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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK ARCHIVES  10~2009 -  12~2010

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {12 ~ 26 ~ 2010}                                                      UNITED DRUG CO. COFFIN POISON

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {12~26~2010} IS YET ANOTHER ONE OF MY POISONS I LIQUIDATED FOR THE SAKE OF MY BLOB COLLECTION....UNITED DRUG CO. AMBER COFFIN POISON, THIS IS A NICE AND PRETTY SCARCE BOTTLE. MUCH RARER IN LARGER SIZES THAN THIS 3 1/2 INCH SIZE. THE MERGER OF RIKER~HEGEMAN FROM NEW YORK AND UNITED DRUG IN IN BOSTON IN ABOUT 1912

  RIKER-HEGEMAN & UNITED DRUG MERGER

There was a well denned report in Wall street this week that the Riker-Hegeman chain of drug stores in New York and the East was to be merged with the United Drug Co., of Boston, through a deal whereby the Whelan holdings of the Riker-IIegeman combination controlling the latter company would be taken over by interests associated with the United Drug Co. No official confirmation of the report was obtainable, though it was admitted that negotiations had been practically completed for a unity of the two interests.

Strength of the United Drug Co. shares has been a feature of the market lately, but the Riker shares have been inactive.

If this combination goes through and it is understood that its consummation depends upon the sanction by the U. S. Department of Justice or the Trade Commission of one of several plans that have been submitted to the Government for approval, it will mean a combination that would be very powerful in the Eastern drug store field and incidentally it would mean a close co-operation between the enlarged drug store combination and the Whelan interests in the United Cigar Stores Corporation.

The United Drug Company owns laboratories and large plants in New England and has stores in the principal cities, while the Riker-Hegeman Co. has a long chain of stores in the East. The combination may be formed under the control of a holding company, but the form of capitalization and character of it cannot be determined until the Government acts. It is said the Government is favorable to the combination in general, through approval of the form has not as yet been promised. The combination represents a total capitalization of the two companies of something like $25,000,000.

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {12~19~2010}  SHARPE AND DOHME                             SMILING SCULL POISON

 

ONE FROM MY POISON COLLECTION THAT I LIQUIDATED FOR BLOBS FOR THE NON COMMERCIAL SIDE OF THEM IN COMPARISON TO ALOT OF POISONS. THE SMILING SCULL IS A VERY AFFORDABLE AND POPULAR POISON WITH COLLECTORS.

INFORMATION FROM 1918  AMERICAN DRUGGIST

THE SO CALLED SMILING SCULL POISON FROM SHARPE AND DOHME CO., AVAILABLE IN BOTH BLOWN IN MOLD AND MACHINE MADE VARIANTS.  

The firm was established in 1860 at the corner of Howard and Pratt streets, Baltimore-the site of their present plant. From time to time, as the need for more adequate facilities for manufacturing purposes was felt, additional buildings were erected, and in 1892 the entire plant was practically rebuilt, greatly enlarged and completely equipped with the most improved machinery for the manufacture of pharmaceuticals. Their line is large and varied and embraces in addition to Standard Medicinal fluid, Solid and Powdered Extracts, Solume Gelatin and Sugar-Coated Pills. Granular Effervescent Salts, Soluble Hypodermic Tablets, Compressed Tablets. Tablet titurates, Elixirs, Syrups and Cordials, full line of high grade Pepsins ranging digestive power from 1:2000 to 1:2 d including their well-known S. & D. guaranteed standard just twice the standard adopted by the U. S. P., 1890. S. & D. deserve great credit for having generally introduced Porous Hypodermic Tablets, which are unquestionably much more rapidly soluble and therefore better adapted for subcutaneous use than are Compressed Hypodermic Tablets. Ergotole is another S. & D. product which has on merit alone won general professional recognition. This is a palatable liquid form of Ergot 22 times the strength of the official fluid extract, and which we believe can be used hypodermically without causing abscess. It is especially recommended for internal use because of its pleasant taste, small dose and freedom from nauseating properties.

Mr. Louis Dohme, the president of the company, is well known in pharmaceutical and chemical circles. His genial affability and personal magnetism have won for S. & D. a host of warm friends. He continues to be the active general superintendent of the affairs of the company. Mr. Chas. E. Dohme, the vice-president, a thoroughly practical pharmacist and chemist, has charge of the laboratories in Baltimore, and personally supervises the manufacturing departments.

Mr. Ernest Stoffregen, the secretary and treasurer, a good financier and a just, courteous gentleman personally, manages the business department from their general offices at 41 John street, New York. Dr. Alfred Dohme, who is in charge of the analytical department, has enjoyed exceptional educational advantages both fn America and Europe, and personally assays the crude drugs purchased for manufacturing purposes. Each member of S. & D. is a practical man, thoroughly conversant with the most minute details of his department. The Chicago house is in charge of Chas. E. Matthews & Bro.

S. & D. long ago adopted a business policy which alms to protect both the jobber and the retailer in their mutual relations as well as in their business association with the medical profession. Their creed is purity of drugs, excellence and uniformity of product and courteous treatment of their patrons, and on these lines they have developed their large and constantly growing business

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {12~12~2010}                                              RARE SIZE RIKER HEGEMAN POISON

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 12/12/2010 IS THE SMALLEST SIZE RIKER HEGEMAN POISON FROM NEW YORK AND DATING TO LATTER PART OF 1800S. THIS IS FROM MY POISON COLLECTION I LIQUIDATED TO GET INTO BLOBS AND INKS. 

 

 

 

 A Reminiscence of Older New York.

In New York City there are still left a few of the pharmacists who conducted a successful retail business in the days prior to the war. Hazard, Hazard & Co., J. N. Hegeman & Co., J. Milhaus' Son, Fraser & Co., and a few others whose names are not alone known locally but are familiar in nearly all parts of the country.

The removal of Hazard, Hazard & Co. from the well known premises beneath the Fifth Avenne Hotel to a six-story building designed by their own architect for the special needs of a modern pharmacist, recalls some of the circumstances connected with the opening of the Fifth Avenue Hotel and the pharmacy which, for some thirty-five years, was an ornament to that famous hostelry.

In 1856 J. N. Hegeman, according to report, conducted and was proprietor of thirteen New York drug stores, and at the time of the erection of the Fifth Avenue Hotel was actively engaged in adding to the number He had, in fact, made arrangements with J. C. Eno to lease the premises which was afterward occupied by the late J. R. Caswell, of the firm of Caswell, Hegeman & Co ; but Mr. Caswell was thought to have been a little more prompt in his arrangements for securing a lease. At all events he became the lessee, and Hegeman, a few years later, adopted the policy of concentrating his forces and gave up many of his stores as a consequence.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {12~5~2010}                                                                     WM. RADAMS MICROBE KILLER

   
THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS THE EVER POPULAR WM. RADAMS MICROBE  KILLER, WHICH WITH THE FOOD AND DRUG ACT OF 1906 WAS SHOWN TO BE NO MORE THAN A QUACK CURE .. THE BOTTLES AND STONEWARE JUGS ARE VERY COLLECTED AND THERE ARE MANY VARIANTS.
A correspondent asks for information concerning "Radam's Microbe Killer," as he has a patient with cancer whose family are strongly urging the use of this nostrum.

"Radam's Microbe Killer" was shown up by Mr. Adams in his "Great American Fraud" series and also in the report of the Australia Royal Commission. This nostrum had a great vogue some years ago and then seemed to drop out of notice; apparently, however, it has been revived recently and is being pushed vigorously, especially ;n New York City and on the Pacific coast. A few months ago the federal government seized a consignment of this preparation (see index) and served notice on the firm in whose possession it was found. The court decided that the product should be destroyed and that the firm in question shall pay all the costs of the proceedings. The "Notice of Judgment" published by the government did not give in detail the results of the government analysis, but application to the Department of Agriculture regarding the composition of this nostrum brought the following letter:

"The acting secretary has officially authorized giving you the information relative to the composition of 'Radam's Microbe Killer.' The results are as follows:

"Sulphuric acid 0.59 per cent.   "Sulphurous acid 0.016 per cent.

"Inorganic matter (ash) '. 0.013 per cent.      "Water by difference 00.381 per cent.

"The above clearly shows that 'Radam's Microbe Killer' is a mixture of sulphuric acid and sulphurous acid dissolved in ordinary hydrant water. It is quite possible that the sulphuric acid may have been present in part as sulphurous acid." (From The Journal A. M. A., July 16, 1910.)

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {11~28~2010}                                                            C.W. MERCHANTS  GARGLING OIL

  THIS WEEKS BOTTLE, MERCHANTS GARGLING OIL WITH FULL LABEL. THESE RE AVAILABLE IN A VARIED SHADE OF GREENS AND COBALT LIKE THIS ONE AS WELL.

 C.W.MERCHANTS    Gargling Oil Liniment

Yellow Wrapper for Animal and White for Human Flesh.

"Whether for Ubc on man or beast, Merchant's Gargling Oil will be found an invaluable Liniment, and worthy of use by every resident in the land. We know of no proprietary medicine or article now used lu the United States which shares the good-will of the people to a greater decree than this. Yellow wrapper for animal and white for human flesh."—New York Independent."

From C. T. Dale & Co.. Mortonsville, Ky.—We sell about twenty bottles of Gurgling Oil where we sell one of any otber liniment, and the last year we have bought and sold more than any year previous.  From Dr. J. P. Terrell, Warren, I ml., March 3, 1856.—I am engaged in the practice of medicine, and find your Gargling Oil an extremely efficient remedy in all cases where an external application is indicated.   From J. C. B. Ish, M. D., dated Arrow Rook, Mo., Sept. 9, 1872.—I sell a great deal of your Gargling Oil, and think it the finest medicine I ever saw.

Merchant's Gargling Oil as a Family Liniment.

We are now, and have been for some years, preparing the Oil free from stain, to , be used as a common Liniment for human flesh, extracting the coloring ingredient which has heretofore rendered it objectionable. This Oil possesses all the medicinal properties of that prepared with the dark tinge for horses and cattle, and wilt be found one of the best remedies for all purposes where a liniment is required that has ever been manufactured.

Although prepared intentionally for human flesh, answers as well for beasts, vice versa, the dark Oil answers as well for human, flesh, only It will stain and discolor the skin, bnt not permanently. Yellow wrapper for animal and white for human flesh.

Gargling Oil Liniment as an Internal Remedy.

Merchant's Gargling Oil is a diffusible stimulant and carminative. It can be taken internally when snch a remedy is indloated, and is a good substitute for painkillers, cordials and anodynes. For Cramps or Spasms of the Stomach, Colic, Asthma, or Internal Pain, the dose may be from fifteen to twenty drops, on sugar, or mixed with syrup In any convenient form, and repeated at intervals of three to six hours. Yellow wrapper for animal and white for hnman flesh.

Merchant's  Gargling Oil is the Standard Liniment of the United States. Established 1833. Large size, $1; medium, 50c.; small, 25c.; small size for family use, 25c.

Manufactured at Lookport, N. Y., by M. G. O. Co., and sold by all druggists.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {11~21~10}   KNICKERBOCKER SODA WATER  IN COBALT  NEW YORK CITY

 MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS SITE

FROM THE SITE OF MY FRIENDS AT THE MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS, BELOW IS A PART OF ONE PRIVY DIG IN WHICH A KNICKERBOCKER LIKE THIS ONE ....IF NOT THIS ONE WAS FOUND. PLEASE BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THEIR SITE,WELL DONE AND ALWAYS UPDATED. 

 
"About a week ago we had the pleasure of excavating a hundred intact bottles and miscellaneous pieces from 1845-1870. These were unearthed in the privy right next door from today's adventures. Remarkably, during day two of that project the broken remains of a small photograph, showing a seated gentlemen and believed to be a daguerreotype, were uncovered in the privy. The third and final day of that excavation was spent sifting and assembling various shard-piles for the local history professor who owns the property.

Also, at the very bottom lying down perfectly flat but firmly wedged under a large rock, circa 1849, we discovered a W. P. Knickerbocker and a Dr H Swaynes Vermifuge to add to the grand total, which concluded that dig.
The houses where these digs took place are part of a half dozen identical residences which were constructed in about 1849. On that side of the block in earlier years had been shops, factories and stables. Prior to this the land was owned by the affluent president of the Greenwich Insurance Co; he and his family owned large tracts of land in that part of Manhattan. More than once it was brought to our attention that a "well established builder" eventually bought the land from the insurance company president around 1849. The builder even lived in the end house during the 1850s. We were told that his house had been constructed with indoor plumbing...the first on the block. A sour tasting bit of information indeed, from a diggers' point of view. Even more so in light of the sobering fact that everyone understood it was constructed by a wealthy person, during a progressive era, when a few homes in Manhattan actually had plumbing. Despite the detumescent quality of this concern, the shovels and probe conveyed a different story altogether, regarding privies (after a careful examination of the backyards and basements it was determined that these addresses had no discernible cisterns). A story with an ending wrapped up at the bottom of two privies, one ten feet deep, the other eleven, and each chock full of interesting discoveries, including scores of pontiled bottles. "

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {11 ~ 14 ~ 10}  RARE L.P. DODGE RHEUMATIC LINEMENT NEWBURGH N.Y.

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS ANOTHER GREAT BOTTLE FROM THE MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS SITE, A VERY RAER OPEN PONTIL L.P. DODGE RHEUMATIC LINEMENT FROM NEWBURG, NEW YORK. WHAT A GREAT COLOR. I AM TOLD THIS ONE CAME FROM A PRIVY IN N.Y.C. IN 1999. THANKS TO DAN AND THE CREW FROM MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS, BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THEIR GREAT SITE. THANKS, GUYS. GREAT STUFF. 

 

No. 35,222.—L. P. Dodge, of Newburg, N. Y. Improvement in Pumps.—Patent dated May 13, 18G2.—This invention cons.sts in arranging the ball valves in valve chambers divided by a partition in the lower portion of tho air chamber, extending from which to each end of the barrel of the pump, are two discharge passages provided with a valve, seat in the same plane with the top of the barrel. This construction is designed to avoid making more thau one joint, and that a small and easily adjusted ot-e.

Claim.—First, the arrangement of the valves M Л in the valve chambers К L in the base of the nir vessel II, and arranging the scats / g neai the joint between the parts, so that there is but a single joint of small area connecting the passages F G with the air chamber, all as set forth and for the purpose specified.

 MANHATTEN WELL DIGGER SITE

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  {11 ~ 7 ~ 10}                                                                     PUCE LYONS BED BUG POISON

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS ANOTHER FROM MY FRIENDS AT MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS, I MANAGE TO FIND A COUPLE OF VERY COOL LITTLE ADS FOR THIS PRODUCT. THANKS GUYS, MORE GREAT STUFF !!

In May of 1858, the following

 poetic advertisement appeared on the pages of the

New York Times:

 

              GOOD ADVICE. Of sleep devoid,

Are you annoyed By Bugs, athirst for blood? Do Rats and Mice Mock each device You try to slay the brood? A secret hear: Your house to clear, Use LYON’S Dust and Pills; The first will slay Bugs, “right away,” The second vermin kills.

LYON’S MAGNETIC POWDER and PILLS

for the destruction of Insects and Vermin. 424 Broadway.

 

 

 New York Times, 10 May 1858,

DEAD! DEAD!
In wall or bed,
LYON’S POWDER “lays” them—
Bed-bugs, fleas,
That mar our ease—
LYON’S POWDER slays them.
Roaches, ants,
Bugs on plants,
LYON’S FLAKES amaze them.
Dead! Dead!
In house and shed,
LYON’S PILLS tremendous
Kill the rats
And mice, sans cats,
And gloriously befriend us.
Lyon’s Magnetic Powder and Pills for noxious insects and vermin. No. 424
Broadway.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK   {11 ~ 1 ~ 10 }                                                                                  TEAKETTLE   INKWELL

 FROM THE COLLECTION OF THE  GANG AT THE MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS, LOOK AT THE COLOR OF THIS TEAKETTLE INKWELL. DUG FROM PRIVY IN NYC AREA AND DATING TOO THE LAST QUARTER OF THE 1800'S. THANKS DAN AND ALL THE CREW FROM MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS FOR THIS ONE AND THE  ONES COMING UP, AMAZING STUFF.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHECK OUT THEIR SITE HERE, NO DISAPPOINTMENTS     MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS


 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {10~10~10}                                          CANTRELL & COCHRANE MINERAL WATER

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 10~10~10 COMES FROM MY FRIEND IN CANADA, WAYNE WAGAR. LOOK AT THE COLOR OF THIS ONE...I FOUND SOME INFO AND ADDED IT. I WILL BE IN SCHOOL AND TRAVELING SO THIS ONE MIGHT STAY LONGER THAN 1 WEEK BUT WILL CATCH UP.THANKS WAYNE FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR GREAT STUFF. PLEASE VISIT WAYNES  SITE, BELOW. AWSOME STUFF!!!

http://www.theouthouse.ca/

   CANTRELL & COCHRANE, Aerated and Mineral Water    Manufacturers, Dublin, Belfast, Glasgow, and London. Telegraphic Address:—"Cantrell." Telephone Number:—"98."

SOME thirty years ago St. Patrick's Well was known only to the antiquary, and to him only by report, although for ages past it had been held in great reverence by the disciples of Ireland's patron saint. For centuries the water had been justly famed for its volume and purity ; then, for some unaccountable reason, the well fell into neglect and was forgotten. But the perseverance and research of Sir Henry Cochrane brought the spring again to light; its pure and sparkling waters are now turned to account by Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane in their Dublin manufactory. This eminent Firm has done much to increase the commercial prosperity of the two principal cities of our sister isle. Through them the Irish mineral waters have become famous in every corner of the civilised world, and the production of these delicious and wholesome drinks enormously increased. Through them, also, every temperance advocate has gained an important and valuable weapon. One of the greatest difficulties which the cause of temperance has had to contend with has been the scarcity and unattractiveness of non-intoxicating drinks ; this same difficulty has now long since been dissipated by the aid of Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane, whose really palatable substitutes for beer, wine, and spirits have done much, and are doing still more, in the cause of temperance than the united efforts of a dozen lecturers or enthusiastic wearers of blue ribbon.

