it, and mixed it up with 24 drops of lysol and 4 drops of carbolic acid. He gave a colony a soup-plate full of this food. After three days he found the sick larvae dry in their cells, and In a lapse of three weeks not a trace of foul brood was to be found In his colonies. They were sound, and did swarm. Later he has fed lysol in the same way, particularly In the spring, to protect his bees against foul brood. He never saw a trace of it again. That's all I know about lysol. I hope some of the German and American bee-keepers will try the new disinfectant. It would be a great benefit to bee-keeping if lysol should prove to be a remedy for such a rapidly spreading disease as foul brood. Then it would be a trifle for every one to cure the malady himself. However, I confess that I do not have such confidence in lysol as Mr. Fulde has. Experienced bee-keepers in Germany, and I myself, too, are of the oplpion that the disease will disappear, oftentimes, without any cure other than a good honey-flow, when good sound honey is coming in, and that most of the remedies tried in such cases did not cure foul brood at all. The good honey-flow only, did it, nothing more. Hundreds of remedies have been recommended, but, when tried, they would not work as was claimed. May be that, in one or the other case, the remedy was not used as 11 should have been; but I think most of the recommended remedies are worthless, and rest upon illusion. On account of the importance of the matter, it may not be out of the way to report concernIng a disinfectant that I have used nearly twenty years, with such results, that, for my part, I hold the foul brood question as fully solved. I have had to fight hard against foul brood, as I resided In Brunswick, and, later,, here in Wilsnack; but I have never lost one colony by It. I had to guard my apiaries against neighboring bees infected with foul brood, in apiaries only a thousand paces, or less than half a mile, distant. Well, it was a very bad position for myself; but I have fought it out. In a few cases, where the neighboring apiaries were lost by foul brood, I have found iu some of my hives slight traces of the disease. However, they disappeared swiftly by my treatment. I used, and have used till to-day, although I have not at present any apiaries near by that are Infected with foul brood, carbolic acid—not the refined article you get at the drugstore Iu the shape of white crystals, but black and unrefined carbolic acid, which Is intermingled with coal-tar, and mostly used as paint. Refined carbolic acid is too strong, and the sanative power of the tar Is absent In it. I am of the opinion that just the tar, in connection with the carbolic acid, has much to do In the cure of foul brood, as Dr. Preuss said. He was the first bee-keeper who studied foul brood.

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HICKS CAPUDINE ~ RALEIGH, N.C.

NOT A RARE BOTTLE BUT HAD ALOT OF QUESTIONS ABOUT IT SO HERE IS ONE I DUG, THE OLDER VARIANT THAN THE  OVAL WITH JUST "HEADACHE CURE"
 
 
 
HICKS CAPUDINE

A great many inquiries reach the Association's laboratory regarding various nostrums and "patent medicines" with requests for analyses, but the number of preparations thus brought to notice is so great that it would take an army of chemists to satisfy all inquiries. As it is, only such preparations are examined as will serve as examples of a class of nostrums which it is desired to expose or that are of special interest to the profession. Hick's Capudine Cure—or as it is known to physicians "Elixir Capu-Hicks"—is one of such examples, and its investigation has been deemed advisable.

Manufacturers' Claims

The manufacturers — the Capudine Chemical Company, Raleigh, N. C.—issue two kinds of advertising pamphlets—one for physicians and another for the public. The medical profession is told that Capudine is especially recommended for the relief of all headaches, colds, la grippe, neuralgia, sick headache, nervous headache, acidity, flatulence, and Indigestion pains, also for dysmenorrhea, after pains, etc.

A formula of the type that usually accompanies preparations of this character is .given:

Elixir Capu Is composed of the combined Bromides of Potassium. Sodium and Ammonium, CafTeln. Capu, Elixir Peppermint, Adjutants and Correctives, Syrup and water, q. s.

To elucidate further and for the information of those who have never heard of the substance capu, we are told: Capu Is a cellulin product—Chemical formula Chjtmnjo, possessing very powerful analgesic properties and is a mild antipyretic.

In a "Laundry List" pamphlet extolling the virtues of the remedy, the public arc informed that Hicks- Capudine CURES all headaches, Indigestion, la grippe, colds, etc. No remedy ever placed before a suffering mortal has the wonder fully quick powers of Capudine.

Hicks' Capudine is not a "dope"; will not produce a habit. Try this splendid remedy and enjoy life once more. Capudine is a liquid, acts immediately and is sold by dose at soda founts, and In 10, 25 and 00c bottles at drug stores.

LABORATORY FINDINGS

Capudine (whether in the form of Elixir Capu-Hicks, or as Hicks' Capudine Cure) is a brown, -rather syrupy liquid, slightly alkaline to litmus, with an aromatic odor and a salty taste. Besides 8 per cent, of alcohol, Capudine was found to contain sugar, aromatics, chlorids, calfein, antipyrin and salicylates. Quantitative estimations demonstrated the presence of about 1.25 gm. (10 grains) of antipyrin and caffein to each fluid ounce, and salicylates equivalent to about 0.9 gm. (14 grains) of salicylic acid to each fluid ounce. Thus Capudine depends for its action principally on antipyrin.