There will always be some difference of opinion concerning legislative interposition with the liquor traffic ; but, with regard to the propriety and beneficence of tempting the public to abandon intoxicating liquors by setting before them non-alcoholic beverages which are at once wholesome and agreeable, there can, we think, be no two opinions : this is the important part that this Firm have taken in the


temperance movement; the public are grateful for their pleasant beverages, and the factories at Dublin and Belfast flourish like the green bay-tree.

The foundation of the enormous business which this Firm conduct was laid in 1852 by Dr. Cantrell, who in that year commenced operations in Belfast. His original premises were situated in Bank Lane; but, in spite of frequent extensions, these were soon found to be insufficient for the increasing business, and a move, therefore, became absolutely necessary.

Dr. Cantrell migrated to the magnificent premises in Victoria Square, known as Cromac Building, where the Belfast branch of the business has ever since been carried on. We give a small sketch of these works, which gives some idea of their extent and appearance.

About this time a partnership was arranged between the original founder of the manufactory and Alderman Cochrane, of Dublin. While the Belfast branch continued to thrive and grow, perhaps even greater progress was made at the Nassau Works in the Irish metropolis, the fame of the Firm rapidly spreading to all quarters of the globe. A few years ago Dr. Cantrell retired from business, and Alderman Cochrane (now Sir Henry Cochrane) has since that time been the head of the Firm.

Doubtless the primary cause of the extraordinary success attained by Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane is to be found in the spirit of enterprise and the indomitable perseverance displayed by the members of the Firm, as much as in their constant endeavour to do a large business in such a way as to give complete satisfaction to the public. As a secondary cause, resulting in a measure from the first, we should mention, in particular, the scrupulous cleanliness with which the operations are conducted throughout their works, a point which is clearly of the first importance in the manufacture of such goods as mineral waters. Then, again, the abundant supply of the purest and most suitable water which they can command, both in Dublin and in Belfast, is no unimportant factor in their success. Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane displayed much enterprise in utilising the springs both at the Nassau Works and at Cromac Building. We have spoken of the St. Patrick's Well at Dublin, and shown how this Firm have turned the historic spring to account. With regard to the Belfast Works, it was here necessary to sink a well at the cost of no less than £2,000 ; which sum, by the way, had to be risked with the possibility that every penny might be lost. Upon reaching a depth of 116 feet, a fortunate result was obtained ; after passing through layers of silt and blue lias, through strata of gravel, clay, rock, sand, and, finally, of red freestone, an abundant supply of sparkling Cromac water was reached, greatly to the relief and subsequent advantage of the proprietors and of the public. Success greatly depends upon the suitability of the water supply in the production of aerated beverages. With the aid of the Cromac springs of Belfast, and St. Patrick's Well in Dublin, Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane have been enabled to establish their world-wide reputation. What the water of Burton-on-Trent has done for brewers in England, the Patrick and Cromac springs have done for aerated waters in Ireland.

With a view of giving some idea of the scale upon which operations are conducted, we may mention that Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane employ over 500 men, and that no less than fifty two-horse vans are kept to deliver their goods to dealers. The works have capacity for turning out the extraordinary number of 160,000 bottles per diem, when such a rate of production is demanded by the state of the trade.

Organisation and methodical arrangement are everywhere resorted to for the purpose of carrying on the extensive operations of the business, at once smoothly and without waste of any description. The Dublin premises, situated in Nassau Place, at the rear of Kildare Street, cover an area of nearly half an acre, and the Belfast Works, which are the most extensive in that city, are about equally large. All the machinery is constructed on the most modern and highly-approved principles.

In a mineral water factory, the cleansing department is an important one; here all is rapidly and vigorously carried forward. We are not able here to follow the details of the process of manufacture ; nothing but such materials as gutta-percha, glass, and silver are used in connexion with the bottlingmachines, lest any risk should be incurred of metallic contamination. The packing for export deserves a word in passing, since the goods of this Firm are to be found all over the Continent and in many other parts of the world. The bottles to be sent abroad are carefully filled, corked, and wired, and finally packed with care in barrels padded with hay.

Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane's beverages are praised by all to whom they are familiar, but for the benefit of those who do not yet know them we must make some mention of their advantages One of their most popular drinks is their famous " Aromatic Ginger Ale," which the veteran champion of temperance, Mr. S. C. Hall, has lauded again and again, and which has been frequently spoken of in the highest praise by the press and medical profession ; and as a warming and invigorating, yet nonintoxicating drink, both agreeable and wholesome, is, perhaps, without a rival. The delightful aromatic property and unrivalled purity of this Ginger Ale account for its widespread popularity, and have procured for it the appellation of "The Beverage of the World."

" It shines and sparkles in the glass :  A glass no drinker wills to pass." " Sparkling " Montserrat is another of this firm's aerated waters, and one which has attracted the flattering notice of the faculty; it is made from the celebrated lime-fruit of the island whose name it bears. It is strongly recommended, particularly in cases of rheumatism and gout.

A specialty of Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane is the "Club Soda"; this water has been warmly approved by the distinguished analytical chemist Sir Charles Cameron, who has said that it is the most wholesome daily beverage that can be taken. " Club Soda " neutralises the lactic acid in the blood, which gives rise to rheumatism and other affections.

In the Seltzer Water which the Firm manufacture, and for which they have become famous, the mildly alkaline and tonic saline properties present in the water from the seltzer spring are reproduced ; and in the Aerated Sarsaparilla the blood-purifying properties of that plant are retained. The Lemonade of this Firm possesses the true fruity flavour of the lemon; their Potass and Lithia Waters retain respectively their medicinal properties. The Aerated Quinine, Aerated Tonic Bitters, and Carrara Waters, are all valuable additions to the list of temperance beverages prepared by Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane.

In commemoration of Her Majesty's Jubilee, the Firm brought out an entirely new drink which they have called " Koh-i-nur " ; it is as brilliant and sparkling as the jewel whose name it bears, and bids fair to remind generations yet unborn of our jubilee year.

Messrs. Cantrell & Cochrane ship their goods very largely to all parts of the world, India, China, New Zealand, Canada, the West Indies, Egypt, Cape Colony, South America, Australia, and the United States. They hold a special appointment as manufacturers to H.R.H. the Prince of Wales and to the Viceregal Court of Ireland ; they are also purveyors to the Imperial Houses of Parliament. They are contractors for the principal steamship companies. including the Cunard, Inman, Montreal, Oceanic, National, Pacific, Anchor, and other lines, and the fact of their having been awarded the unprecedented number of twenty-nine Gold and Prize Medals at the various International Exhibitions held throughout the globe is convincing evidence of the estimation in which their products are held in all: parts of the world. Lastly, they were declared the sole contractors for the Irish Exhibition, Olympia, now being held in London.

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {10 ~ 3 ~ 10 }                                     OLD CAROLINA BITTERS ~ SOUTH CAROLINA

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM FELLOW COLLECTOR AND MEMEBER, ROBERT BIRO'S COLLECTION IN SAVANNAH DUMP THIS IS ALL I HAVE FOOUND SO FAR, OTHER THAN THEY WERE NOT IN BUSINESS FOR A VERY LONG TIME. A RARE BITTERS, THANKS ROBERT FOR A GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK.

"Rick, Here is one dug in a late 1860's to a early 1870's dump in Savannah"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {9~26~10}                                                                  ANTOINE & FILS ~ PARIS, FRANCE

  A fine display is made by Antoine Fils & Co., ink manufacturers, who in their endeavor to bring out the perfect color and quality of their inks have furnished some most artistic specimens of colorprinting. 

                             

N. Antoine & Fils, Paris (London branch, 1 Prior-st., Greenwich, S. E.)—Catalogue of writing inks, with lithographed fac-similes of labels and full-sized colored illustrations of the various bottles and jars in which their wares are put up.—By parcel post we have also sample bottles of the excellent inks manufactured by this firm.

 

Antoine, Fils & Co., 13 Rose street, London, E.C.,
Jan 1898   Antoine's Ink Factory.—From an account of the celebrated ink factory of L. Antoine fils, of Paris (who advertises his products in this journal), in the Union, it appears that the firm employ no less than eighty-five workmen, besides about twenty clerks and several travellers. They have besides branch businesses and agencies in England, Germanv Spain, China, &c.

 

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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {9~19~10} YELLOW OLIVE HOLMES BLOB,                      AUBURN NEW YORK

 

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS A RARE COLOR OLIVE/YELLOW JAMES H. HOLMES FROM AUBURN NEW YORK AND PRODUCED BY THE CLYDE GLASS WORKS IN CLYDE N.Y. YOU JUST CAN'T GET BETTER COLOR THAN THIS.

JAMES H. HOLMESAMONG THE MODEL BOTTLING ESTABLISHMENTS ,OWNED BY AND MANAGED BY JAMES HOLMES FROM AUBURN NEW YORK TAKES RANK WITH THE BEST. FOR MANY YEARS MR. HOLMES HAS LABORED TOO BRING HIS BOTTLING PLANT AND SURROUNDINGS UP TOO A HIGH NOTCH OF PERFECTION.THOSE WHO ARE FORTUNATE ENOUGH TOO VISIT HIS PREMISES WILL BEAR WITNESS TO THE NEAT AND ORDERLY ARRANGMENT OF EVERYTHING IN OFFICES,BARNS AND FACTORY AS WELL AS STORAGE BUILDINGS. THE ATTACHED VIEW OF THE STEAM BOTTLING PLANT IN AUBURN THE PLANT IS LOCATED AT 38-40 CHAPEL STREET AND IS 31 X 100 FEET WITH THREE STORIES. A STRICT DISCIPLINARIAN, "JIMMIE HOLMES IS INDEED A CORKER !"

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {9~12~10}                                                  RARE PONTILED C. ELLIS, PHILADELPHIA 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS ANOTHER GREAT ONE FROM THE ROBERT BIRO COLLECTION. " Rick-A very rare pontiled ~ C. Ellis & Co. ~ Saratoga type mineral water. Dug in a 1850's privy in down town Savannah."  I DID MANAGE TO FIND SOME INFORMATION ON THIS ONE AND IT'S POSTED BELOW.THANK YOU ONCE AGAIN FOR ANOTHER IMPRESSIVE BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. SEE MORE OF ROBERTS GREAT ITEMS AT MANHATTENWELLDIGGERS.COM

MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS SITE

 

 Charles Ellis & Co., -- Wholesale Druggist 56 chestnut St. Philadelphia

ELLIS, Charles, a founder and fourth president of the Philadelphia college of pharmacy, from 1854 to 1869, was born at Muncy, Lvcoming CO., Pa., Jan. 31, 1800. His "father, William Ellis, was a native of Chester county, Pa., and his mother, Mercy Ellis, was a widely known and highly esteemed preacher among the Society of Friends. He was the fifth son of eleven children. His father died when he was six years old, and his mother zealously trained her children in the pat lis of rectitude and wisdom. He obtained his education in the schools near his home and in an academy at Manhattanville, N. Y. In 1817 he removed to Philadelphia and learned the drug business in the store of Elizabeth Marshall, who succeeded her father, Charles Marshall, to a business established by her grandfather, Christopher Marshall, before the revolution. By dint of industry, perseverance and close application to duty, he made himself proficient in the business. In 1826, with Isaac P. Morris, a fellow-apprentice, he purchased the stand, and in 1830 became its sole proprietor, engaging largely in the wholesale trade. He became one of the best pharmacists in Philadelphia, and his establishment acquired a wide reputation for the excellence of its preparations. When the College of Pharmacy was founded in 1821, Charles Ellis was one of the sixty-eight original members; from 1828 to 1842 he was recording secretary of the college; from 1842 to 1854 was vice-president, and during the succeeding fifteen years wits the able aud efficient president. He gave much time to advancing its interests, aided in enlarging its scope and increasing its capacity, and was one of the most valuable supporters of the institution. For forty-two years he was a member of the publishing committee of the "American Journal of Pharmacy," to which he frequently contributed articles. During the infancy of pharmacy as a separate science, Charles Ellis was enthusiastically in favor of advancing the business of a pharmacist to the rank of a learned profession, and he lived to see his aspirations fully realized. He had an almost paternal interest, not only in all employed under his own roof, but in every young man upon whom he, as president of the college, conferred the degree of graduate of pharmacy. For many years he was a manager of the Friends' asylum for those deprived of their reason; the Society for the Support of Charity Schools; the Philadelphia Society for Alleviating the Misery of Public Prisons; Will's Eye Hospital; the Orthopaedic Hospital; the Philadelphia Dispensary, and the Tract Association and Bible Society of the Society of Friends. He died in Philadelphia, "May 16, 1874.

Philadelphia, June 26, 1871.
Whereas, at the close of the annual meeting, just as the election was being entered upon, Charles Ellis declined re-election as a member of the Committee of Publication, on which he had served near forty years, nearly the whole time acting as Treasurer ; therefore
Resolved, That the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, appreciating the long and disinterested services of Charles Ellis as a member of the Committee of Publication, and desiring to express their sense of his faithfulness, in this public manner, hereby tender him a vote of thanks, and direct its publication in the Journal.

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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {9~5~10}                                                                                   STAFFORD'S INK COMPANY

     BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {9~5~10} IS A RARE COLORED MASTER INK FROM STAFFORDS INK COMPANY. THIS IS ONE OF MINE AND A FAVORITE FOR A BUNCH OF REASONS.

 The Stafford's ink Co., a New York brand, dates back to 1858, when S. S. Stafford, founder of the house, began to produce chemical writing fluids. The output of this firm has been enormous. Many other houses in several American cities make writing fluids, useful for the day's work

Stafford’s” violet combined writing and copying ink was first placed on the New York market in 1869, though it was in 1858 that Mr. S. S. Stafford, the founder of the house, began the manufacture of inks, which he has continued to do to the present day. His chemical writing fluids are very popular, but he does not make a tanno-gallate of iron ink without “added” color, for the trade.

 

S. S. STAFFORD, Inc., v. THAODEUS DAVIDS INK CO., Inc.
(Circuit Court of Appeals, Second Circuit February 18, 1920.)  1. Patents <g=>328— Claims for bottle stopper or pour-out valid and Infringed. Claims 2 to 7, Inclusive, of the Deppermann patent, No. 1,310,405, for a bottle stopper or pour-out suitable for Ink containers, Including a metal band, the lower part of which holds the perforated 'stopper and bottle mouth firmly together, while the upper portion holds the registering pour-out In rotatable relation to the stopper, A«td valid and infringed. 2. Patents <3=>178— Invention entitled to range of equivalents commensurate with novelty. Where the bottle stopper invented by plaintiff was new, Ingenious, and apt for commercial success, it was entitled, like other Inventions, to a range of equivalents commensurate with the novelty exhibited. 3. Patents <S=>I68(2)— Claims of renewal patent, describing competitor's article, will be strictly construed. Claims allowed on renewal of application for patent once allowed, drawn to read directly on what a competitor had just put out, will be closely scanned and strictly construed, but cannot be disregarded, If they naturally grow out of the specifications. Appeal from the District Court of the United States for the Southern District of New York. Suit by S. S. Stafford, Incorporated, against the Thaddeus Davids Ink Company, Incorporated. From a decree for plaintiff, defendant appeals. Affirmed. Appeal from decree hi equity holding valid, and Infringed by defendant, claims 2 to 7, inclusive, of Deppennann patent, No. 1,310,405, for which application was filed November '£), 1913, renewed February 24, 1919 (within the statutory period), and issued July 15, 1919. The subject of patent Is a "pour-out" or "bottle stopper" especially suitable for ink containers. Both parties are makers and sellers of inks; Deppermann Is an employe of Stafford, and that company put on the market the article made under the patent in suit, about the middle of 1915. As plaintiff is a large maker of Ink, the device promptly became known—among others—to one Silverthorne, who before that time was working over bottle stoppers. In 1918 Silverthorne agreed to furnish stoppers to defendant; they were put on the market in January, 1019, a patent baring been applied for February 9, 1918, which issued August 20, 1919 (Silverthorue, 1,314,489). Plaintiff procured specimens of the Silverthorne stopper as soon as defendant sold them, and shortly before Deppermann renewed his application. This action was begun promptly on issuance of patent. Deppermann's application, as filed, propounded very numerous claims, which, though amended repeatedly, were all rejected, except what is now No. S.  For other cases see same topic & KEY-NUMUER in all Key-Numbered Digests A Iiidexe*  This was allowed April 2, 1915, and all efforts to get through additional claims failing, the patent was allowed Hay 29, 1017, with this one claim which Is as follows: "In a device of the character described, the combination with a pour-out stopper having a liquid vent and an air vent, the said sropper divided into separate upper and lower members, of an embracing ring adapted to rigidly clamp the lower member to the bottle and hold the upper member loosely whereby the upper member is permitted to rotate on the lower member, an "open-and-shut" indicator comprising an index on the upper member, and "open-and-shut" stations arranged on said securing ring, and means integral with the lower member co-operating with means integral with the securing ring, whereby the relation of the lower member to the ring is determined." Plaintiff (which apparently controlled Deppermann) let the application lapse for nonpayment of fees, and renewed only after the defendant's Silverthorne stopper had been examined. The renewal found more official favor than the original, and the other claims in suit were all offered, presumably drawn, and certainly allowed, after applicant or his counsel had studied Silverthorne. Of them, No. 4 is a good example: "A pour-out for bottles comprising in combination a lower nnd an upper member having corresponding passages and relatively rotatable, and a twopart ring having one part engaging the upper member to hold it from vertical movement while permitting horizontal rotation, and the other part securing the lower member rigid to the bottle and Interlocking means preventing relative rotation of the lower member and said ring."  The second claim is much like it, except that for "two-part ring" is substituted the phrase "annular fastening member," plus a description of what the "member" does. It is found as a fact, that these claims were drawn with an eye to Silverthorne's device, and in the hope of rendering teasier victory in this or a similar suit. The Silverthorne patent contains numerous claims, of which the following (No. 17) gives perhaps the simplest description of what the lower court held to infringe: "An attachment designed to be affixed to a bottle and including a retaining ring, a valve seat fitted within said ring, a valve mounted for rotary movement on said seat, said valve including a base part rotatably mounted within said ring and held to the seat thereby and an upper part extending above said ring, said upper part constituting a finger piece for rotating the valve, said valve provided with a liquid discharging passageway opening therefrom through the finger piece." W. P. Preble, of New York City, for appellant.
Harry E. Knight, of New York City, for appellee. Before WARD, HOUGH, and MANTON, Circuit Judges. HOUGH, Circuit Judge (after stating the facts as above). [1] Viewed in perspective, Deppermann's difficulties in the office are easy of understanding. His specification never changed; what he had achieved was and is, as a visible, mechanical thing, both plain and simple; but he insisted on claims which usually defined the thing in terms (as his solicitor put it) of function, or, as it seems to us, of result. The seventh claim defined the means by which result was reached, and was therefore properly allowed. The patentee's addition to human knowledge is this: Ink is a fluid subject to evaporation and corrosive of metal; it is therefore desirable to keep the bottle, when not in use, tightly stopped, and to pour, through some nonmetallic substance, a thin stream. His device belongs to an old class of "pour-outs," wherein what may be called the bottle "cork" is perforated with an air passage and an ink passage,which register with similar pasages in a relatively rotatable spout; when in register, ink will flow out on proper tipping; when out of register, the bottle is tight. There is another commercially desirable thing which is effected by this device. Ink makers wish to sell as many ink bottles as possible ; therefore, if a "pour-out" is put on the full bottle, which cannot be replaced, if removed, the "non-refillable" bottle is produced. This was old, through the device of not inserting the stopper into the bottle neck, but of binding it to the bottle top by a tight metal band external to and uniting stopper and bottle top.
Deppermann's "embracing ring," "annular fastening member," or "two-part ring" is a metal band, of which the lower part holds firmly together the perforated stopper and the bottle mouth, while the upper portion—of reduced diameter—holds the registering "pour-out" in loose, and therefore rotatable, relation to the firmly fixed stopper. This "embracing ring" was a new idea; it made the stopper embody a new combination, and we agree with, the court below that it displays patentable invention. Silverthorne arrives at confessedly the same result, by securing to a "pour-out," or spout (old, as is Deppermann's), rotation relative to the stopper, by a "retaining ring" which fits loosely over the "pourout" base. But this device, as just indicated, and claimed in the quotation (supra) from Silverthorne's patent, will not fasten to a bottle by anything described; but (says the specification) it may be "fastened thereto by any conventional ferrule fastening device," and accordingly, in the actual thing complained of, it is secured to the ink bottle by a metal band, which grips both bottle mouth and "retaining ring" and makes all tight whenever the spout is out of register. Whether this identity of result is reached in the same way depends on finding first the inventive thought that vitalizes the patent, next asking whether the means of applying that thought have been appropriately defined in the claim, and then inquiring whether defendant's means are within whatever range of equivalents patentee is entitled to. [2] Deppermann's one inventive thought was to put into a structure, unitary when affixed to a bottle, the stopper, registering spout, and embracing ring; he did appropriately define that thought in claim 7, and did it long before Silverthorne; and he thereby made something new, ingenious, and apt for commercial success. Such an invention, like all others, is entitled to a range of equivalents commensurate with the novelty exhibited; and here the novelty is not great, but considerable. Defendant has sold a device which only transfers the loose spout retention element of Deppermann from his integral extension of the outside ring to a separate ring, which fits inside of the outer ring defendant actually uses. It has split one of Deppermann's elements in two; but the two parts are and must be joined in work, and when so joined do the same thing in the same way as does Deppermann's. It has been easier to describe what it complained of in terms of Silverthorne's patent; but that is mere convenience. We are concerned only with what defendant has sold; the later patent does not vary the legal problem. We therefore agree with the court below that infringement exists as to the seventh claim. [3] As for the rest the plain effort of plaintiff to "lick into shape" some new claims that would read directly on what a competitor had just put out, is not attractive, and justly leads any court to scan closely claims so composed. Lyon, etc., Co. v. Hartford (D. C.) 247 Fed. 524. affirmed 250 Fed. 1021, 162 C. C. A. 664. Claims 2 to 6 of this patent are to be read in the light of the facts, and strictly construed; but the procedure was within the letter of the statute, and they cannot be cast out, if they do naturally grow out of the specification. We think they do, if "two-part ring" and annular "fastening member" be taken to mean no more than the "embracing ring" of claim 7. Nevertheless infringement remains, because what defendant does is, even within a narrow range, the plain equivalent of the one vitalizing element bf Deppermann's invention.   Decree affirmed, with costs.

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK { 8~29~10} VERY RARE S.R. DEVINNEY & CO.                        MAYS LANDING N.J.

 

 

  BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  FOR 8~29~10 IS ANOTHER FROM THE COLLECTION OF ROBERT BIRO, WHO BY THE WAY LIVES IN SAVANAH NOT NYCITY AS I STATED IN AN EARLIER POST...THIS ONE DUG IN CHARLESTON SOUTH CAROLINA IN A 1850s PRIVY AND IS A VERY RARE BOTTLE FROM THIE MAYS LANDING NEW JERSEY AREA THE COMPANY WAS ONLY IN BUSINESS 4 YEARS SO THIS BOTTLE DATES RIGHT IN THERE. THAT WAS EASY, I AM STILL RESEARCHING COMPANY FOR MORE INFORMATION. THANKS ROBERT..GREAT BOTTLE.

S. R. Devinney & Co. Day Book, Mays Landing, 1848-52

 

 

 

 

 

 

TELL ME THIS PICTURE DOESN'T SEND YOU OFF INTO A DAYDREAM!! 

 

 

            

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK 8~22~10                                              VERY RARE G.O. BLAKE'S BOURBON WHISKY

 

     

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {8~22~10} A VERY RARE WHISKEY FROM G.O. BLAKE AND.............I DUG IT!!! THIS IS A VARIANT I CANNOT SEEM TOO FIND MUCH ON AS MOST I HAVE SEEN HAVE ADAMS & TAYLOR NOT MILLER & STEWART. mY UNDERSTANDING IS MILLER & STEWART WERE THE ONES WHO ORIGINALLY WENT INTO PARTNERSHIP WITH GEORGE BLAKE, SO THIS IS THE OLDEST VARIANT THEN ??? I AM PUTTING TOGETHER THE STORY OF THIS DIG ( A 4FT DEEP X 4FT WIDE X 6FT LONG)  PRIVY,BEHIND MY MOMS HOUSE THAT MY BROTHER FOUND FOR ME WHILE FIXING HER FOUNDATION. I DUG IT EMPTY AND BROUGHT HOME THIS AND SOME OTHER BOTTLES WHICH WILL BE IN THE STORY I AM DOING COMING UP SOON ON MY SITE. I DID THE BOTTLE DIGGERS DANCE ON THIS ONE I'M TELLIN YA. GROUND STAIN ONLY,PROFESSIONAL CLEANING WOULD MAKE IT RIGHT.........DAMAGE FREE ~ SWEET ! 

 GEORGE O. BLAKE'S BOURBON CO. KY. WHISKY (ENGLISH SPELLING) STEWART  MILLER CO.

George O. Blake was a junior partner in the J.H. Cutter Company from 1866 to 1871, He was in charge of supervising he rectifying and quality control operations. In 1871 he decided to establish his own brand. The new firm would include as partners G.R. Miller, and S.G. Stewart. The Pond-Reynold Company, established in 1868, was chosen to distribute the new whiskey from San Francisco. The Adams-Booth Company of Boston would handle the distribution from Boston and Louisville. The Adams-Booth Company would buy out the partners in 1876. Edward B. Pond of the Reynolds-Pond wholesale liquor house sold his interest to Samuel More in 1875 , who had been a junior partner. Edward Pond would become involved in the banking business and later serve as mayor of San Francisco.  “Spirits Bottles of the Old West.” Written by Bill and Betty Wilson, the volume is a font of information about the early American distilling industry. There the G.O. Blake mysteries are cleared up. According to the Wilsons, from 1866 to 1871 George O. Blake was a junior partner in the J. H. Cutter firm in Lawrenceburg, Kentucky. His job was to select good bourbon from distillers and oversee the “rectifying,” or mixing of raw spirits, to control the quality of Cutter Whiskey. As a result of his work for Cutter, Blake became a well-known and respected broker on Whiskey Row -- the trade hub of the American industry located in Louisville. In 1871 Blake decided to establish a brand in his own name. He formed a partnership with two wholesale druggists in Louisville and the Adams, Taylor Company in Boston to distribute the brand; the former to the Midwest and West, the latter to the East Coast. A third firm was selected in San Francisco to merchandise Blake’s whiskey in states bordering the Pacific. G.O. Blake whiskey did well all over the country, possibly as a result of advertising campaigns. In 1876, the Adams, Taylor Co. -- doubtless sensing the profits to be made -- bought out the brand ” bottle, crate and barrel” from the others participants, including George Blake, who subsequently disappeared into obscurity, Adams, Taylor, never distillers, continued to rectify Blake whiskey in Louisville, distributing it from there and from Boston.
COPYWRITE~Jack Sullivan 

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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {8 ~ 15 ~ 10}      RARE TWEDDLE'S CELEBRATED SOAD & MINERAL WATERS

 

CHECK OUT THE MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS GREAT SITE FOR MORE OF ROBERTS AND OTHERS AMAZING FINDS. THANKS 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS ANOTHER GREAT DIG FROM ROBERT BIRO'S COLLECTION. AN OPEN PONTIL "TWEDDLE'S CELEBRATED SODA AND MINERAL WATERS". THIS ONE DUG IN SAVANNAH GA.THANK YOU ROBERT FOR SHARING ANOTHER GREAT FIND.I FOUND INFORMATION ON THIS NEW YORK CO. AS HARD TOO FIND AS THE BOTTLE IT'S SELF..BUT I AM STILL LOOKING.I DID FIND THAT JOHN TWEDDLE WAS THE SON OF LONG TIME BOTTLER JOHN TWEDDLE SR. FROM CHESTER COUNTY JUST OUTSIDE PHILADELPHIA PA.  AND RELOCATED TOO NEW YORK STATE IN ABOUT THE LATE MID TOO EARLY LATE 1800'S.

IF ANYONE HAS MORE INFORMATION ON THIE COMPANY PLEASE SEND IT TOO ME OR ROBERT ~  robertbiro@mac.com

   

                                                   MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS SITE

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {8~8~10} JOHN LAMONT PATENT BOTTLE             BARRETT & CO. LONDON

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS A JOHN LAMONT PATENT BOTTLE WITH BARRETT AND CO. LONDON AS CUSTOMER,EVEN THOUGH LAMONT HAS MOST OF THE SPACE OCCUPIED!!! THESE ARE GETTING PRETTY HARD TOO COME BY,DATING TO LATER PART OF 1800'S THERE IS THE FIST HOLDING A BOTTLE ON FRONT AND A PICTURED LAMONT BOTTLE ON REVERSE WITH PATENT DOWN CENTER. THIS IS FROM MY COLLECTION.

JOHN LAMONT PATENTED IN 1876 HIS INTERNAL LEDGE MOUTHED BOTTLE WITH WOOD STOPPER (LATER CHANGED TOO GLASS) THE DETAIL .OF THE INVENTION CONSISTED IN FORMING THE INTERNAL NECK WITH A NARROW FLANGE AGAINST WHAT THE RING ON STOPPER PRESSES AGAINST SEALING THE CONTENTS. THE WOODEN BULLET STOPPER WAS PATENTED IN 1888 BUT REQUIRED A SPECIAL TOOL TOO REPLACE THE RUBBER SEAL WHEN IT FAILED,A TIME CONSUMING TASK. THEY WERE VERY POPULAR PARTICUALRLY AFTER 1890 WHEN THE PATENT LAPSED AS THEY WERE CHEAP TOO PRODUCE.  LAMONT BOTTLES CONTINUED TO BE USED UNTIL 1910 RANGE. THEY HAVE BECOME VERY COLLECTABLE. 

   

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {8~1~10} BLAGROVES AERATED MINERAL WATER ~ BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

 THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS EXTREMELY RARE BLAGROVES FROM THE COLLECTION OF FELLOW NEW YORKER ROBERT BIRO, THANK YOU ROBERT FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR INCREDIBLE FIND WITH EVERYONE. THE ROW OF INCREDIBLE COLORED JEWELS BELOW ARE FROM ROBERTS COLLECTION AS WELL....DAM!!!.  HERE IS A LINK TOO THE MANHATTAN WELL DIGGERS WEB SITE...GREAT SITE CHECK IT OUT.  MANHATTEN WELL DIGGERS

IF ANYONE HAS ANY MORE INFORMATION AT ALL ON THIS RARE BOTTLE OR THE COMPANY,PLEASE SEND IT TO ME & I WILL ADD IT HERE. THANK YOU.

"It's not every day that a bottle digger or collector of antique bottles gets to see a "Blagrove's / Superior Aerated / Mineral / Water / Brooklyn". In fact, the six sided, ten pin style Blagrove's bottle is a rare find indeed by any standard. Thanks to longtime digger and collector Robert Biro, a cobalt example can be seen below tucked between a truly staggering array of pontiled sodas and pontiled beers, mineral waters, etc. Rob discovered the Blagrove's in an old dump...on Long Island, in the early eighties." robertbiro@mac.com

Purpose of aeration
Sulfur compounds dissolved in water are not necessarily dangerous, but can give the water a bad taste or foul smell. These compounds can be removed in several ways, the most effective being by exposure to chlorine gas. However, aeration can also be effective if the amount of sulfur in the water is relatively low.During aeration, water is pumped into a non-pressurized tank and agitated. This physically removes many of the sulfur compounds, which are then vented. Exposure to oxygen in the air also oxidizes some of the compounds, creating atomic sulfur which can be filtered from the water.Aeration is also an effective means of removing radon from water. Small tanks and ponds for keeping aquatic animals such as fish or lobsters often rely on aeration to maintain sufficient level of oxygenation in the water. This can be achieved by pumping air into the water, allowing it to bubble to the surface; or by a fountain jet agitating the water. Both these methods create an agitated, large amount of surface area between the water and the air, thus allowing transfer of gases.Wave action on the shores of large bodies of water can provide aeration of the water in the vicinity, thus providing enhanced oxygenation which can benefit various aquatic lifeforms 
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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {7~25~10}                         SILVER SPRING BREWERY                          VICTORIA B.C.

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {7~25~10} ANOTHER GREAT BOTTLE FROM MY FRIEND WAYNE WAGAR IN VANCOUVER, PRETTY SCARCE TURN OF CENTURY BIM SILVER SPRING BREWERY, I FOUND SOME INFORMATION BELOW ON THE SILVER SPRING AND OTHER GREAT B.C. BREWERIES. THANKS WAYNE FOR A GREAT BOTW. http://www.theouthouse.ca/

SILVER SPRING BREWERY

EMBOSSED ~ PROPERTY OF-SILVER SPRING BREWERY LTD.-VICTORIA, B.C..  SSB Trade Mark. Mold blown with tooled crown top. Fairly scarce bottle. Quart sized, amber color  

This is but one example of the rich legacy of breweries that have operated in Victoria over the past 147 years. While both Nanaimo and Cumberland have also boasted breweries of note, Victoria was the dominant brewing centre on Vancouver Island with at least nineteen brewing facilities operating at one time or another between 1858 and the advent of provincial prohibition in 1917. It is also worth noting that before the ascendancy of the industry in Vancouver in 1898, our city was the major brewing centre in British Columbia itself. The names of many of our city’s early breweries are still recognized today; the Silver Spring Brewery, Bavaria Brewery, Phoenix Brewery, Fairall Brothers Brewery and the Lion Brewery which was located near Spring Ridge; others, such as the Pacific
Brewery, Tiger Brewery, James Bay Brewery, E & N  In physical terms, breweries underwent great  change in the latter part of the nineteenth century. Early breweries are often referred to as “horizontal.”
Usually only one or two stories in height and designed by the brewer himself, they relied heavily on pumps to move the beer from one stage of the brewing process to the other. By the late 1880’s “gravity” style breweries were becoming more common throughout North America and their appearance in Victoria became inevitable. These larger edifices, often designed by specialized  brewery architects, had tall, tower-style brew houses that utilized gravity as an integral part of the production flow. The style of these breweries comes most readily to mind for most people today. Some, like the largely wooden Silver Spring Brewery Co. situated at the corner of Catherine and Esquimalt Road in Victoria-West, while efficient, were more utilitarian in appearance. Others, like the second
version of the Phoenix Brewery, built in 1892 on Head Street in Esquimalt, and its major cross-town rival, the Victoria Brewing and Ice Co., were constructed of brick and stone  Another wind of change however was already blowing — consolidation. In 1928, as part of a nation-wide trend, the Victoria-Phoenix Brewing Co. and the Silver Spring Brewery Ltd. became part of Coast Breweries Ltd. This was a company formed  by Robert Fiddes and Associates to hold the assets of these and two other breweries, the Westminster Brewery Ltd. and the Rainer Brewing Company of Canada, located in Kamloops. In 1954, Coast  Breweries Ltd. became Lucky Lager Breweries which in turn was purchased by John Labatt Limited in 1958. They continued to operate the facility under the Lucky Lager banner until 1967 when the brewery began operating as part of Labatt Breweries of B.C. Ltd. Today, only the original brick engine room of the Silver Spring Brewery, which still stands at the corner of Esquimalt and Catherine Streets, remains to remind us of our brewing past, the rest of the brewery was demolished in 1961 after a number of years of inactivity
 

©  Greg Evans  2007  ( Executive Director of the Maritime Museum of BC).  