COMMENTS

As a barefaced attempt to exploit, at the same time and with the same preparation, both the medical profession and the public, this nostrum is probably preeminent in the annals of the "patent medicine" business—a business whose claims to deceit and mendacity are already high. That medical journals should aid and abet such methods would Beem unbelievable. Testimonials are forthcoming, of course. In the pamphlet to the laity, these come from the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker, while in the "literature" to physicians, at least some of the testimonials—"case histories," if you please! —come, it is needless to say, from our old testimonio-maniac friend, W. T. Marrs, M.D., of Peoria Heights, 111. As Dr. Marrs has recommended, at various stages of his literary career, such remedies as Neurilla, Antikamnia, Bromidia, Chionia, Arsenaiiro, Cactina Fillets, Thialion, Phenoseptine, Papine, Calcidin and others too numerous to mention, his opinion regarding Capudinc must be considered authoritative. Dr. A. S. Reed of Naples, Maine, also details a "case history" in which the marvelous results achieved by the administration of Capudine are surpassed only by the still more marvelous spelling and composition of the testimonial.

In the lay press we find Capudine extensively advertised in the typical "patent medicine" style. In the "Laundry List" pamphlet, previously referred to, which goes direct to the public, there are graphically portrayed some of the conditions in which Capudine is indicated.

For the purpose of determining the attitude of the Capudine Chemical Company regarding its policy of combining the "patent medicine" and "ethical proprietary" business in one and the same preparation, a Chicago physician wrote, asking if it made any particular difference whether he wrote a prescription for Elixir Capu-Hicks or told his patients to go to the drug store and ask for a bottle of Hicks Capudine Cure. The Capudine Chemical Company rose gracefully to the bait and swallowed it hook and line. The answer, dated Sept. 28, 190'ri, is so ingenuous and enlightening that we give it almost in full. For the purpose of emphasizing certain passages we have employed italics and small capitals:

"We use the name Elixir Capu-Hicks so that Doctors can write for it and have their prescriptions filled without the consumer knowing that it is the same thing as the advertised product. A great many of our doctor friends prefer this.

THE DOSE OVER THE COUNTER AND ELIXIR CAPU-HICKS ON

PRESCRIPTION FROM THE SAME ONE-PINT OR ONE-GALLON

Though some of our drug friends buy it labeled as Elixir

BOTTLE OF CAPUDINE. WHICH IS PERFECTLY ALL RIGHT [! !].

Capu-Hicks specially for their prescription trade."

"Perfectly all right" indeed! What though you deceive your patient, stultify yourself and use your druggist as a catspaw; just so you increase the sale of Capudine it "is perfectly all right"—for the Capudine Chemical Company.

The formula furnished physicians is, of course, a joke. The various ingredients given—without quantities—are, with the exceptions of Capu, well-known drugs. Capu is not so well known; in fact, its circle of acquaintances is limited to the Capudine Chemical Company. According to the company (and if it doesn't know, who does?) "capu is a cellulin product— chemical formula Cuhjonjo,." This looks abstruse and scientific, and doubtless in many cases prevents further impertinent and awkward questions. The description only lacks one thing to prevent it qualifying for an honored position in the hall of fakes—a "structural formula" of weird and impressive design. The great unknown—Capu—is, of course, as the analysis demonstrates, our old friend antipyrin. On the "literature" furnished physicians and on the advertising distributed to the public, great stress is laid on the fact that Capudine "contains no acetanilid." This puts the nostrum in that dangerous class

Covington. Ga.. September 14.—The sudden death of. Mrs. Joe Win-burn, at Mansfield yesterday, was due to an overdose of capudine for , periodical Wadaches. She was the wife of Rev. Joe-: Wlflburn. Baptist pastor .at Mansfield, and leaves five small children

Reproduction from the Atlanta (Ga.) Constitution, Sept. 15, 1908, which Rives the lie direct to the statement that Capudine "does not contain poisonous drugs."

of "patent medicines," increasingly common of late, in which a heart-depressing drug is present, but one. Unfortunately, which the Food and Drugs Act does not require to be specifically named on the label. Mr. Adams, in the "Great American Fraud" series says, in speaking of the labels on "patent medicines:" "If the words 'warranted harmless' appear anywhere, look twice over for the Ethiopian in the woodpile." We would say if the words "contains no acetanilid" appear on the label of any "headache cure," it is a safe guess that Bome other equally dangerous heart-depressant is there in its place. The statements that (1) "Hicks' Capudine is not a 'dope'"; (2) "does not contain . . . poisonous drugs," and (3) "will not produce a habit," are three separate and distinct falsehoods. As to its "harmlessness," a telegram that appeared in the Atlanta (Ga.) Constitution, which we reproduce, refutes briefly but tragically, this cruel lie. Dr. E. W. ,Warren, of Palatka, Fla., reports the case of a woman who was thought to have been murdered, but the state's attorney concluded that her death was caused by too much Capudine.

And this hybrid "'patent medicine'-proprietary" is to be found advertised in medical journals! How much longer will the medical profession put up with it?
                            GENERAL CHEMICAL CO.                                                      REED & CARNRICK CO.

 A FAVORITE BOTTLE WITH REMOVABLE RIBBED LID FROM THE GENERAL CHEMICAL COMPANY AND DATED TO 1900,S WITH TOOLED LIP. 

GENERAL CHEMICAL COMPANY.

Mr. Bagg, secretary of the General Chemical Company, in the affidavit submitted by him, states that the business of that company is the manufacture of heavy chemicals. The company bought the property of 12 previously existing companies, including 19 separate plants. Three other plants have since been acquired.No promoter was concerned in the organization of the company, and there was no underwriting syndicate. The consolidation was effected entirely by agreement among those engaged in the business. An appraisal committee was formed to determine the fair cash value of the plants taken over. The valuation of the intangible property was based in part upon the net earnings of the several constituent companies for 5$ years before the consolidation. The plants were paid for with securities of the consolidated company, common stock being issued in payment for intangible property, and for some of the plants, which were earning less than 8 per cent per annum net profit. The company was formed because it was hoped that the severity of competition which existed would be done away with, and because of the expectation that economies in production and sale would be effected. Considerable economies have been realized. The greatest gain has been the economy in production, which has been due to the control by the central office of the manufacturing department and of the buying. An appreciable saving in the cost of raw materials is effected through baying for all the plants together. A saving has teen made through the avoidance of cross freights. The number of traveling salesmen is practically the same as before consolidation. It has riot been possible as yet to close any of the plants, but it is expected that some of the smaller and less efficient plants may be closed in the future. The selling price of chemicals has in some cases gone up, but that this has been because of advances in the prices of raw materials. The foreign sales are made on practically the same basis of prices as the domestic sales. The only difference is in the prices charged for packages. Wages have been very generally increased since the formation of the company. The tariff has very little effect upon the business. Competing foreign goods are not likely to be imported under ordinary conditions. Special facilities for transportation, which the company has, make foreign competition practically impossible. The tariff, however, is a safeguard against the sale of surplus stocks in this country by foreign manufacturers. "Mr. Bagg submits a statement made to the stockholders of the General Chemical Company in February, 1901, giving the net profits of the company for the year 1900, the dividends paid, and the surplus account, and the balance sheet of the company, of December 31, 1900, showing the assets and liabilities at that date

 

 TOMBSTONE SHAPED 1880,S BLOWN BOTTLE IN DARK AMBER AND STANDING 7+ INCHES TALL. EMBOSSED REED AND CARNRICK  PHARMCISTS NEW YORK. A HEAVY THICK BOTTLE.

REED & CARNRICK

John Carnrick, of Reed & Carnrick, New York, has done some very meritorious work in the realm of pharmaceutical chemistry. A native of Sand Lake, Rensselaer County, New York, he spent his boyhood in Troy and came to New York at the age of 17. After teaching school for a while he took a course in medicine, but instead of graduating he opened a drug store in Jersey City, and commenced the study of pharmacy and chemistry with a view to improving the palatable qualities of medicines. Thus John Carnrick may be said to be one of the pioneers in the field of what is known as elegant pharmacy.The original drug store was operated by Mr. Carnrick under the name of Gardner & Carnrick. This was afterward changed to Carnrick & Andrus, and subsequently to Reed & Carnrick, a name now famous all over the world. Through all the changes of name it was Mr. Carnrick's genius as a chemist that made the success of the house possible. The preparations which he invented are used to-day by the medical profession in every civilized country on the globe. He has always in the introduction of his preparations to the medical profession given to them every detail of manufacture and invited them to his laboratories to examine every process and manipulation, and has always insisted that their introduction should be in the hands of the medical profession. Mr. Carnrick claims the honor of having introduced elixirs as a class of pharmaceutical products over thirty years ago. Among a few of the principal preparations he introduced are Lactopeptine, Maltine, Peptonoids, Peptenzyme, Protonuclein and Soluble Food. One feature of Mr. Carnrick's business method has been the organization of several companies to carry on the sale of his various discoveries. Among these are the New York Pharmacal Association, the Maltine Manufacturing Company, and the Arlington Chemical Company. The preparations manufactured by these companies were popularized by Reed & Carnrick. The reason for the success of Reed & Carnrick's preparations is probably that Mr. Carnrick makes it a rule not to put upon the market a preparation of his invention unless it fills a want and is in his belief actually superior to anything of the sort previously discovered. Large fortunes have been made from his discoveries, one man having made from the manufacture of one of these preparations something like $2,000,000, it is said. Mr. Carnrick, though a wealthy man, has not reaped so largely as those to whom he has sold. He lives comfortably in a beautiful home on Park avonne with his family, to whom he is devoted. His place of business is unpretentious. It is located at 428 West Broadway, New York.  FEED YOUR PATIENTS. The^ need a highly nutritious, easily assimilated food. contains besides the nutritive elements of beef, gluten of wheat and nucleo-albumins, the enzymes of the digestive gland. As it does not irritate the stomach, and leaves no residue to enter the intestinal tract, it is indicated in all those conditions where artificial feeding is necessary, and is especially useful in Typhoid Fever, Vomiting of Pregnancy, and Diseases of the Digestive System.