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK  {7~18~10} DR. KILMER'S COUGH CURE CONSUMPTION OIL 

 BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 7~18~10 IS FROM THE COLLECTION OF STEPHEN & DEBBIE HAUSEUR ~ Dr. Kilmer’s Cough Cure Consumption Oil ~ AND HERE IS A LINK TO THEIR GREAT SITE  POISONOUS ADDICTION   KILMER'S IS STILL IN BUSINESS TODAY !!!

The Kilmers of Binghamton, New York
~ By  John E. Golley 1997, Email:   ByGolley@email.msn.com

 This is the history of a family, a "patent medicine" company and ultimately, of a city. The Kilmer family started out in the small village of Cobleskill, New York and through several generations, influenced the health and politics of the city of Binghamton and made their mark upon the world.....this is their story.

Dr. Sylvester Andral Kilmer, MD was born in Cobleskill, New York on December 19, 1840, one of eleven children of Daniel and Maria Shaver Kilmer. He attended the log school in Cobleskill, the Schoharie Academy and then the Warnerville and Richmondville Seminaries. At the age of eighteen, he entered the office of Dr. Scott, a prominent Allopathic physician in Schoharie County. Wishing to get away from the "one school" idea, he then studied with Dr. Downing who had been called the successful pioneer of Homeopathy in the Schoharie region of New York State. Dr. S. Andral Kilmer started his own practice of medicine as county physician at Barnerville, Schoharie County. Following through with the idea of a broad acquaintance with medicine and surgery, he studied Eclectic and Botanic Practice with Dr. Patrick of Wisconsin. He attended the preliminary and regular course of the Bellevue Hospital and Medical College in New York City, where he had instruction at the Eye and Ear Infirmary on Blackwell's Island and other hospitals. He also received a special practical course at the Philadelphia Lying-In-Charity Hospital, where he received instruction in Practical Obstetrics and Diseases of Women; he also received similar instruction at the Central Dispensary of Chicago. He received further instruction at the Philadelphia School of Operative Surgery under the special tutelage of the noted physician Dr. D. Hayes Agnew and he also had a diploma from the Bennett Medical College of Chicago. After a successful tour of medical lectures and practice in the West, he settled in Binghamton, New York.   In Binghamton, he was first employed in visiting Binghamton and the surrounding cities on advertised days, in which practice Dr. Kilmer was so famous and successful that he was soon enabled to begin erection of his Laboratory buildings for the preparation of his remedies, which became necessary to supply the ever increasing demand. In 1878 his brother, Jonas Kilmer, moved to Binghamton to run the business end of the proprietary medicine business, and in 1892, Jonas bought out Dr. S. Andral Kilmer's share of the business. Their first major laboratory and manufacturing plant was located at the corners of Chenango and Virgil Streets in Binghamton. Dr. Kilmer prepared many different medicines, some of which were Dr. Kilmer's Ocean Weed Heart Remedy, Female Remedy, Indian Cough and Consumption Cure, Autumn Leaf Extract, U & O Ointment and Prompt Parilla Pills, but the most well known remedy was Dr. Kilmer's Swamp Root Kidney Liver and Bladder Cure. Swamp Root contained Buchu leaves, Oil of Juniper, Oil of Birch, Colombo Root, Swamp-Sassafras, Balsam Copaiba, Balsam Tolu, Skullcap leaves, Venice Turpentine, Valerian Root, Rhubarb Root, Mandrake Root, Peppermint herb, Aloes, Cinnamon and sugar and contained approximately 9 to 10-1/2% alcohol.  In the years prior to Dr. Kilmer's sale of his interest in the proprietary medicine business, during its growth and increasing professional services, Dr. Kilmer kept looking for a place which included the peculiar properties required and known only to him. He located such a place in Osborne Hollow, situated approximately ten miles east of Binghamton, where there was a sulpho-phosphate spring. He induced the townspeople to rename the area Sanitaria Springs and at a cost of $100,000 he built a Sanitarium and Hydrotherapium in 1892. The outside grounds were a well-arranged system of natural parks and the buildings contained every modern convenience of their time including electric lights, steam heaters and elevators. In addition to the sulpho-phosphate spring, there were ten others including the Blue Lithia, Red Iron, Black Magnetic and Ferro-Manganese. All types of baths were in use summer and winter, including Sulphur, Turkish, Russian and Electric. Dr. Kilmer's son Ulysses was employed as Associate Superintendent and a daughter, Edith, was the Librarian. Another of Dr. S. Andral's brothers, Andrew G. Kilmer, gave up his life work as a teacher ( He had been Associate Principal of the Schoharie Academy, Vice-President of the Franklin Institute, Principal of the grade school in Cobleskill and Principle of the Academy in Bainbridge, New York. He also organized the academy in Schenevus, with much success.) and entered the business office of Dr. Kilmer and Company and later, was the Assistant Superintendent of the Sanitarium. Andrew Kilmer was my maternal grandmother, Alice Cooper Kisselburgh's great-grandfather. She and her sister used to visit him and Uncle Sylvester at the sanitarium in the summer when they were young. It was also around this time that Dr. S. Andral Kilmer began formally treating patients for cancer, both at the Sanitarium and also at his Cancertorium at 254 Conklin Avenue in Binghamton. He advertised his cancer cure nationally and would pay train fare to the Sanitarium upon commitment of a stay of three to six months to effect the cure. He advocated a homeopathic approach to the treatment of this disease , which involved a controlled diet, treatment with the different springs as well as a secret medicine which, after a time, would cause the cancer to be expelled from the body; they would literally fall off. My grandmother and her sister had both been witness to these treatments and witnessed the results first-hand, and swore that they had seen the eradications occur. Dr. Kilmer was decidedly against plasters, radium, x-rays and surgery on these cancers as he felt that not only did they injure the patient, but they caused the cancers to be harder to treat and might even cause them to spread. At this period of time in Binghamton, there was a very heated clash between the traditional medical doctors and the homeopathic doctors; they wouldn't even work in the same hospitals together. Dr. Kilmer had been trained in both practices, but leaned more toward the homeopathic and allopathic teachings. This fact, as well as his ties to the proprietary medicine business, keep him under constant scrutiny by the "old school" doctors of his time. His assertions of having a cure for [graphic]cancer, which they felt was impossible given his methods, made him the brunt of ridicule by his colleagues. He offered to share his knowledge in the non-surgical treatment of cancer with them, according to conversations his daughter Hattie Marguerite had with my grandmother, but was his help was refused and rebuffed, and he was so professionally ridiculed by his colleagues, that he took the secrets of his "cure" to his grave. The patients who were treated by Dr. Kilmer held him in high esteem, and he was treating patients three days before his death of a cerebral hemorrhage. He died in his home at 44 Beethoven Street in Binghamton on January 14, 1924. Whether or not he had a cure for cancer is open to conjecture - my grandmother and her sister would both state a resolute yes, however, testimonials and the like, especially of that era, quite often are at best questionable; my only thought is...what if?  Dr. S. Andral Kilmer and Jonas M. Kilmer had two other brothers who were also in business for themselves. Augustus Kilmer established the Kilmer Manufacturing Company in Newburgh, New York which manufactured baling ties and wire fencing. Another brother, Thomas J. Kilmer, was a physician in Schoharie, New York and several old bottles embossed with his name are known to exist.  Jonas M. Kilmer was also born in Cobleskill, New York on April 11, 1843. He was a graduate of the Bryant and Stratton Business College in Albany, after which he worked for a year in the general store of Joseph Taylor of Schoharie Court House, and then worked the next eighteen years in the mercantile business in New York City with several different firms, rising to important positions. His brother convinced him to move to Binghamton in 1881 where he ran the business end of the "patent medicine" business as an equal partner. In 1892 he bought out Dr. S. Andral Kilmer's interest in the company, though some would say he "swindled" his brother in the deal; the purchase price is unknown. Jonas' son, Willis Sharpe Kilmer became the Head of Advertising for the company, and business began to increase rapidly. The company was incorporated in 1909 as Dr. Kilmer & Company and had branch offices in New York, Chicago, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil and Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies. In 1899, Jonas Kilmer was elected Director of The People's Bank of Binghamton, in which capacity he served from October 2, 1899 until February 9, 1907, at which time he was elected President; he served in this capacity until his death. On December 4, 1907 he was chosen as a trustee of Binghamton Savings Bank and also served as President of the Binghamton Press from 1904 until his death. People's Bank merged with Broome County Trust Company on April 20, 1914 and became People's Trust Company. From 1893 to 1908, Jonas Kilmer also served as a member of the Board of Police Commissioners. Jonas Kilmer died in Binghamton in 1912, but not without first giving all the credit of the success of the family business to his son, Willis Sharpe Kilmer.  Willis Sharpe Kilmer was born in Brooklyn, New York on October 18, 1869. He graduated from Cornell University in 1880 and went to work in the family business. Willis was put in charge of the advertising department of Dr. Kilmer and Company, which lead to a swift increase in business. Advertising in the late 1800's was not the "science" that it is today and Willis Sharpe Kilmer was one of advertising's earliest pioneers. His first wife was Beatrice Richardson who's socially prominent father was one of the brightest executives in a fledgling newspaper advertising agency in New York City. Willis Kilmer had a more metropolitan upbringing than many of his peers and his relationship with Mr. Richardson and his family connections all helped benefit Willis and his new ideas. Dr. Kilmer and Company utilized all the forms of advertising of the day including painted wooden signs, posters and printed circulars, but with the entrance of Willis' leadership, began purchasing ad space in newspapers expounding the virtues of their numerous cures and they were amongst the fore-runners in printing Almanacs, which not only would list the normal items such as moon phases, best planting times and the like, but at every turn of the page, listed one or more of the products, printed testimonials for the same and helped diagnose "ailments" of which one of their products would "cure". The packaging of their products was also easily noticed on the shelf. For ease of finding the correct cure, their Heart Remedy had an embossed heart on it, Swamp Root Kidney Cure had a kidney embossed on it and so forth, and their packaging was bright orange with the likeness of a whiskered Dr. S. Andral Kilmer printed boldly on the front. The package also invited customers to write to Dr. Kilmer for advise and prescription, which, long after Dr. S. Andral Kilmer had sold his share of the business, caused Dr. Kilmer to initiate a lawsuit against his brother and nephew in which he accused Dr. Kilmer and Company of representing him as the physician in charge of their medical department and also, that they pretended to give medical advice and prescribe medicines for diseases which they pretended to diagnose. When a lower court ruled against Dr. Kilmer and Company, Willis pursued the suit in The Appellate Court, and in 1917, the decision against the company was reversed. It was Willis Sharpe Kilmer's advertising prowess as well as his "muscle" via political and professional contacts that made Swamp Root a household word. When other patent medicines were losing popularity due to The Pure Food and Drug Act as well as an increased respect for medical science, Swamp Root was still filling the Kilmer coffers. When asked what Swamp Root was good for, Willis Kilmer once replied, "About a million dollars a year!". Patent medicine wasn't the only thing Willis Sharp Kilmer was involved in. On April 11, 1904, Mr. Kilmer founded The Binghamton Press, which became a very well-respected newspaper in the country. It has been alleged, although never proven, that he started the newspaper for the purpose of putting The Binghamton Evening Herald out of business and he could also control the advertising of various patent medicines and any articles condemning the same. There were several people such as Samuel Hopkins Adams, who were very much against patent medicines and were lobbying very hard for the passage of The Pure Food and Drug Act. Mr. Kilmer was very successful in "squashing" their stories and did eventually put The Evening Herald, run by his long-time personal and political enemy Guy Beardsley, out of business. Mr. Beardsley later sued Willis Sharpe Kilmer charging conspiracy to put him out of business; Beardsley lost the suit.  Willis Sharpe Kilmer was also a very fine judge of horses. The family mansion is still located on Riverside Drive in Binghamton, and on the surrounding grounds, Mr. Kilmer built Sun Briar Court, which had a 1/5 mile indoor track, an outdoor track connected to a half-mile circular track, 100 fire-proof stalls and the main stable included offices, quarters and a clubhouse. The Kilmer racing colors were brown, green and orange and he owned many fine horses; Genie- the son of Man O' War, Sun Briar, Sun Beau and Exterminator, which won the 1918 Kentucky Derby and was the leading money winner for four straight seasons. Sun Beau held the American record for money won until Sea Biscuit broke the record in 1939. Mr. Kilmer owned a large estate on the Rappahannock River in Virginia known as Remlik (Kilmer spelled backwards) as well as a game preserve near Binghamton called Sky Lake and he was a pioneer in forest and game preservation in New York as well as Virginia. He established the Kilmer Pathological Laboratory in Binghamton and started Binghamton's first nine hole golf course, which later became the Binghamton Country Club. Willis Sharpe Kilmer died of pneumonia on July 12, 1940 leaving an estate estimated at $10 to $15 million dollars, and is interred in the family mausoleum in Floral Park Cemetery in Binghamton, New York. After World War II, his second wife, Sarah Jane Wells, sold the rights to make and manufacture Swamp Root to Medtech Laboratories of Cody, Wyoming. The eight story Kilmer Building, built in 1902 after the original building was damaged by fire, still stands at 141 Chenango Street and Swamp Root was still on the shelves of the E. C. McKallor Drug Company in Binghamton in 1983 - it can still be ordered today, more than almost 120 years after it was first produced, a testament to the advertising skill of Willis Sharpe Kilmer and the strength of the Kilmer name and reputation.


BIBLIOGRAPHY
Binghamton and Broome County, New York, Volumes I, II and III, The Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1924  Broome County Historical Society Newsletter, Spring 1982  The Binghamton Press, June 30, 1983  The Sunday Press, July 24, 1983  The Binghamton Press, July 13, 1940  The Binghamton Press, January 14, 1924  The History of the Kilmer Family In America, Rev. C. H. Kilmer, 1897  Lost Landmarks of Broome County, New York, Marjory Barnum Hinman, 1983  One For A Man, Two For A Horse, Gerald Carson, 1961  Willis Sharpe Kilmer's Use of Advertising in the Promotion of Swamp Root, Annette Bakic, 1981  Dr. Kilmer's Swamp Root Almanac, 1930  Dr. Kilmer's Swamp Root Almanac, 1941  Dr. Kilmer's Red Book of Hope  Valley of Opportunity

CARTERS INK COMPANY STONEWARE JUG                                JULY 6TH~2010                               BOSTON 

FROM THE COLLECTION OF MY FATHER GARY MCCHESNEY,THE ONE WHO GOT ME HOOKED ON  BOTTLES AT AGE 12. HE PASSED 7~6~2010 ,HE WILL BE MISSED BY ANYONE WHO HAD THE PLEASURE OF KNOWING HIM. SO MANY GREAT MEMORIES OF SO MANY GREAT TIMES  

The William Carter Company, the forerunner of Carter's Ink, was founded in 1858 by Boston stationer, William Carter who, in order to supplement his paper sales, had started repackaging other companies' inks and selling them under his own name. In 1860, William Carter's brother, Edward Carter, joined the company and the firm became known as "William Carter and Bro."

The Civil War disrupted Carter's primary ink supplier, so William Carter obtained the use of its formulas on a royalty basis and started making his own inks and mucilage, which necessitated the move to a larger building. Another brother, John H. Carter, joined the company, which became "William Carter & Bros."In 1865 William's cousin, John W. Carter, joined the enterprise and the name became "Carter Bros. & Company." John W. Carter focused his efforts on the ink part of the business which, along with the sales efforts of James P. Dinsmore, resulted in such growth that the ink business was separated from the paper business and moved into its own quarters in 1868."

The entire firm and both of its divisions and their separate buildings were destroyed the night of November 9, 1872, in what has been called the Great Boston Fire of 1872. All that was left was the company's good will and its formulas.

After the fire in 1872, John W. Carter teamed up with James P. Dinsmore to buy the ink division and start a new firm known as "Carter, Dinsmore and Company." The new company thrived and by 1884 had become the largest ink producer in the world. Contributing to this growth was John W. Carter's belief in and commitment to research to develop new and better inks.

James P. Dinsmore retired in 1888, and John W. Carter drowned in 1895, which created an organizational crisis in the unincorporated enterprise, which led to its incorporation later that year as "The Carter's Ink Company.

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {7~4~10} RARE DOERING & MARSTRAND ~ VANCOUVER B.C.

 

ANOTHER GREAT BOTTLE FROM MY FRIEND WAYNES COLLECTION WAYNES GREAT SITE, DOERING & MARSTRAND. VERY RARE BOTTLE I FOUND THE INFORMATION BELOW, THANKS WAYNE ANOTHER GREAT BOTTLE.

DOERING & MARSTRAND Opened in 1887, the Vancouver Brewery was the largest of the local industries. The building, built circa 1904, once formed part of the Doering and Marstrand Brewery complex. It is one of the few surviving buildings from the early days of Mount Pleasant when waters from Brewery Creek used to run through the area. Over the years, a variety of industrial uses including a candy factory, dairy, ice plant, and a meat packing plant were located here. The rehabilitation of the building and extension to the rooftop monitor to create artist live-work studios was completed in 1993 by Kasian Kennedy Architects for Pacific City Land Corp.