 

                            DANA'S  SARSAPARILLA                                         BARLOW BIG BOTTLE

 

NOT A RARE BOTTLE BUT ALWAYS ENJOY DIGGING THEM,I AM KEEPING THIS ONE AND WOULD LIKE A LABELED EXAMPLE.

 Dana's Sarsaparilla, Kilgore and Wilson, Belfast, 1888 

A year after this trademark was registered, G.C. Kilgore and others organized the Dana Sarsaparilla Company. By 1891 they had built a five-floor factory for $17,000, each floor measuring 26,600 square feet; and were employing 35 people. It was said that Dana's Sarsaparilla "wrought many wonderful cures."

CASES OF INSANITY From the Effects of "LA GRIPPE" Arc Alarmingly Prevalent. S U I C I D E S From the SAME CAUSE Are announced in every paper. Would you bo rid of the awful effect* of La Grippe? There is BUT ONE SURE REMEDY that NEVER FAILS, VIZ. Dana's  Sarsaparilla. We Guarantee to CUBE you or REFUND your money. COULD WE DO MORE? Isn't it worth a trial?

"Beside me, as I write, lie issues of some twenty different 'religious' weeklies, the advertising columns of which are a positive stench in the nostrils of decent, self-respecting people. Let the Woman's Christian Temperance Union officers counsel its members who subscribe for these papers to compel their publishers to omit these advertisements, and if they refuse, let these people discontinue their patronage of the paper. Such measures would very quickly shut out from publicity the majority of these baneful patent medicines. There is vital, important work here for the Woman's Christian Temperance Union—work in a cause which is aiming with far greater danger at the very heart of American homes than the cracking of a bottle of champagne over the hull of a newly launched craft!"  ~  "Far better, ladies, that the contents of a bottle of champagne should go into the water, where it will do no one any harm, than that the contents of a bottle of 'patent medicine,' with 40 per cent of alcohol in it, by volume, should be allowed to go into the system of a child and strike at his very soul, planting the seed of a future drunkard "  In regard to the alcoholic feature of these nostrums he prints the table of percentages given by the Massachusetts State Board

Analyst in Public Document No. 34, as follows:     Per cent of alcohol (by volume).

Lydia Pinkham's Vegetable Compound 20.6  Paine's Celery Compound 21.  Dr. Williams' Vegetable Jaundice Bitters 18.5  Whiskol, "a non-intoxicating stimulant" 28.2  Colden's Liquid Beef Tonic, "recommended for treat-
ment of alcoholic habit" 26.5   Ayer's Sarsaparilla 26.2  Thayer's Compound Extract of Sarsaparilla 21.5  Hood's Sarsaparilla 18.8  Allen's Sarsaparilla 13.5  Dana's Sarsaparilla 13.5  Brown's Sarsaparilla 13.5  Peruna 28.5  Vinol, Wine of Cod-Liver Oil 18.8  Dr. Peters' Kuriko 14.  Carter's Physical Extract 22.  Hooker's Wigwam Tonic 20.7  Hoofland's German Tonic 29.3  Howe's Arabian Tonic, "not a rum drink" 13.2  Jackson's Golden Seal Tonic 19.6  Mensman's Peptonized Beef Tonic 16.5  Parker's Tonic, "purely vegetable" 41.6  Schenck's Seaweed Tonic, "entirely harmless" 19.5  Baxter's Mandrake Bitters 16.5  Boker's Stomach Bitters 42.6  Burdock's Blood Bitters 25.2  Greene's Nervura 17.2  Hartshorn Bitters 22.2  Hoofland's German Bitters, "entirely vegetable" 25.6  Hop Bitters 12.  Hostetter's Stomach Bitters 44.3  Kaufman's Sulphur Bitters, "contains no alcohol" (as a
matter of fact it contains 20.5 per cent of alcohol  and no sulphur) 20.5  Pritana 22.  Richardson's Concentrated Sherry Wine Bitters 47.5  Warner's Safe Tonic Bitters 35.7  Warren's Bilious Bitters 21.5   Faith Whitcomb's Nerve Bitters 20.3

We are informed that the proprietor of "Doctor Pierce's Favorite Prescription" has already commenced suit against the Ladies' Home Journal for the particular mention made of this alcoholic preparation. Mr. Bok is entitled to the sincere thanks and appreciation of the entire medical profession, who, while recognizing the evil he has so emphatically pointed out, are in the very nature of things unable to successfully combat it.

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                                SHARPE & DOHME "SMILING SCULL" POISON, BALTIMORE MARYLAND

I HAD AROUND 300 POISONS AND THEN GOT OUT OF THEM AND WENT INTO INKS AND BLOBS,LOCAL STUFF...THIS I RECENTLY GOT IN TRADE AND JUST FIGURED I WOULD KEEP IT.THIS ONE IS THE ABM VARIANT AND DATES TOO EARLY 1900'S

The firm was established in 1860 at the corner of Howard and Pratt streets, Baltimore-the site of their present plant. From time to time, as the need for more adequate facilities for manufacturing purposes was felt, additional buildings were erected, and in 1892 the entire plant was practically rebuilt, greatly enlarged and completely equipped with the most improved machinery for the manufacture of pharmaceuticals. Their line is large and varied and embraces in addition to Standard Medicinal fluid, Solid and Powdered Extracts, Solume Gelatin and Sugar-Coated Pills. Granular Effervescent Salts, Soluble Hypodermic Tablets, Compressed Tablets. Tablet titurates, Elixirs, Syrups and Cordials, full line of high grade Pepsins ranging digestive power from 1:2000 to 1:2 d including their well-known S. & D. guaranteed standard just twice the standard adopted by the U. S. P., 1890. S. & D. deserve great credit for having generally introduced Porous Hypodermic Tablets, which are unquestionably much more rapidly soluble and therefore better adapted for subcutaneous use than are Compressed Hypodermic Tablets. Ergotole is another S. & D. product which has on merit alone won general professional recognition. This is a palatable liquid form of Ergot 22 times the strength of the official fluid extract, and which we believe can be used hypodermically without causing abscess. It is especially recommended for internal use because of its pleasant taste, small dose and freedom from nauseating properties.

Mr. Louis Dohme, the president of the company, is well known in pharmaceutical and chemical circles. His genial affability and personal magnetism have won for S. & D. a host of warm friends. He continues to be the active general superintendent of the affairs of the company. Mr. Chas. E. Dohme, the vice-president, a thoroughly practical pharmacist and chemist, has charge of the laboratories in Baltimore, and personally supervises the manufacturing departments.

Mr. Ernest Stoffregen, the secretary and treasurer, a good financier and a just, courteous gentleman personally, manages the business department from their general offices at 41 John street, New York. Dr. Alfred Dohme, who is in charge of the analytical department, has enjoyed exceptional educational advantages both fn America and Europe, and personally assays the crude drugs purchased for manufacturing purposes. Each member of S. & D. is a practical man, thoroughly conversant with the most minute details of his department. The Chicago house is in charge of Chas. E. Matthews & Bro.

S. & D. long ago adopted a business policy which alms to protect both the jobber and the retailer in their mutual relations as well as in their business association with the medical profession. Their creed is purity of drugs, excellence and uniformity of product and courteous treatment of their patrons, and on these lines they have developed their large and constantly growing business.

                           VAPO~CRESOLINE                                                                                              COMPANY

 

 MY COLLECTION OF VAPO~CRESOLINE STUFF, THE AQUA BOTTLE WITH NO BUMPS IS FROM 1880S AND VERY RARE.

POISONING BY VAPOCRESOLENE.

BY S. S. ADAMS, M.D.                           Washington, D. C.,

These cases are reported because vapo-cresolene is to be found in a great many houses in which there is a child with a cough. It is sometimes introduced and recommended by the physician. I have seen two cases of carbolic acid poisoning directly attributable to the inhalation of the fumes from a vapocresolene lamp. In one case I was called to see a patient who was said to be dying and the family and physician did not know what was the matter. I found the child, aged one year, in coma, and in a cold, clammy sweat. There was marked pulmonary edema. When I asked what had been done with carbolic acid, I was told that the child had been shut up for twenty-four hours in a small room inhaling the fumes from a vapo-cresolene lamp. I asked the mother: " How long has this child been passing black urine?" and she said it had passed black urine, but had passed no urine for twenty-four hours. The child was taken out in the open air, given water to drink and it recovered.

I was called to see an infant aged six months dying, it was said, from pneumonia. The child had stridulous respiration, mucous rales over both lungs, a cold, clammy sweat, and dilated pupils. The temperature was only a little over one hundred degrees in the rectum, and had been even lower. As I went out of the room I saw a vapo-cresolene lamp burning. Somebody had recommended using the vapo-cresolene lamp and the mother had put it beside the crib at bed-time. At twelve o'clock the child refused its food. At four o'clock the mother was awakened by a peculiar noise the child was making, and it was after this that I was called. This patient did not pass smoky urine. The child was taken into another room, and given plenty of water. The odor of carbolic acid was very perceptible. Usually physicians have attributed no harm to the vapo-cresolene lamp, but I ask for your experiences. Whether the pulmonary edema was due to the congestion of the kidneys or not I am unable to say. This second case also recovered. The pulse and temperature soon became normal and the physician in attendance then said he thought it was a case of " suffocative catarrh." But I do not think there is any doubt about the diagnosis of poisoning by vapo-cresolene.