Doering and Marstrand Brewery

The above named partners built the 2 structures that still stand at 280 East 6th Avenue and 263 East 7th Avenue, just east of Main Street. They were the first to have their own ice plant and bottling works when they constructed the buildings in 1886 and 1892 respectively. At capacity, the breweries were able to produce 1,000 barrels of beer and ale each month

Charles (Carl Gottfried) Doering Brewer b. Jan. 10, 1856, Leipzig, Germany; d. April 15, 1927, Vancouver. Educated in Germany as a machinist. Established Doering & Marstrand Brewery in Mt. Pleasant, later sold to Vancouver Breweries. Alderman, Ward 6 (1890-91). His Mt. Pleasant home was the first built south of False Creek after the 1886 Great Fire. His saloon, Stag & Pheasant, was on Water St. Later years spent with second wife, Mary Ann Joan Gerrie Reid (b. Sept. 8, 1860, Scotland; d. Sept. 1, 1940, Duncan, B.C.), a noted horsewoman, at their Hat Creek cattle ranch in the Cariboo.

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {6~27~10} W.E. HAGAN TROY NEW YORK

A GREAT BOTTLE , I AM GOING TO GET ONE FOR MY COLLECTION...ONE DAY. THIS ONE BELONGS TO MY FRIEND MARK {SEE HIS PAGE} W.E.HAGAN, TROY NEW YORK MID 1800'S PANELED MED. IN BLUE...SWEET! THANKS MARK.

William E Hagan was born Nov.24th 1826. His father a well known merchant from NYC.After finishing his education at Troy Academy he went under the emply of Charles Heimstreet a manufacturing chemist. Later completing studies in NYC and returning to Troy in 1854 a partner of his old employer, and on the death of Mr. Heimstreet succeeded to their drug business, which he finally sold to A. M. Knowlson. Mr. Hagan was one of a committee who designed the first successful steam fire engine in the United States—the well-known Arba Read, in 1859. In 1865 he opened an office in New York, and acted largely as an expert in mechanics and chemistry as applied to the arts. Having devoted much study to the subject of handwriting, his opinion as an expert has been often called for in court in many important cases of the kind in the United States. He has written many papers on scientific subjects, and is the author of the well-known work. " Hagan on Disputed Handwriting," published in 1894. He is a member of several social organizations, was formerly a member of the Troy Citizens' Corps, and is now and has been for ten years a member of the Troy Club. Mr. Hagan, besides being an expert in handwriting, is a wellknown patent lawyer, having an extensive practice in all parts of the country.

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {6~20~10} CRYSTAL SPRING / WATER SUPPLY ~ B.C.

THIS RARE BEAUTY IS FROM MY FRIEND WAYNE WAGAR'S COLLECTION IN CANADA,HE PICKED IT UP IN DEC. 09. THANKS WAYNE, NICE ADDITION AND GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. READS ~ "CRYSTAL SPRING / WATER SUPPLY" / GINGER BEER (WITHIN SCROLL) / VICTORIA B.C. TWO TONE, INSIDE SCREW STOPPERED, PINT, 12 OZ., 7 13/16" HIGH. PURCHASED YESTERDAY, IN COLWOOD. ANOTHER BEAUTY! I COULDN'T AGREE WITH YOU MORE WAYNE, NICE!

1872-1911 Morley worked for Thomas Shotbolt at his soda water factory in 1871. After learning the business, Morley started his own soda factory. In 1874, Morley took on J.K. Greenwood as a partner. Morley bought out Greenwood in 1881. Sold out to the Crystal Spring Water Supply. Christopher Morley also owned a soda water factory in New Westminster, B.C. from 1889-1891. This firm was managed by Mr. Joseph Henley

 

TAKE A MINUTE AND CHECK OUT WAYNES SITE, YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED.THANKS ~ www.theouthouse.ca

 

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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {6~13~10} ~ CONGRESS & EMPIRE SPRINGS ~ SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

The Congress Spring. This spring is located in Congress Park, opposite the southern end of Congress Hall. There is an artistic and very beautifu1 pavilion built over it to protect tne visitors from sun and rain, and, as it stands next to the sidewalk and near Broadway, it is easily found. The boxed and bottled waters are familiar to druggists in every State, and over all Europe. it is most generally known and used of any of the Saratoga springs, and has probably effected more cures of the diseases for which its waters are a specific, than any other mineral spring in America. It was discovered by a party of hunters in 1792, and was forthwith named Congress Springs, in honor of John Taylor Gilman, member of Congress from Exeter, New Hampshire, who wag one of the party.As soon as the properties of the water became generally known, the small supply obtainable from the natural overflow led the inhabitants to attempt making a reservoir. This, to their dismay, resulted in a total stoppage of the spring, which continued for some time. One of the first settlers, Gideon Putnam by name, while prospecting in the vicinity, observed bubbles rising from the bed of the brook, near whose margin the Congress Spring had formerly flowed. He dug a new channel for the stream, and, to his delight, found the lost waters bubbling up in their original purity. The spring was soon afterward rudely tubed with plank, and in 1823 it was first bottled for exportation by Dr. John Clarke, of New York, who purchased the spring and adjacent lands from the Livingston family, who held it under an ancient grant. In 1842 the spring was retubed. An ex • cavation was made which revealed the rock whence the water issued. The tubing was placed in the most careful manner, and by means of packing with clay a large supply of water was ob tained. The property continued in the hands of Dr. Clarke's heirs or their executors until 1865, when it was purchased by a company incorporated under the name of the " Congress and Empire Spring Company." This company owns the beautiful semicircular valley in which the Congress and Columbian Springs are found. The sides of this valley are still covered with forest trees, amid whose towering trunks are shaded walks, which af« ford a gay and fashionable promenade for the thousands of visitors who throng the great hotels near by. In connection with a recent analysis of Congress Spring, Prof. C. F. Chandler remarks, that " the superior excellence of this water is due to the fact that it contains, in the most desirable proportions, those substances which produce its agreeable flavor and satisfactory medicinal effects—neither-holding them in excess nor lacking any constituent to be desired in this class of waters. As a cathartic water, its almost entire freedom from iron should r.ecornmend it above all others, many of which contain so much of this ingredient as to seriously impair their usefulness." Prof. Chandler also remarks, that a comparison of his analysis with the analysis made by Dr. John H. Steel, in 1832, proves that the Congress water still retains its original strength, and all the virtues which established its well-merited reputation.

The Empire Spring. This spring is one of the first-class, and is located in the shallow valley that runs through the village, and in the neighbor hood of other noted springs. To reach it from Congress Hall, follow Broadway to the north to Lake Avenue, the fourth turn on the right. Follow this street down hill to the second turn on the left. This is Spring Street, and the large bottling house of the spring will be seen directly opposite the end of the street The spring is in a pavilion before the building. For full and reliable information concerning this spring, call at the office of the Congress and Empire Spring Company, near Congress Hall. Although the existence of mineral water in this locality has been known for a long time, it was not until 1846 that any one thought it worth the necessary expense of excavation and tub ing. At that time the Messrs. Robinson owned the property, and determined to tube the spring. The rock was struck twelve feet below the surface of the earth, and so copious was the flow of water that the tubing proved to be a work of unusual difficulty. It was, however, successfully accomplished, and the water flowed in great abundance and purity. It soon attracted the attention of medical men, and was found to possess curative properties which rendered it available in diseases which had not before been affected by Saratoga waters. It has proved itself adapted to a wide range of cases, especially of a chronic nature, and its peculiar value has become a well-recognized fact among medical men. Its general properties closely resemble the Congress, and it was for a time known as the New Congress Spring. The spring is now owned by the Congress and Empire Spring Company, which was formed by the consolidation of two other companies in 1865.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {6~6~10} BOLEY MANUFACTURING CO. BROOKLYN, N.Y.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS A HUTCH WITH EMBOSSING YOU DON'T SEE OFTEN ADVERTISING BOTTLE & DEMIJOHN MANUFACTURE. THE BOLEY MANUFACTURING CO. BROOKLYN NEW YORK IN APPLE GREEN. MANUFACTURERS OF BOTTLES & DEMIJOHNS.

 

 

 

Boley Manufacturing Company, of Brooklyn; to manufacture glassware; capital, $30,000. Directors : Frederick Lutz, J. A. Griffin and Benjamin Boley, of Brooklyn. Demijohns are the exclusive product of the concern. The executive committee of the Board of Trade secured an option on a portion of the old Chemical company land now owned by George Luther. Plans to build the new Demijohn Works were in progress. This would be a large glass bottle and Demijohn manufacturing plant that was expected to employ about 150 hands. B. U. Taylor would put up the new buildings. After the Demijohn factory was in operation they employed about 200 people with a capacity of 3,000 demijohns daily. On January 1, 1907, a fire visited The Boley Manufacturing Co. and the damage amounted to about $25,000. The Boley Glass Works, at Brooklyn, N. Y., was totally destroyed by . The factory had a 4-ring tank and operated chiefly on demijohns. Besides the manufactured stock, a large quantity of willow, used for covering the demijohns, was consumed. The works are being rebuilt on a larger scale than before and put in operation.

PATENT ~ 1,162,444—Benjamin Boley, New York, N. Y. Case for demijohns.

PATENT ~ 1,170,401—Benjamin Boley, Brooklyn, N. Y. Bottle protector.

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {5~30~10} J.J. THAMES DRUG CO.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS ANOTHER REAL NICE DRUGGIST FROM TOD CAGLES COLLECTION.

 

 

J.J. THAMES

TAYLOR.TEXAS

J. J. Thames, the subject of this brief biography, illustrates what a man ruay do in this country, even unaided, and in spite of adverse circumstances; how a man of energy and intelligence may succeed, from small beginnings, in building up a fortune and a name, by the right kind of application and determination. He had few advantages in early life, and no money, yet to-day, after a residence ot only six years in Texas, he has one of the largest and best paying drug businesses in the State, and a host of friends.

Mr. Thames is a native of Mississippi, and is a very young man to be so well and favorably known in business circles—being only twenty-eight years of age. He is a son of Joseph Thames and Mary Lavinia Green, of Mississippi, and was born May 9, 1861. His mother was a member of the Green family, so well known in Mississippi, and who came to that State as early as 1842, settling on what is known as "The Purchase," east of Pearl river. To his mother, who was a woman of uncommon intelligence and worth, Mr. Thames is indebted for his success in life, which was due to his early and careful training at her hands. His father was killed in battle at Iuka, Miss., and the subject of this sketch, then an infant, was left with his mother. To the raising and training of her only child this good woman devoted herself, and the foundation of his education he received at her hands. Later, he had the advantage of attending the High School at Crystal Springs, Mississippi. At the

age of seventeen she gave him a small start in business. Placing $500 in his hands he was told to make his fortune. This sum he invested in drugs and opened a little store at Wesson, a small manufacturing town on the Illinois Central railroad, in Copiah county, Miss.

Becoming dissatisfied with the very limited scope for business afforded in so small a community,—although he made money,— it being impossible to enlarge his business, Mr. Thames closed up his affairs and immigrated to Texas, settling in Taylor, Williamson county, in January, 1883. Before leaving Mississippi, however, Mr. Thames had become interested in one of the fair daughters of old Copiah, and winning her, brought her to share his fortunes in the new home which he should build up for her in Texas. Her name was Cynthia Bennett, a member of one of the oldest and most aristocratic families of Mississippi. They have one little child, Charles Egbert Thames, the light of the houshold. Mr. Thames, upon his arrival at Taylor, purchased property, and immediately begun the sale of drugs. He has prospered, and at present has $10,000 invested in business, which sum he is turning over and over with the prospect of becoming one of our richest, as he is one of the most successful men of the day. In politics he is a staunch Democrat, but has no political aspirations,—preferring to pursue the even tenor of a quiet life. He is a member of the Baptist church; is a Mason, and a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen.

Texas Pharm. Assn. — The 23rd annual meeting was held at Dallas. April 22—24. Some 180 names were added to the membership list. The amendment of the pharmacy law was the principal topic discussed. The assn. decided to withdraw from the N. A. R. D. Several papers are reported as having been read, among them one on "Adulteration" by J. Schrodt, who received the eight prize. The first prize was given to J. J. Thames for a paper on "How to make the drug business pleasant and remunerative."

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {5~23~10} RARE J.T.BROWN TORPEDO

YET ANOTHER FROM TODS GREAT COLLECTION,A RARE TORPEDO FROM BOSTON AND DATED TOO LATE 1800S ~ THANKS TOD !!

J. T. Brown & Co. have leased the three large chambers over their store, corner Washington and Bedford streets, to a prominent firm of clothiers. Joseph T. Brown & Co. FAMILY CHEMISTS, AND IMPORTERS OF DRUGGISTS' SPECIALTIES, 504 Washington, Corner of Bedford Street, BOSTON, Offer at REASONABLE PRICES a large and very complete Stock of FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC Selected especially for the RETAIL TRADE, THE SPRING WATERS Received FRESH, and for sale by the case or single bottle. "We have Spec1al Arrangements for obtaining these waters, and feel confident tbat we can give satisfaction in quality and prices. COMMISSIONS FOR IMPORTING Any article in the Drug or Druggist Sundry line, executed with despatch, and at low rates. PHYSICIANS' PRESCRIPTIONS Dispensed according to the United States, British, German, and French Pharmacopoeias, as ordered or intended by the prescribes PROPRIETORS OF The "HUB" EXTRACTS and COLOGNE for the Handkerchief! WINE, BEEF, and IRON, a nutritive tonic | CAMPHORATED GLYCERINE TABLET, for Chapped Hands, etc., etc. CHINESE CEMENT, BEST IN THE WORLD, 504 WASHINGTON STREET, Cor. Bedford, - - - BOSTON. J. T. Brown. J. T. Brown, Jr. C. H. Baasett,

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {5~16~10}RARE LOCAL MED. FROM GEORGE FISH, SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS ANOTHER FROM TODS COLLECTION FROM THE PAGES I AM BUILDING FOR HIM. THIS IS ONE OF A FEW VARIANTS OF THIS RARE BOTTLE. THANKS AGAIN TOD.

GEORGE H. FISH & SON ~ DRUGGISTS AND APOTHACARIES, NO. 104 BROADWAY SARATOGA SPRINGS N.Y.THIS FIRM HAS BEEN LONG AND FAVORABLY KNOWN HAVING BEEN ESTABLISHED IN 1850, THAT ANY COMMENDATION FROM US WOULD BE ENTIRELY SUPERFLUOS. SUFFICE IT TO SAY THAT THEY KEEP ALWAYS ON HAND A LARGE CHOICE STOCK OF DRUGS,CHEMICALS, TOILET ARTICLES AND EVERYTHING USALLY KEPT IN A FIRST-CLASS DRUG STORE. THEY BUY STRICTLY FOR CASH AND DIRECT FROM MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS. THEREFORE CAN OFFER SPECIAL INDUCEMENTS TO CUSTOMERS. PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO PERSCRIPTIONS & FAMILY RECIPES

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {5~9~10} SULLIVAN & SLAUSON PHARMACIST UTICA N.Y. CITRATE

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS A VERY RARE COLORED PHARMACY FROM TOD CAGLES COLLECTION. SULLIVAN & SLAUSON PHARMACIST UTICA NEW YORK IN AN AMAZING COLOR BLUE GREEN. WHAT A GREAT BOTTLE, I FOUND THE INFORMATION BELOW SO FAR. THANKS FOR SHARING ANOTHER GREAT COLORED PHARMACY.

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The old drug establishment at the corner of Genesee and Lafayette streets. Utica, for a number of years known as McMillan's drug store, lias been secured by Daniel J. Sullivan and John G. Slauson, and will be run under the firmname of Sullivan & Slauson. The members of the new firm are well known and popular. Mr. Sullivan was for years employed by John H. Sheehan & Co., and later by W. A. Teachout, but recently had charge of the prescription department of Crazier W. Hurlburt's drug store. He is a graduate of the New York College of Pharmacy. Mr. Slanson was for nine years employed by Howarth & Ballard as a prescription clerk. It is the intention of the new linn to remodel the store.Eugene A. Galock, for some time with Sullivan & Slauson, druggists of Utica, N. Y., has accepted a position with the National Cigar Stands Co. of New York. His territory will include New York, Massachusetts, and part of Connecticut and Vermont. He will continue to reside in Utica.