HEMORRHAGE INTO THE SUPRARENAL CAPSULE IN STILL-BORN CHILDREN AND INFANTS; REPORT OF A CASE SHOWING RUPTURE OF THE SAC AND ESCAPE OF BLOOD INTO THE PERIRENAL TISSUES AND THE PERITONEAL CAVITY.
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                                  PEEKE'S CURE                                                                  HARRY HABER COLOR

 1880'S HARRY D HABER MAGIC HAIR COLORING, THIS COMPANY WE THINK WAS IN THE JOHNSTOWN NEW YORK AREA. THAT SEEM'S TO BE WHERE THE MAJORITY OF THESE TURNUP.Peeke's Cure.—W. H. Peeke, 4 Cedar Street, New York, advertises and sells a "cure for fits." Peeke styles himself "Professor" and has the letters "F.D."— whatever they may mean—after his name. Those who answer Peeke's advertisements are sent a free bottle of his "infallible remedy" and a thirty-two-page pamphlet purporting to discuss epilepsy and its treatment. Peeke seems to be particularly bitter against his competitors and especially against those who, he asserts, have copied his booklet. "None of these rascally quacks," says Peeke, "ixjssess intelligence sufficient to correctly compose ten words of a medical treatise." According to Peeke, the cause of epilepsy is "disharmony of the action of the double nervous system." A full-size bottle of the cure is sold for $3. Peeke claims that his remedy is "absolutely harmless" and that "the tender babe, the delicate woman, the sturdy vigorous man can alike take it."A cursory examination of the nostrum was made in the Association's laboratory. The report follows:"The specimen was a brown solution having a salt-like, bitter taste and an alkaline reaction. Alcohol, alkaloids and iodids were absent. Quantitative tests indicated the presence of bromin and ammonia equivalent to about 13.7 gm. of sodium bromid and about 4.1 gm. of ammonium bromid in each 100 c.c. of the preparation. The residue on drying amounted to about 18.4 gm. in each 100 c.c. Small amounts of an alkali, probably sodium carbonate and of a bitter substance, probably gentian, were present."The analysis shows that Peeke's Remedy, like practically every other "cure for fits," depends for its action on bromids. Peeke's nostrum does not even have the saving grace of novelty. Even the false and misleading claims are old. The labels on the stuff contain the following statements :"A perfectly safe remedy.""Contains nothing whatever that will be injurious to either body or mind." "It can be used with perfect safety by the youngest or oldest sufferer." A preparation of the bromids is not a "perfectly safe remedy" in the hands of uninstructed laymen, neither in such hands can the preparation "be used with perfect safety"; nor is it true that it "contains nothing whatever that will be injurious to either body or mind." It would seem that the federal authorities have three counts on which to declare this product misbranded under the Food and Drugs Act.—(From The Journal A. M. A., Nov. 30, 1912.)Misbranded.—Parker R. Whitcomb. who traded as "Prof. W. H. Peeke, F. D., New York," sold a nostrum which the federal chemists declared was essentially a solution of sodium bromid and ammonium carbonate in water. Whitcomb claimed that his stuff was a cure for epilepsy and fits. The government declared, on the contrary, that it was not, and that the claims were false and fraudulentand made knowingly and in reckless and wanton disregard of their truth or falsity. Whitcomb pleaded guilty and was fined $50.—[Notice of Judymcnt No. 4447; issued Oct. 16, 1916.]

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                           EARLY CHEVROLET ADS                                                                                                   1920S

 

      

A Death's Head Bottle.

"C. H. Lee & Co. of Jamaica Plain, report a very active and rapidly increasing demand for the Lee Poison Bottle, illustrated herewith. The bottle requires no label to inform one of the poisonous nature of its contents, and tliio advantage is being very widely and thoroughly appreciated. For full description and prices of the bottles address C. H Lee & Co., Jamaica Plain. Boston, Mass.. mentioning this journal."

 

                        STROHS BOTTLE TOPPER


 

MY STROH'S BOTTLE TOPPER, THIS I TRADED OFF MARK,SAW HIM DIG IT AND HAD TOO HAVE IT.

 

1850
Bernhard Stroh establishes brewery in Detroit. Logo uses the Lion's Crest from the Kyrburg Castle in Germany. Brewery is called Lion's Head Brewery. The lion crest is still used today on packaging.

1890’s
Stroh introduces European fire-brewing method. Process uses a direct flame rather than steam to heat copper kettles, claiming higher temperatures bring out more flavor.

1956
Stroh sales reach 2.7 million barrels.

1964
Brewery faces “Grow or Go” dilemma. Buys Goebel Brewing Company across the street, adding 200,000 barrels of capacity. In 1972 becomes top ten brewer with market area of nine states.

1973
Becomes eighth-largest brewery selling 4 million barrels in 17 states.

1978
Volume reaches 6.4 million barrels nearly outgrowing the 7 million barrel production capacity. Purchases New York's F&M Schaefer Brewing Corporation, gaining access to Schaefer's 1 million barrel brewery in Allentown, PA. Gains Schaefer and Piel’s brands.

1982
Acquires Schlitz and becomes third-largest brewer. Stroh reduces price of Schlitz to below the premium level. Abandons the fire-brewing process.

1985
Claims 12 percent of the U.S. beer market maintaining its third place position. Debt load from Schlitz acquisition hinders ability to invest in production efficiencies. Stroh closes its aging Detroit brewery in 1985. By 1990 Stroh's market share is cut in half.

1991
Implements 3-pronged strategy: new products, contract brewing, and expanding overseas. Launch Old Milwaukee NA (non-alcoholic) and Stroh's NA.

1994-95
Launch Old Milwaukee Ice, Schlitz Ice, Schlitz Ice Light, Bull Ice, Schaefer Ice, Stroh’s Genuine Draft Light, Old Milwaukee Genuine Draft, and Schlitz Genuine Draft.

1996
Acquires Heileman for $290 million. (Heileman had been bought by the Bond Corp. of Australia for $1.3 billion in 1982, and then purchased out of bankruptcy court by the Dallas buyout firm Hicks Muse Tate for $390 million in 1993).

1999
Acquired by Pabst Brewing Company.

 

                       1850S  WHISKEY                        1920'S OIL BOTTLE                            EBENEZER A. PEARLS

 

VERY CRUDE 1850S WHISKEY I DUG AT AGE 14 AND STILL IS ONE OF MY FAVORITES

I ALWAYS GRAB THESE WHEN I GET THE CHANCE, THIS ONE IS AGOOD AS THEY COME WITH NO RUST AND CLEAN GLASS. 

 "Ebenezer A. Pearl's / Tincture of Life if aqua, rectangular, and 7 3/4 inches tall. I have been told that the label includes a picture of flowers and that the origin is Oriskany Falls, NY. The product was advertised for coughs, colds, sore throats, etc. in the Boonville Herald (NY) February 16, 1888."

 

                                          BUG ~ I ~ CIDE BUG KILLER, BALTIMORE MD.

OLIVE AMBER EARLY PART OF THE 1900'S BUG BOTTLE, A NEAT DISPLAY

This has now become almost as well an established remedy as the arsenites. It is cheap, simple and effectual. It is made of soap, kerosenft oil and water—three ingredients that the farmer always has at his command. The formula is, to two quarts of water add one quart of soft soap or one fourth pound of hard soap, and heat the whole to boiling. When the soap is dissolved take from the fire, add a pint of kerosene and agitate so thoroughly and rapidly with a force pump without the nozzle, that the mixture will foam like milk when filling a dairyman's pail on a summer's evening. It should be churned in this way until the soap and oil become permanently mixed; that is. until the oil will not rise or appear on standing or when diluted. This will take at least three minutes rapid work. Stirring with a stick or spoon, or slow pumping will not emulsify the soap and oil, though an egg beater may be used for a very small quantity. The emulsion as first made is too strong and will injure the plants unless diluted before applying. The soft soap emulsion should have as much water added as there is emulsion, and the hard soap emulsion twice its bulk of water added and well stirred. They are now ready to be applied with a spray pump. The dilute emulsion should be stirred frequently in applying.

The above is the regular formula. The emulsion can be made in larger quantities in the same proportion, but if made in quantities larger than six or eight times the regular formula, it will be difficult to make a stable emulsion with a small hand force pump. This has been one of the discouraging features in the uses of kerosene emulsion. It now seems evident that we can overcome that difficulty in a large measure. The method is to use the soft soap formula, as given above, leaving out the water. The soft soap is heated until it becomes liquid and then, without water, add half as much oil as there has been soap used, emulsifying according to the directions already given. The emulsion made in this way is as perfect as when made with water and is so concentrated that it is one-third oil, or in other words, the same emulsion in this way occupies less than one-half the space that it would when made by the first formula given. An emulsion made in this way without water will need to be diluted with four times its own bulk of water before using.

It was certainly owing to the improper emulsifying that led to the woolcoming off his sheep as reported by Mr. Beck in the Michigan Farmer, Dec. 9. and in not recommending its use as long as the other dips could be used.

There is little question but that it will take the wool off if there is free oil on the surface, but if thoroughly emulsified and properly prepared there is no better and more effectual sheep dip used and it is much cheaper than the others too. (Mr. Sherwood has found this effectual on sheep scab.)