Pointers on Soda Fountain Conduct By Carl Burky

{ Manager Soda Fountain Department, Sullivan &• Slauson's Store, Utica, N. Y.}

A druggist doing business in a certain eastern city operates an old-fashioned tombstone style of fountain. Another store directly across the street is equipped with a modern up-to-the-minute apparatus, but, in spite of this, business is going to the competitor. Why? Because of the superior quality of the drinks and edibles served at the oldfashioned place. An attractive fountain is greatly to be desired, but it must be remembered that patrons base their judgment on what they get to drink and eat rather than on the up-to-dateness of the fixtures. It goes almost without saying, of course, that in buying supplies for the fountain only the very best grades of material should be purchased. Concentrations, fruits, nuts, syrups, extracts, etc., should all be of the highest quality obtainable. It is manifestly far better in every way to sell one hundred satisfactory sundaes a day and make only five cents profit on each one than to sell fifty that are less satisfactory and realize eight cents on each sale. Other conditions, too, have a bearing on the success or failure of a soda fountain. Platitudinous as it may sound, drinks that are meant to be ice cold should be served that way. Nothing disappoints a hot and thirsty patron more than to be handed over a drink that is insipid and barely cool. The same can be said of the patron who expects a hot drink and receives one that is lukewarm. These are little things to be sure, but they count big in the game of getting business.There are two ways to prepare sodas. The usual method is to place the syrup in a glass, and after dropping in the ice cream to fill the glass with carbonated water directly from the draft arm. Another, and, in my opinion, a better way, is as follows: Draw the syrup of the desired flavor into a 12-ounce wish to eat their ice

PICTURE OF INSIDE STORE IN UTICA 1890S --->

cream with a spoon and not drink it down. They do not want it mushy. The fountain that serves the best chocolate soda usually gets the lion's share of the business. Chocolate sodas are, by far, the most popular of the long line of fountain products. This being true, it is the part of wisdom for the druggist to serve the best chocolate syrup it is possible to procure. Here is a formula for a good syrup: Powdered chocolate 20 ounces. Granulated sugar 20 pounds. Water 2 gallons. Salt 2 drachms. Mix the chocolate with two pounds of sugar and put in the water. Bring to a boil and add the remainder of sugar and the salt. Allow to boil for five minutes, stirring continuously from the time the heat is applied until it is turned off. As in the case of sodas, chocolate is the most popular for sundaes. The appearance of a sundae has much to do with its taste. It should be served in a clean container, preferably a paper dish, and, while the dish should not be so large as to make the sundae appear lost, neither should it be so small as to allow the topping to run over the sides. The cone-shaped portion of ice cream should be hard. If nuts are employed a sprinkling only should be used—not an excessive quantity. Two cherries are sufficient, and water, plain or charged, should always be served. Chocolate bitter-sweet is a popular topping for sundaes. The following formula is used at one of the largest fountains in the country: Cocoa 3 pounds. Corn syrup AYt pounds. Heavy cream 1 quart. Milk 5 quarts. Add a little milk to the cocoa and cook the mixture until it comes to a boil, then add the corn syrup and stir to smoothness. Next add the heavy cream, stir thoroughly, and after allowing the mixture to cool, add the balance of the milk. To cool, place on ice. A chocolate marshmallow topping may be made according to the following formula. This mixture, if properly made, will not turn sour: Add one pint of cold water to one pound of cocoa. Stir and dissolve. Bring to a boil and continue boiling until a hard paste is formed. Stir fast to prevent burning. Then mix well with eight pounds of marshmallow. Chocolate also is the favorite among hot drinks. As stated before, when hot drinks are called for they should be served hot and should invariably be accompanied with a glass of water, a small plate of saltines or crackers and a paper napkin. For preparing hot chocolate this formula has been used with considerable success: Powdered cocoa 1 pound. Sugar 1 pound. Hot milk 1 gallon. Boiling water y2 gallon. Vanilla extract Y* fluidounce. Salt % teaspoonful. To the cocoa, contained in a suitable vessel, add Yi gallon of milk and stir until dissolved. Boil over a slow fire for five minutes. Remove from heat and add the remainder of the milk. Then add the salt, boiling water and vanilla extract. Without further cooking pour the mixture into the hot soda apparatus to keep warm. Serve in a thin china cup, topped with whipped cream. Another angle that must be considered in the question of soda fountain service is the need of courteous, polite dispensers. The quality of the personnel behind the soda counter is as important almost as the quality of the concoctions that are served. Neat appearing dispensers with clean finger-nails, clean-shaven faces and well-kept hair are a decided asset to any fountain. The soda dispenser should be of a naturally obliging and accommodating disposition and should possess enough gray matter to be able to cope diplomatically with occasional unpleasant situations that may arise. Cranks will inevitably appear and demand the impossible, and if these unreasonable people encounter other cranks behind the soda counter sparks are very sure to fly, to the detriment of the business. A smile of recognition, a pleasant word, and general congenial treatment in conjunction with the best soda fountain products obtainable are things that make a hit with customers. They are the things that convert the occasional customer to a permanent patron and increase the prestige of the store in the community

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THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {5~2~10} SMITHS PHARMACY , CHICOPEE MASS. IN COBALT

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A GREAT 8 INCH TALL EXAMPLE OF A 1870-80S COBALT PHARMACY FROM CHICOPEE MASS. THIS IS ANOTHER OF TOD CAGLES COLLECTION. I FOUND THE INFORMATION BELOW. ANOTHER BOTTLE THAT HAS IT ALL,THANKS TOD.

Warren, son of David Talcott Smith, was born in Vernon, Connecticut, October 7, 1836, and died at Chicopee, December i, 1903, aged sixty-five years. He attended school in his native town, and when a young man came to Chicopee to work in the drug store of his father's brother, Warren Smith. He went to Tuskegee, Alabama, a few years later, and remained there until after the beginning of the civil war. He returned to Chicopee in 1862, and was admitted to partnership by his uncle, Warren Smith. A few years later he embarked in the drug business at Chicopee on his own account, and was very successful in his venture. He had for many years one of the best and largest drug stores in the city. His place of business was on Exchange street; his residence 117 South street. He continued until the spring before he died, when he retired on account of ill health. He was an earnest, upright and manly citizen, held in the highest respect by his townsmen. He was interested

in public affairs, but never held public office. He was a member of Chicopee Lodge of Free Masons, and was a L'nitarian in religion. He married, 1864, Charlotte L. Smith, born at Warehouse Point, Connecticut, daughter of Hiram Smith, of that place. Children: i. Lottie Louise, married Dr. C. H. Prindle, of Chicopee. 2. Margaret Anna, married Harry H. Mclntyre, of St. Louis, Missouri. 3. Alice Washburn, married F. E. Volley. 4. Frank Warren, mentioned below. 5. Leon, married Catherine Jackson.

Frank Warren, son of \Varren Smith, was born in Chicopee, January 31, 1877. He was educated in the public schools of Chicopee, and graduated from the Chicopee high school in the class of 1893. He became a clerk in his father's drug store, and was associated in business with him until shortly before his death, when the father retired. Since then the business has been conducted by the son, who succeeded to the property after the father and founder died. The business has continued to grow and nourish. Mr. Smith is a member of the Oxford Club, of Chicopee. He is an independent Republican in politics, and a member of the First Unitarian Church, of Chicopee. He married, September 19, 1904, Annette Ella Hoague, born in Chicopee, daughter of John H. and Ella (Randall) Hoague.

Aaron, son of Aaron and Joanna SMITH (Ingraham) Smith, was born in Wilmington, Windham county, Vermont, in 1821. He attended the district school in Wilmington, and on leaving school, learned the trade of carpenter. After he became a master of his trade he obtained work in the Otis Mill at Ware, Massachusetts, and when the civil war occurred found profitable work in the armory and rifle shops of the LTnited States Armory at Springfield, Massachusetts. After the war demand for arms had ceased he returned to Ware and established himself as a carpenter, builder and contractor, and buiJt a large percentage of the houses erected in Ware after the close of the war. His contracts as a builder extended to neighboring towns and cities. These enterprises enabled him to accumulate a large fortune and to secure a number of fine building sites and other real estate. On one of these sites he laid out beautifully arranged grounds, planted a large orchard, and planned and erected a fine stone mansion in which he expended a large fortune and occupied three years in its building. Ill health cut him off from finish

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {4~25~10} RARE EMERALD GREEN JOHN L. GEBHARDT BOSTON MASS.

HERE IS A RARE DEEP EMERALD GREEN BLOB FROM THE JOHN L. GEBHARDT CO FROM BOSTON MASS. THIS HAS A PUSHUP BOTTOM FOUND ON WINE BOTTLES AND NOT OFTEN SEEN ON A BLOB. THIS ONE HAS IT ALL,NICE BOTTLE. OTHER THAN MR. GEBHARDT OWNING RACE HORSES I HAVE NOT FOUND MUCH ELSE....YET. I WILL UPDATE THIS WHEN I DO.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK {4~18~10} RARE CARL H. SCHULTZ EMERALD GREEN BLOB TOP, NEW YORK

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A RARE LIGHT EMERALD GREEN BLOB FROM CARL SHULTZ NEW YORK, EMBOSSED "CARL H. SCHULTZ C.P.M.S PATENT MAY 1868 NEW YORK"

Mineral Waters.

CARL H. SCHULTZ, 430-444 1st Ave.. New York, N. Y. Telephone call, 142 Madison Square. The only pure and correct Artificial Mineral Waters sold in New York City to-day.

 

 

 

 

"When you take a walk in Central Park, don't fall to visit the Mineral Springs Pavilion erected by the late Carl H. Schultz. The Springs offer a rare opportunity of combining a Mineral Water Cure with exercise in the open air. TM- Artificial Mineral Spring Waters served at their proper nlnjs »temperatures. Manufactured only with distilled water artiflcial & chemically pure salts. Prescribed by and used In the mperaturmiue9 ot over :200 leading Physicians in New York.

SHIPMAN, Circuit Judge. The existence in the commune of Vichy, in France, of numerous mineral springs, which have long produced water of high medicinal value, is well known. The water began to be sold as early as 1716, and became popularly known as "Vichy" or "Vichy Water." The republic of France is the owner of nearly all these springs, and by the terms of acts passed in 1853 and 1864 La Compagnie Fermiere de L'Etablissement Thermal de Vichy (hereinafter called the "Company") obtained the concession of the springs owned by the state for terms of years which have not yet expired. This company bottles at Vichy, and sells in France and in other countries, the waters of which it is the lessee, under labels which are its property, and of which the characteristic marks consist in the name "Vichy," and the name of the particular spring, and a woodcut vignette showing the "thermal establishment." In 1853 it began to export its water to this country, and in 1893 its shipments to this country were about 300,000 bottles. In 1896 its entire shipments amounted to nearly 10,000,000 bottles. The natural waters are exported in their original condition, and are not artificially charged with gas. In 1823 Struve, a German chemist, commenced in Dresden the manufacture of artificial mineral waters, by carefully analyzing the water of the natural mineral springs of Europe, and reproducing them with the same ingredients and the same properties, added from time to time to the scope of his manufacture, and included the imitation of the Vichy water, and his various products became widely known in Europe. In 1862 Carl H. Schultz, the testator of the defendant, began in New York the manufacture and sale of artificial Vichy water in accordance with the standard analysis of the Grand Grille spring by Bauer, an assistant of Struve. This spring was one of those owned by the French republic, and its water was considered to be of especial value. The labels upon the bottles in which the water was sold contained the words: "Vichy (Grand Grille). Carl H. Schultz,"—and also contained the words, "Carl H. Schultz's Vichy (Grand Grille)," and Bauer's analysis. This label was not in any respect an imitation of the company's label. After the commencement of this suit, Schultz changed his label so that it read: "Vichy. Manufactured by Carl H. Schultz,"—and contained the words, "Carl H. Schultz's Vichy, Compounded After Bauer's Analysis." This water has been usually put in siphon bottles, and has been continuously sold in very large quantities by druggists, vendors of soda, saloon keepers, and at hotels. In the year 1897 the output was about a million siphons. The bill in this case was filed against Carl H. Schultz on January 23, 1892. He died on May 29, 1897, and thereafter the complainants filed their bill of revivor against Louise Schultz, as executrix of his last will. After Decemher 31, 1892, until his death, his label on each bottle was as follows: "Artificial Vichy. Manufactured from Distilled Water by Carl H. Schultz." In the publications and advertisements of Schultz there is no representation that his water is natural Vichy, but, on the contrary, its artificial character is asserted, and his water has gained a high reputation from its accurate conformity to the analysis of the genuine water. By intelligent purchasers of his Vichy, it was understood to be artificial, and the distinction was well known by phy-. sicians, who prescribed one or the other article according to the needs of the patient; and ,while, undoubtedly, the use of the name "Vichy" by Schultz when his water was first introduced into this country diminished the sales of the waters of the complainants, and gave quick notoriety and popularity to the article which he made, it did not confuse in the public mind the identity of the two articles, because the one was a still and the other a sparkling water. The sales of artificial Vichy in this country far exceed those of the natural water. No complaint or remonstrance by the lessees or their agents against the use of the Schultz labels was made prior to the commencement of this suit."

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR {4~11~10} IS A RARE F.A. THOMPSON COFFIN POISON ,DETROIT MICH.

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THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM THE COLLECTION OF STEPHEN & DEBBIE HAUSEUR AND HERE IS A LINK TO THEIR GREAT SITE POISONOUS ADDICTION

THIS A RARE F.A. THOMPSON COFFIN POISON,THESE HAVE ALWAYS BEEN A FAVORITE OF MINE. I FOUND THE INFORMATION BELOW. THANKS STEPHEN & DEBBIE,GREAT BOTTLE.

FRANK A. THOMPSON, pharmaceutical manufacturer of Detroit, conducting business under the name of F. A. Thompson & Company, has built up a business of extensive proportions. The foundation for his success is thorough study, wide experience and clear insight into business conditions, and year by year he has developed his trade until it is now one of extensive proportion." Mr. Thompson was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 8, 1863, his parents being John W. and Zoraida A. (Torrey) Thompson, both of whom came to Michigan in early b'fo. The father was a native of the state of New York and settled on a farm near Ann Arbor, devoting his remaining days to agricultural pursuits. He died in Ann Arbor His wife passed away in California.

Frank A. Thompson is the only surviving member of the family. His early youth was spent on the father'^ farm and he attended the country schools, while later he was graduated from the high school at Ann Arbor. Hp next entered the University of Michigan, where he pursued a course in pharmacy and chemistry, completing hisstudies there in 1881, at which time he was graduated with the Ph. D. degree. Early in his business career he was connected with the Goodyear Drug Company at Ann Arbor, spending two years as a clerk in that establishment. In 1883 he removed to Detroit, where he lx>eame connected with the chemical department of Parkc. Davis & Company, manufacturing pharmacists, with whom he remained for about fifteen years, and during the last decade of that period he was chief chemist for the company. He then resigned and established business on his own account, organizing the firm of F. A. Thompson & Company, pharmaceutical manufacturers. The business was incorporated on the 28th of March, 1898, and Mr. Thompson was treasurer and manager of the company until 1910, when he was elected to the presidency and has so continued. The company manufactures various standard remedies and patent medicines recognised by the medical profession and employs one hundred and ten people. The motto of the house is to manufacture products of the highest quality and name the lowest possible prices consistent with such a standard. The firm's laboratories have a floor space of sixty thousand square feet, and it makes a specialty of bulk, fluid, solid and powdered extracts, concentrations, tablets of all kinds, oleoresins, powdered tobacco, private formulas and standard pharmaceutical preparations. The company sells especially to the wholesale manufacturing and proprietary trade. Mr. Thompson has had over thirty-five years experience I? analytical and consulting chemist, in manufacturing laboratories, in examining and assaying chemicals and in manufacture of general pharmaceutical products. The laboratories of the company have been especially built and equipped with modern and approved appliances for rapid and economical production, and they are qualified to meet every requirement of the trade. The business is now one of extensive proportions and the success of the undertaking is attributable to the broad scientific and practical knowledge and business enterprise of the presi(ent, who has ever been the directing spirit in the enterprise.

On the 31st of December, 1892, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Mary H. Campbell of Hamilton, Ontario, a daughter of Abner C. Campbell, and a niece of ex-Governor James E. Campbell of Ohio. Mr. Thompson and his wife are consistent members of the Episcopal ehurch and they occupy an enviable social position. His political endorsement is given to the republican party. He belongs to the Detroit Board of Commerce and in this ray manifests his keen interest in public welfare. Fra,r-. .ernally he is connected with the Masons and he belongs to the Detroit Athletic Club, the Detroit Boat Club and Ihe University Club, as well as to the Lochmoor Golf Club. He is also a member of the Michigan State Pharmaceutical Association and thus keeps in touch with the trend of professional thought and practice

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BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR {4~4~10} COLORED DRUGGIST ~ W.P. SMITH ATLANTA GA.

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THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS ANOTHER FROM MY FRIEND TODDS COLLECTION. AN AMAZING COLERED ALANTA GA. DRUGGIST FROM 1880S RANGE AND I'LL LET YOU FOLKS CALL THE COLOR !! THANKS TODD,AMAZING BOTTLE.

I AM CLOSE FINALLY TO GETTING TODDS PAGES UP AND ON,I WILL SEND AN EMAIL TO MEMBERS. THANKS

THIS IS WHAT I FOUND SO FAR......

THE SOUTHERN PHARMACEUTICAL JOURNAL September, 1911.
Atlanta, Ga.—«W. P. Smith, who has been in the drug business thirty-two years, has sold his store to Tipton & Company.

— J. T. Selman, who for the past three years has been connected with the prescription department of the Elkin Drug Co., Atlanta, Ga, has purchased the W. P. Smith pharmacy at 116 Capitol avenue. The store has been remodelled and will be operated as Selman's pharmacy. Mr. Selman was "raised" in a drug store, as his father, J. L. Selman, of Douglasville, has operated one of the best drug stores in the State there for a number of years. Young Mr. Selman is a college graduate.

DRUGGIST SINCE 1879

W. P. Smith, an Alanta GA druggist, started out recently on a collecting trip. He got lost and wandered about for six days and six nights in the mountains. He was found near Holsay, Ore., and taken care of by friends

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR {3~28~10} IS A RARE FIGURAL BOURBON FROM TURN OF THE CENTURY

THIS WEEK BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM MY FRIEND MARK PETERS AND IS IN THE FORM OF A HOG AND EMBOSSED ON SIDE "GOOD OLD BOURBON IN A HOG'S --> " WITH THE ARROW POINTING TOWARDS WHERE THE CORK WAS STUCK!! DATING TOO THE LATE 1800'S EARLY 1900S RANGE AND IN AN AWSOME COLOR.

Pigs were a sign of prosperity during the 1870's-1890's. The pigs were fed corn and corn was also used in the distilling of whiskey. The critters were cute and popular with the public so the distillers capitalized on these figurals as a marketable tool. The pig also represented the evils of drink. Using the cork to seal the contents at the rear allowed crude and rude jokes or slogans to enhance the product, for example "Something Good in a Hog's - - > (with the arrow pointing to the rear). Beside glass these pigs appear in pottery form. Anna Pottery from Anna, Illinois produced the famous Railroad Pig that goes for top dollarThe Kirkpatrick brothers who worked in Anna summed up their feelings in an article in the Jonesboro, Indiana Weekly Gazette in 1869:

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CONTINUED-> "It is rather a hoggish propensity to be guzling whiskey, and if the habit is indulged in, will son reduce a man below the level of the hog, and cause him to wallow in the gutter. Some of the popular pig designs include : 2 Bitters - Berkshire Bitters, and Sulfolk bitters both in amber, a "prototype clear blank suffolk bitters, pottery spongewear pigs, yelloware pigs, Amber and clear glass pigs with slogans "drink while it lasts form this hogs", "something good in a hogs -->", "Good old Bourbon in a hogs", "pure old corn" (pottery), "compliments of the Theodore Netter Distilling Co", Louisville Crescent Moon Whiskey pigs and railroad Annas, along with a number of local tavern and unembossed pottery pigs, make up a good selection to comprise a collection. The most common pigs (3 or 4) can be found in the $55-100 range, but then the jump is considerable being in the $250.00-$2000 range, this is a collection that someone could go "Hog Wild" over.

© Glenn Poch 1997

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK { 3~14~10} IS A RARE IRON PONTILED SOULT & ZERBE , LEWISTOWN, PA.

CHECK OUT JIM'S SITE ON LEWISTOWN GLASS AND OTHER COOL STUFF HERE> JIMS SITE

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A RARE IRON PONTILED SODA/MINERAL WATER FROM LEWISTOWN PA. AND PART OF MY FRIEND JIM MORRISONS COLLECTION.A REAL NICE PIECE THAT I KNOW HE HAS WANTED PRETTY BAD. THANKS JIM,GREAT BOTTLE.

Rick,

Here is great early soda bottle from the Central Pennsylvania region. Embossed SOULT & ZERBE/ LEWISTOWN/ Pa., emerald green, 7 5/8", iron pontil, c. 1855-1860. These are extremely rare, with less than ten examples known to exist. It took three years of searching for me to get this one for my collection. George W. Soult (1822-1882) and Henry Zerbe (1816-1876) formed a soda and mineral water bottling works in 1855. The exact location of the works is unknown, but it was probably located at 15 West Elizabeth Street, across from the Lewistown Foundry. Mr. Zerbe sold his share of the business in 1859 to pursue other ventures. Mr. Soult may have continued the business, either alone or with a new partner, but it likely dissolved in 1859 or very shortly afterwards. Soult & Zerbe is the only known trade name for the business. George Washington Soult was a Lewistown native and a graduate of the Lewistown Academy. A distinguished veteran, he served in the Mexican War. After his involvement in the bottling works, he was a Union army officer during the Civil War. Mr. Soult was wounded at the battle of Gettysburg in 1863, but recovered and finished his tour of duty. Henry Zerbe was born in Orwigsburg, PA. He was orphaned at a young age, and learned many trades on his own. Mr. Zerbe came to Lewistown in the late 1840s, and worked as a carriage builder and a Pennsylvania Canal boatman before forming the bottling works with Mr. Soult. He was a founding member of the Lewistown Water Company, and served as Mifflin County Treasurer in 1855. After retiring from the bottling business, he operated a successful mercantile establishment on East Market Street, Lewistown.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 3~7~10 A CITRATE FROM JOHN COLEMAN,NEWARK NEW JERSEY

HERE IS A VERY RARE COLOR PHARMACY FROM NEW JERSEY PHARMACIST JOHN H. COLEMAN. THIS IS A HARD COLOR TO EVEN CALL,BUT WHAT A COLOR.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS A RARE ONE IN THIS COLOR,DARK TEAL BLUE GREEN !!.THIS IS FROM TODD CAGLES COLLECTION AND I THANK HIM FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE IT . I AM SEARCHING FOR INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY AND WILL ADD IT AS I GET IT,GOT ANY?? SEND IT TO ME. THANKS

IT WAS LOCATED AT 380 BROAD ST,NEWARK N.J. AT TURN OF THE CENTURY.

LISTED IN 1885 AS A DRUG BUSINESS OWNER RESIDING IN IRONIA NEW JERSEY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR {3~1~10} IS FROM SYDNEY AUSTRALIA, J. PILKINGTON HUTCHINSON

ONE OF ONLY TWO HUTCHS FROM SYDNEY AUSTRALIA, J.PILKINGTON

I FOUND THIS:

HOUSE DESTROYED BY FIRE TRARALGON, Thursday.

Fire broke out this morning at the home of Mr. J. Pilkington, and, burning fiercely, demolished the building and the whole of the contents with the exception of a wireless set, which was saved. The fire had a complete hold on the house before Mrs. Pilkington was awak- ened. Hastily she aroused other members of the family, who escaped in their night attire.As there was no possibility of saving the property the brigade did not attack the flames. It is said that the loss is covered by insurance.

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS A VERY RARE HUTCHINSON FROM STEPHENS COLLECTION IN AUSTRALIA, J. PILKINGTON TRADE MARK WITH MONOGRAM. NICE HUTCH,THANKS VERY MUCH STEPHEN.

"hi rick add this one,one of two only known sydney australia hutchinsons super rare aussie bottle

known australian bottles
ht smith sydney
pioneer aerated waters 2 variations
boston aerated waters
j pilkington newcastle in blue pic on left."

THANKS VERY MUCH FOR SHARING STEPHEN,I AM STILL LOOKING FOR SOME INFO ON THIS COMPANY, ANYONE GOT ANY?. GREAT BOTTLE !

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR {2~21~10} GREEN BEER ~PHOENIX BREWERY CO.~ VICTORIA B.C.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM FELLOW COLLECTOR WAYNE WAGER IN VANCOUVER ISLAND,CANADA. A RARE PHOENIX PICTORIAL BEER.THANKS FOR SHARING WAYNE WHAT A GREAT BOTTLE.

"Rick,

THIS BOTTLE / THE PHOENIX BREWERY CO. / TRADE MARK /
PICTORIAL PHOENIX RISING FROM THE ASHES /
VICTORIA, B.C. / NOT TO BE SOLD

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FOUR PIECE MOULD, APPLIED BLOB LIP, QUART, 11 7/8" HIGH.
WHITTLED NICELY.
THE RARE PHOENIX VARIANT

Thanks again,
Wayne"

THE INFORMATION AT RIGHT IS FROM WAYNES GREAT WEBSITE WHICH I HAVE LINKED HERE~ WAYNES SITE

PHOENIX BREWERY

1858-JAN/1955, 1955-1958 LUCKY LAGER BREWING CO., 1958 WAS PURCHASED BY JOHN LABATT, LTD. APR/1959 NAMED LUCKY LAGER BREWERIES LTD. TO DATE, LABATTS BREWERIES OF B.C. LTD. STILL OPERATE. William Steinberger became Victoria’s first commercial brewer when he established the Victoria Brewery in 1858. Steinberger was from Germany, and he came to Victoria in search of his fortune in gold. He came with a great many other entrepreneurs, who all had the same goal in mind. Steinberger ended up following the path of a golden liquid rather than that of the golden metal he came for. Steinberger brought brewing experience from Germany and decided to look into setting up a brewery of his own. The gold seeker turned brewer secured a grain supplier in the Puget Sound Agricultural Company at Craigflower Farm. At this time the Crimean war was in progress, and thus the Company was no longer selling grain to Russia leaving them with a larger surplus of grain. Steinberger set up his brewery, in a small log building, at the nearby Swan Lake, where he also grew his own hops. So began the long history of the Victoria Brewery and brewing industry on Vancouver Island. Steinberger had found his goldmine in the brewing business. After one year of success at the Swan Lake site Steinberger moved the brewery closer to his market and built a new and larger facility at Discovery and Government Streets. Steinberger also obtained a partner at this time, Chris Oschner. Victoria brewery also switched to Spring Ridge as its water supply as Swan Lake was already known for its impurities Steinberger left the brewery in 1860 and Charles Gowen and Frank Laumeister entered the brewing business when they bought shares in the Victoria Brewery. By 1866, Gowen, who was also in the saloon business, was the sole owner of the enterprise. Gowen sold the brewery that same year to three new brewers, John Vogel, Jacob Loerz, and John Himmen who ran the brewery for four years. Victoria Brewery changed hands again in 1870 when it was purchased by Ludwig Erb and Joseph Loewen. Both men were from Germany. Loewen, like so many others, had arrived in Victoria via the San Francisco gold fields. Erb was a practical brewer who had attended brewing college in Belgium, and thus brought with him the knowledge that would make Victoria Brewery prosper. One of the major factors in the success of the Victoria Brewery was its contract to supply the imperial forces at Victoria with ale. In 1886 the Victoria Brewery was producing 150,000 gallons of ale and porter annually, the “greater part of which [was] consumed in Victoria,” while the rest was exported to the mainland and to the east (Daily Colonist, Jan. 1 1887). In 1891 the Victoria Brewery was incorporated as Victoria Brewing and Ice Company Limited Liability, with Erb and Loewen as provisional trustees along with Andrew Hemrich. The following year was an eventful year for Victoria Brewing. The old brewing facility was demolished and a new one built. The corner stone was laid in March and the machinery began operation in May. It cost the company $120,000 to build and equip one of the most modern breweries on the Pacific Coast. The new building was immediately hailed as "A Handsome Building." In 1893, Victoria Brewing and Ice merged with the Phoenix Brewery to form the Victoria-Phoenix Brewing Company Limited Liability. The trustees were now Joseph Loewen, William Parsons Sayward, Charles Gowen, William Wilson, and Frank Stillman Barnard. With the two smaller companies combined it would be possible to compete with the many other breweries in town, mainly the aggressive Union Brewery. The newly formed company used the new building on Government Street and slowly phased out the old Phoenix facility at Yates and Blanshard. In the summer of 1982, the old Victoria Brewery was torn down.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR {2~14~10} COMES FROM KAYLEE IN KANSAS, BROMO~SELTZER

Emerson Bromo-Seltzer Tower - Baltimore, Maryland
This historic structure, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was modeled after the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, Italy. It was completed in 1911 and has been a Baltimore landmark ever since. The tower was designed by Joseph Evans Sperry and built by Captain Isaac Emerson, the inventor of Bromo-Seltzer. The tower was originally topped with a 51-foot revolving replica of the blue Bromo-Seltzer bottle, which was illuminated by 596 lights and could be seen from 20 miles away. The four clock faces are all still working; however, the bottle had to be removed in 1936 due to structural concerns.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A GREAT LITTLE COBALT BLUE "BROMO~SELTZER" FROM THE EMERSON DRUG CO. IN MARYLAND.THIS COMES FROM AN EIGHT YEAR OLD COLLECTOR IN KANSAS.

"Dear mr ricksbottleroom my dad said he thought maybe this was not a really rare bottle but my grampa and me found it way under ground behind his oldd barn and its my favorite because its blue and my grandpa helped me find it.and my dad got me a picture thanks alot if you make it this week bottle. Kaylee, from Kansas usa

WELL..THANK YOU VERY MUCH KAYLEE FROM KANSAS, I HAVE FOUND QUITE A FEW OF THEM SINCE I WAS YOUR AGE AND I DON'T THINK I HAVE EVER SEEN ONE AS NICE AS YOURS. I ADDED A PICTURE AND STORY ABOUT THE BROMO~SELTZER BUILDING IN MARYLAND FOR YOU TO CHECK OUT,KEEP ON COLLECTING, AND THANKS AGAIN FOR SHARING YOUR GREAT FIND WITH US.

THE BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR {2~7~10} PONTILED HENRY'S VERMONT LINIMENT

John M. Henry,
began his career in proprietary medicines
by offering “Henry’s Vermont Liniment”.
An early advertisement described it as
“The Best Pain Killer in the World”, and
warranted it to be unsurpassed for
“Rheumatism, Inflammation, Cramps,
Sprains, Bruises, Cuts, Burns, Flesh
Wounds, Spasms, Toothache, Sudden
Coughs, Colds, Bowel Complaints,
Dysentery, etc.”Soon afterward, Mr. Henry expanded his
business to become the wholesale agent,
and later the manufacturer of “Reverend
N.H. Downs Vegetable Balsamic Elixir”,
a 25-year old remedy for coughs, colds,
and diseases of the throat and lungs.
By 1867, the fledgling firm, now known
as Henry & Company, had grown to
recognized stature as the sole proprietor
and manufacturer of several dozen
medicines, ointments, dyes and flavoring
extracts. In addition, the firm had taken over wholesale distribution of numerous
other patent medicines from other manufacturers.manufacturers. Some of the more popular
“Professor Mott’s Magic Hair
Invigorator”, from Highgate, Vermont,
“Newton’s Panacea” and “Newton’s
Jaundice Bitters”, from Norwich, Vermont,
and “Dr. Boyce’s Tonic Bitters”, from
Rutland, Vermont. In March of 1867, the firm moved from Waterbury to a small building on Church Street in Burlington and continued its dual role as wholesale druggist and manufacturer of patent medicines. Over the next five years, there were several splits, with Henry & Company eventually ending up as three businesses: John F. Henry & Co. of New York; Henry, Johnson & Lord of Burlington; and Wells, Richardson & Co.of Burlington.

THIS WEEKS BOTW IS FROM JOHN IN VERMONT,A RARE PONTILED VERMONT LINIMENT FROM HENRY'S.THIS MAN BUILT AN EMPIRE.SEE WHAT I FOUND ON THE LEFT

"Rick-here are a couple of pictures....being a Vermonter , this bottle is special to me.... I believe tis bottle was made in late 1850's, early 1860's"

AM ALWAYS AMAZED WHEN YOU ARE LUCKY ENOUGH TO FIND GREAT OLD GLASS WITH ORIGINAL LABELS,THATS AN OLD LABEL !!

THANKS JOHN FOR LETTING US ENJOY YOUR GREAT FIND

 

 

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR { 1~31~10} GRAVITATING STOPPER FROM T.E. HICKEY,PROVIDENCE R.I.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM DEAN MARVELS COLLECTION. THIS IS A RARE BOTTLE AND 1 OF MAYBE A HANDFULL KNOWN. HE WAS ALSO ABLE TO OBTAIN GREAT INFORMATION WHICH FOLLOWS COMPLIMENTS OF LITTLE RHODY BOTTLE CLUB

THANKS VERY MUCH DEAN FOR ANOTHER GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK.

T. E. Hickey
T. Edward Hickey began manufacturing soda in 1872. In 1874 he became the successor to Edward Postens (E. Postens & Co.) and was listed as a soda manufacturer at 10 Planet Street at the corner of South Main Street in Providence
.

Hickey also manufactured and bottled soda waters, mineral waters, sarsaparilla, and Belfast Ginger Ale in patented Glass Stopper Bottles. He sold cider, ale, porter, and lager beers as well.

In 1879, Hickey joined with William H. Pierce to form T. E. Hickey & Co. which was located at 10 Planet Street. They produced soda and mineral waters until 1902
.© LRBC

Hi Dean!

Your Hickey is pretty rare. On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the rarest, I would rate your bottle as a 9. The only time I would rate a RI bottle as a 10 is if there was only one known. I have only seen or heard of three other Hickeys like yours and am not aware of any actual prices realized from sales or auctions so monetary value would be a guess. Hickey took over the E. Postens Company circa 1874 and ran it alone for about five years. In 1879 he joined with William Pierce and the company became T.E. Hickey & Co. Your bottle does not have & Co. on it so I would say it is from the 1874 and 1879 period. The limited info I have on Hickey can be found on our website here: HICKEY RESEARCH You are free to use or download any info on the page and/or our site as long as credit is given to the club.

My thoughts on monetary value are as follows: The E. Postens gravitating stopper bottles are selling on Ebay for about $150.00 in excellent condition so your Hickey would be around that. However, knowing the rarity and being a RI collector, I would put the value closer to the $200.00 range. Please take that for what it's worth as I have a tendency to under value everything so I very well could be lowballing the estimate but $200 is a good starting point.,

Regards,Dave

David Andrews Site Administrator, Little Rhody Bottle Club Editor, Antique Bottles of Rhode Island

THANKS TO LITTLE RHODY BOTTLE CLUB FOR THE GREAT INFO, VISIT THEIR SITE FROM THE LINK ON THIS PAGE OR FROM MY LINKS PAGE

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR (1~24~10) RARE LAUGHLINS & BUSHFIELD DRUGGISTS WHEELING VA

* IF ANYONE HAS MORE INFORMATION ON THIS DRUGGIST PLEASE SEND ME AN EMAIL ,I AM STILL HUNTING.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM THE COLLECTION OF MIKE CIANCIOSI FROM VIRGINIA. A VERY HARD TO GET PONTILED DRUGGIST FROM WHEELING VIRGINIA, ~"LAUGHLINS & BUSHFIELD DRUGGISTS WHEELING VA." ~ IT WOULD DATE TO AT VERY LEAST 1862, AS WEST VIRGINIA GOT ITS STATEHOOD IN 1863. I REALLY LIKE THIS BOTTLE IT'S GOT CLASS, THANKS MIKE FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE IT.
********************** Rick, "Here are some photos of my Laughlins & Bushfield bottle. It's probably the oldest drugstore bottle in my collection.
It's 6.5 inches tall, and embossed vertically:
"LAUGHLINS & / BUSHFIELD / DRUGGISTS / WHEELING VA".
It has what appears to be an iron-pontil scar on the bottom.
I got it from a Glass Works Auction (
GLASSWORKS AUCTIONS ) that ended August 3rd, 2009: I don't have much information on Laughlins & Bushfield.
I saw a reference on the web to a lawsuit in 1867, where it listed their full names as Alexander Laughlin and Samuel Bushfield. They were suing "Stone & Lyle" over some kind of debt.
I've also seen references to "Laughlin & Bros." and "Laughlin Smith & Co.", both listed as wholesale druggists in Wheeling WVA (post civil war).That's all I got." Mike.