For lice on stock and hogs it is also an excellent treatment. Take a pail of the diluted emulsion and a scrub brush and in a very little while a stable full of live stock can have their coats thoroughly saturated. A thorough scrubbing of all the parts in this way will effectually free the stock of lice and produce a remarkably sleek, glossy coat and hide. Lousy hogs may be cornered in the pen and sprayed if thought best. As a last resort the emulsion may be used in ridding a badly infested chicken house of lice or mites.

For the little plant lice that throng so many of our plants and trees so early in the season, and the most of the plant bugs, about the only remedy that we have is the emulsion. It is also one of our best specifics for scales lice which we find attached to the bark of trees in scale-like manner, as the little apple tree bark louse. The oil in the emulsion will penetrate many of these scales and so reach the occupant inside. The emulsion is always more effectual if thrown with force on an insect as in a spray and should be used in this way always, if possible

 

                                CLAR~O~TYPE TYPEWRITER CLEANER CLEANER
                           CALDER'S DENTINE   PROVIDENCE,R.I.  ~ SCHLITZ BEER TRAY
 

  NICE LITTLE 1880'S DENTAL BOTTLE DUG SOME YEARS AGO,CORK ADDED.

Albert L. Calder was born in Providence, September 6, 1825. He died in this city May 24, 1899. He was the son of William and Eliza (Spencer) Calder. When seventeen years of age he entered the employ of Joseph Balch, the druggist, and remained with him for about seven years. After a few years spent in drug stores in Boston and Lowell he returned to Providence, and in company with his brother, George B. Calder, opened an apothecary's store on Westminster Street. This store was burned to the ground in 1853, whereupon Mr. Calder erected near the site of the old store a new building, which he continued to occupy until his retirement from the retail business in 1885. It is said that when he sold out he was the oldest merchant on Westminster Street. After his retirement from the retail field he gave his time to the manufacture of Calder's Dentine, an article which, like another Providence production, Perry Davis's Pain-Killer, is to be found in every apothecary's store in the country. Mr. Calder served for eight years in the Common Council of Providence. He represented the city in the Legislature in 1891-92. Always an active Republican, he was. especially prominent in city politics during the Civil War. He was connected as a director with many corporations, was a trustee of the Rhode Island Hospital and vice-president of the Industrial Trust Co. He was twice married, first to Martha Ann Howland, of Barre, Mass. Her four children, Mrs. R. A. Robertson, Mrs. John G. Aldrich, Dr. Augustus W. Calder and Charles A. Calder, are still living. In 1892 he married Mrs. Ellen O'Connor, of Washington, D. C., who survives him. He became a member of the Historical Society in 1891

 

                   DATED 1882 EXCIDE BATTERY JAR                     THE ELECTRIC STORAGE BATTERY CO.

 

New Storage Battery Jar, Practically Unbreakable

The storage battery in the mind of the average layman is apt to mean a "black box of mystery" mounted on his automobile to start his motor and furnish current for his lights. He is very apt to regard the battery as being delicate in construction, whereas the storage battery actually is today playing a very important part in the most strenuous service. As an instance of this the mine locomotive may be cited.

This mine service is usually severe and the battery must be exceptionally rugged to withstand the bangs and bumps. The tracks as a rule are bad and frequent head-on collisions are not unusual. The battery has in this service, however, made a wonderful record. In the past there has been but one serious objection, the battery's jars would some times crack under an unusually severe jolt.

The Electric Storage Battery Co., manufacturers of the "Ironclad-Exide" battery, realizing this, has for some time been experimenting to develop an unbreakable jar. What is known as the "Giant" jar is the result.

The "Giant" jar of the "Ironclad-Exide" battery, is made of a semi-flexible compound, exceptionally tough and strong. Exhaustive tests have proved that these "Giant" jars will stand a pressure of 2,000 pounds at their weakest point, whereas the old type jar broke at less than 1,000 pounds; that the "Giant" jar will support at its weakest point the

[graphic][subsumed]
[graphic]

Two "Iron-Exlde" Giant Jart Supporting Eight Husky Men

weight of four husky men, whereas the old jar would not support the weight of one man; that an electrical test of 30.000 volts does not puncture the "Giant" jar.

Moreover thousands of these jars have in actual service demonstrated their ability to withstand the hardest and most severe service. The "Giant" jar is now the standard for the "Ironclad-Exide" battery that is so very extensively used for mine locomotives, industrial trucks and

                                        STONEWARE BED WARMER ~ PONTILED UTILITY/POLISH

INTERNAL THREADED NECK, TRIANGULAR SHAPED 1920S RANGE STONEWARE BEDWARMER. THESE WERE FILLED WITH  VERY HOT WATER AND PLACED IN BEDS..USALLY AT THE FOOT OF THE BED UNDER THE COVERS AND CREATED AN INSTANT HEATER.

 A NICE 6 INCH TALL PONTILED UTILITY/POLISH BOTTLE I DUG IN A DUMP BEHIND A HOUSE BUILT IN 1798, STILL CAN'T FIND THE PRIVY.