THANKS AGAIN MIKE FOR A GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK.

MIKE IS A MEMBER OF THE POTOMIC BOTTLE COLLECTORS CLUB,NICE SITE,CHECK IT OUT HERE~POTOMIC BOTTLE COLLECTORS CLUB SITE

MIKE HAS A GREAT SITE OF HIS OWN MAKE SURE AND CHECK IT OUT VIRGINIA DRUGSTORE BOTTLES

I FOUND THIS INFORMATION, SEEMS THESE GENTLEMEN WERE ALSO INTO OTHER BUSINESS IN WEST VIRGINIA,THE ARTICLE BELOW IS DATED JANUARY, 1866, 3 YEARS AFTER W.V. GOT STATEHOOD.

WHEELING PETROLEUM AND MINING COMPANY.

I, J. Edgar Boyers, secretary of the state of West Virginia, hereby certify that an agreement duly acknowledged and accompanied by the proper affidavits, has been this day delivered to me; which agreement is in the words and figures following:

"The undersigned agree to become a corporation by the name of the 'Wheeling Petroleum and Mining Company,' for the purpose of procuring property in the county of Ohio, state of West Virginia, and elsewhere; and upon said property to bore, mine or excavate for coal, salt, coal, rock, carbon or petroleum oils, or any other minerals or mineral substances or fluids ; which corporation shall keep its principal office or place of businsss at Wheeling, in the county of Ohio, and it is to expire on the first day of March, Anno Domini, eighteen hundred and eighty-five. And for the purpose of forming the said corporation, we have subscribed the sum of ten thousand dollars to the capital thereof, and have paid in on said subscriptions the sum of one thousand dollars, and desire the privilege of increasing the said capital by sales of additional shares, from time to time, to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars in all. The capital so subscribed is divided into shares of fifty dollars each, which are held by the undersigned, respectively, as follows, that is to say: by Thomas H. Logan, twenty shares; by James M. Dillon, twenty shares ; by John E. Wilson, twenty shares ; by Alexander Laughlin, ten shares ; by George K. Wheat, thirty shares ; by Samuel B. Bushfield, ten shares ; by Samuel Laughlin, ten shares ; by John R. Hubbard, five shares ; by Joseph Seybold; ten shares ; by Henry K. List, twenty shares ; by Archibald W. Campbell, ten shares ; by John P. McDermot, ten shares ; by Samuel Irwin, ten shares, and by John List, fifteen shares ; all of which persons above named are residents of the city of Wheeling ; and the capital to be hereafter sold is to be divided into shares of the like amouut. "Given under our hands this first day of March, eighteen hundred and sixty-five.

[Signed,] Thomas H. Logan, James M. Dillon, John B. Wilson, Alexander Laughlin, George K. Wheat, Samuel B. Bushfield, Samuel Laughlin, Jno. R. Hubbard, Samuel Irwin, Henry K. List, Archibald W. Campbell, John F. Mcdermot, * Joseph Seybold, John List.

" Wherefore, the corporators named in the said agreement, and who have signed the same, are hereby declared to be from this date until the first day of March, eighteen hundred and eighty-five, a corporation by the name and for the purposes set forth in the said agreement. Given under my hand and the great seal of the said state, at Wheeling, this second day of March, eighteen hundred and sixty-five.

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR (1~17~10) RARE COLOR P. MAUE CO. HAZELTON PENNSYLVANIA

 

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM PAMELA HEGEDUS COLLECTION,A RARE COLOR BLOB FROM 1880S ERA AND WHAT A GEM, SHE MADE MY JOB EASY THIS WEEK AS SHE GOT THE STORY ABOUT FINDING THIS GREAT BOTTLE IN A.B.G.C.,THANKS VERY MUCH PAMELA FOR SHARING A GREAT FIND.

"This bottle is a RARE citron colored blob top beer from Hazelton Pa. This was a find when I was digging at a supposed "haunted house" dump locally, in northern Pa. I wrote a story for the "Antique Bottle & Glass Collector in 2008 about the "Ghost Dump", which was published and showed this bottle being one of the "finds". I received many phone calls and e-mails asking if this bottle was for sale. The bottle is in near mind condition, surprisingly enough, and is embossed: P. MAUE HAZELTON PA."
Pamela Hegedus (nickname:Bottlecindy)
Susquehanna Pa.

******************************************************************************************

A GHOSTLY DIG

By Pamela Hegedus ,Susquehanna, Pa.

Our tale begins in the heat of the summer--the day we decided to take a drive around the area and check out some of the places we had seen vacant over the months. Our main focus was an old deserted beef farm, close to a town which was situated about thirty miles from what I call home, as well as an old house and shell of a schoolhouse. Down the road from the farm and other building, there is an old store which is as creepy as ever, the inside looking as ancient as the outer section. In the days to follow our first investigation of the old property (and yes, we got permission) we encountered some rather "interesting" occurences in addition to a memorable dig.

 

 

My youngest son, Colin and I decided we would drive up the road first, scanning the woods for possibly dumping areas. We knew the farm had been used from the mid 1800's and the old house, now collapsed and just a rubble of a building, was part of a small town school. We considered the possibility of perhaps finding some old inkwells around that building.

 

 

 

First, we drove along the country lane, past the house and farm. The barn and outbuildings were on one side of the road, and the shell of a house and school on the other. The woods looked uninteresting, but we figured we would do a more thorough check later, after we had explored the buildings. Walking up the dirt path leading to the house, I scouted along the edges of the stone wall, overturning rocks and finding two local sodas and a small size Pond's Extract. Colin yelled for me to come up the steep path to the house, which was overgrown with brush and stinging burdocks. The steps were broken sections of rock sticking out of weeds. All of a sudden, I felt a sting like a wasp, then realized it was not an animal but a plant which I had run into. My arm burned like fire! I smarted for a few minutes, then continued to my venture through heavy brush and up towards where my so was digging. Colin showed me an amber remedy bottle for mange, common but a keeper. He had found it under some rotted boards, along with a pair of well worn leather baby shoes. He showed me two nice blob beers, one in citron, complete with the original stopper, the other one plain aqua and having some damage. He said he had met up with an older fellow who showed him where to look. I asked him where he had gone, and he pointed up towards the hill. No one was in sight. It had taken me about half an hour to catch up with Colin, as I spent some time moving those rocks along the wall. I hadn't heard any voices but then the highway was in the distance and I could hear large trucks rumbling and crows squawking in the field. I had a hard time hearing Colin calling for me to come to where he was digging, so I would never have heard voices unless they talked loudly. He told me, too, that we needed to go across to the old schoolhouse and dig in the small grove of trees behind it. He claimed the "old fellow" had told him that was where they dumped the old glass. I didn't see any old guy? We spent the next four hours digging in what was the old dump, uncovering medicines like SAVE-THE-HORSE SPAVIN CURE and an opened pontilled DR TOBIAS, NEW YORK, VENETIAN HORSE LINIMENT and about twenty other embossed medicines, eight local sodas, a few more common inks and the prize of all--a cross-shaped holy water bottle. We cleaned up as best we could, loaded the car, and took a quick walk across the road and field to the barn. Other than an old glass shade from a lamp, we didn't see a spot of glass.

 

We drove to the corner store for some cold drinks, and after we made our purchases and returned to the car, ready to head home when said "That's the guy!" I glanced to the porch of the store to see a shadowy figure of a man dressed in old-fashioned dress. The apparition faded quickly into the air, as dusk began to settle over the rural countryside. We wondered if we had just seen a ghost, or if indeed this had been the same fellow my son had seen and had led him to the old bottle dump. I guess we will never know. That autumn we returned three more times and found about thirty more decent bottles. We still have digging to do around the house itself, but that will have to wait until spring.....

Antique Bottle and Glass Collector magazine ©

THANKS AGAIN PAMELA FOR SHARING YOUR GREAT FIND & STORY WITH US. RICK.

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK (1~10~10) M.J.GUSHUE, SOUTH AMBOY NEW JERSEY

"A digging friend gave me for my birthday a M.J. Gushue hutchinson. It is from South
Amboy N J. Light blue tint, mug base with the orignal stopper. It had to have
been in an attic because it is pristine. The rubber seal is like new. Any info
would be great, i have searched for it but nothing. Also, the embossing in the
middle MJG"

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM THE COLLECTION OF H.HARRISON, M.J.GUSHUE SOUTH AMBOY,NEW JERSEY WITH MONOGRAM & MUG BASE. NICE BOTTLE AND GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. MY KIND OF BIRTHDAY PRESENT!! THANKS VERY MUCH FOR SHARING.

FROM 1913 S.AMBOY NEWS

"Solicitor Pearse stated the council could not transfer license from one building to-another only in April,1913 when licenses are granted, and therefore. M. J. Gushue and Slg. Emilllussen could not have their licenses transferred to another building at this time."

ALL I FOUND...SO FAR,STILL LOOKING.

* ANYONE HAS ANY ADS OR INFO ABOUT THIS COMPANY/BOTTLE PLEASE DROP ME AN EMAIL,THANKS.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 1~3~10 STONEWARE FROM DONALDSON & COLLINS, AUSTRALIA.

"A large company operated from 1901 to 1925 on wellington street.they joined another company called bcd in 1927.one of western Australias top 5 biggest cool drink factorys,had codds,ginger beers,crown seals"

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM OUR FRIENDS DOWN UNDER, STEPHEN HARMAN. A REAL NICE "DONALDSON & COLLINS STONEWARE LTD.PERTH,FREMANTLE & NORTHHAM". HE DUG THIS ONE RECENTLY,GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK, THANKS FOR SHARING IT WITH US.

***********************************************

N.B.~ "THE B.C.D. BRAND IS NOW SO FAVOURABLY KNOWN,THIER MINERAL WATERS BEING CONSUMED IN CLUBS(?) AND MANY OF THE LEADING HOTELS THAT FURTHER COMMENT IS NOT NECASSARY."

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 12~27~09 TEAL GREEN LOUIS HECHLER DRUGGIST OHIO~1870-80'S

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK (12~27) IS FROM THE TODD CAGLE COLLECTION, A VERY RARE TEAL DRUGGIST FROM LOUIS HECHLER DRUGGIST CLEVELAND,OHIO. DATED TO THE LAST QUARTER OF THE 1800'S ,THIS BOTTLE HAS IT ALL. THANKS TODD CAGLE FOR SHARING IT WITH US.I AM IN THE PROCESS OF MAKING A PAGE(MAYBE 2) OF MY FRIEND TODD CAGLES AMAZING COLORED PHARMACY BOTTLE COLLECTION. PLEASE WATCH FOR THAT AS IT IS VERY IMPRESSIVE TO SAY THE LEAST!!!!

 

 

I FOUND THIS: George Louis Hechler—Another stalwart member of the 0. S. P. A. in the early days, and one of the first to extend the hand of professional fellowship to the writer, was George Louis Hechler, of Cleveland.Mr. Hechler, when a boy, came to this country from Germany, the land to which we have been indebted for so many of our best and most useful citizens. He was a typical example of those who, while retaining in their hearts treasured memories of the Fatherland, have devoted themselves with truest loyalty to the upbuilding of the land of their adoption, which they regarded as the land of opportunity, of equal privilege and of fair play. Mr. Hechler was elected to membership at the second meeting of this Association, held in 1880, and from that time onward never lost an opportunity to advance its welfare. He was also a member of the A. Ph. A. and attended many of its meetings.He was appointed to the State Hoard of Pharmacy in 1S8S and served in that capacity until he resigned in 1893. He was elected President of the O. S. P. A. at the Findlay meeting in 1893, and presided at the meeting in Cincinnati in 1894, the first meeting attended by the writer. He was one of the organizers of the National Association of Retail Druggists and was, I believe, one of the vice presidents of that organization. His standing in his home city of Cleveland is indicated by the fact that he was Commissioner of Fire in the Mayor's Cabinet for one or more terms.In addition to conducting a highly successful drug business, he was a large investor in woolen mills, and achieved a comfortable fortune. All in all he was a strong, sensible, vigorous minded, modest, kindly man; a good pharmacist, a good citizen, and a friend whom it is a privilege to have known.

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 12~20~09, SCARCE ERROR HUTCH FROM NEW JERSEY,LATE 1800'S

DEAN IS A COLLECTOR OF PHARMACIES AS WELL AS OTHER BOTTLES.I AM WORKING ON A 50 STATES OF PHARMACIES PAGE WITH ONE FROM EVERY STATE OUT OF DEANS COLLECTION LISTED,SO STAY TUNED FOR THAT. THANKS AGAIN DEAN.

**********************************

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM THE COLLECTION OF DEAN MARVEL.A VERY HARD TO GET HUTCH FROM J.F. ZIMMER,GLOUCESTER NEW JERSEY,WITH THE SLUG PLATE (EMBOSSING)UPSIDE DOWN.!

THIS MAKES IT PRETTY RARE AS I UNDERSTAND THERE ONLY 4 OR 5 OF THESE KNOWN TO BE AROUND.I HAVE IT IN THE NORMAL SEEN STATE.

I AM STILL WORKING ON FINDING MUCH ON THIS COMPANY,ANYONE? EMAIL ME.

A GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK,THANKS DEAN FOR SHARING IT.

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 12~13~09 DRUGGIST FROM WACO,TEXAS.

HERE IS WHAT I FOUND:

DR. HERMAN BEHRENS WAS BORN IN GERMANY IN 1852. MOVING TO MEMPHIS TN. AS A BOY IN 1860'S RANGE. IN 1874 HE MOVED TO PARIS TEXAS AND ENGAGED IN THE DRUGGIST BUSINESS. IN 1878 HE WENT TO WACO TEXAS WHERE HE WOULD REMAIN.

THE FIRST FIRM WAS CALLED BEHRENS & MOSER,THIS WAS SOLD OUT AFTER ONLY A FEW YEARS AND DR. BEHRENS FORMED BEHRENS & CASTLES. IN 1891 IT BECAME KNOWN AS THE BEHREN DRUG CO.

HE WAS REPORTED AS PASSING IN JANUARY 1906 IN WACO TX.

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM TEXAS AND THE BRAD SEIGLER COLLECTION, A RARE AMBER DRUGGIST. WHOLESALE DRUGGIST BEHRENS & CASTLES (CASTLES HAD TIES TOO START OF DR PEPPER) WACO TEXAS. BRAD TELLS ME THERE IS A TRAFFIC CIRCLE IN WACO NAMED AFTER DR BEHREN,HE WAS AN UPSTANDING CITIZEN OF THE TIME FOR SURE.

I KNOW OF ANOTHER ONE OF THESE RARE BIRDS HERE IN N.Y. IN A FREINDS COLLECTION,NICE BOTTLE FROM A DRUGGIST IN BUSINESS UNDER THAT NAME FOR A VERY SHORT TIME ~A GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. THANKS BRAD FOR SHARING IT WITH US.

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 12~6~09, SPARKS PERFECT HEALTH, CAMDEN NEW JERSEY

Perfect Health (for a kidney and liver medicine) was patented January 31, 1888, by the Sparks Medicine Co. of Camden, N.J. It had been produced since 1885

POSTED ALSO IS PICTURE OF BOTH OF DALES "SPARKS" BOTTLES.

"Which of these large Sparks bottles came first? Bill Agee in Collecting The Cures, 1969, states that F.K. & L. Dis. is older than medicine was patented Perfect Health and not Kidney and Liver Cure. Maybe Sparks decided to make his product look more like. Warner's Safe Kidney and Liver Cure to boost lagging sales. However F.K. & L. Cure with the Pure Food and Drugs Act looming up ahead. Somehow, F.K. & L. Ids. reminds me of Warner's Log Cabin bottles a little, and we know they followed Warner's oval bottles by seven years. This question may be difficult to answer"

 

 

 THANKS DALE FOR SHARING YOUR BOTTLE(S) WITH US,GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK!!

 

 

 

 

 

LAST WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM DALE SPARKMANS COLLECTION OUT OF THE GREAT STATE OF TEXAS, A RARE VARIANT OF THE "SPARKS PERFECT HEALTH FOR KIDNEY AND LIVER DISEASES" 9 1/2 INCHES TALL OUT OF CAMDEN,NEW JERSEY.

DALE HAS BOTH OF THE LARGER VARIANTS OF THIS RARE BOTTLE FROM A COMPANY IN BUSINESS FOR ONLY A SHORT TIME.I AM THINKING HE COLLECTES THEM PARTIALLY BECAUSE OF HIS LAST NAME!

"I began the search with the 1870 directory. There was no listing until 1886 which listed a Sparks Medicine Co., 212 Federal St. William H. Sparks was president and James F. Davis was secretary and treasurer. William Sparks lived at 549 Washington St. and James Davis lived at 513 Cherry St."

In 1888, the Company moved to 120-124 Cooper Street and Charles Coulter was the new secretary/treasurer. In 1890, they moved to 105 Market Street. This was the last listing for the Sparks Medicine Co. In none of the directories was there any advertising nor listing in the business directories."

"William Sparks was listed in the next five directories as employed at the Collings Carriage Co. Actually, I should note that a William Sparks was listed. No address was given so I do no know if this is the same as the one above."

We know that Sparks Perfect Health was advertised in 1891 in W.H. Schieffelin & Co.'s publication, and in 1910 in the American Druggist and Pharmaceutical Record. Perhaps some other company had taken over the brand by 1910.

Mr. Sparks may not have stayed in business very long, but he has given us two great old medicine bottles, a smaller cure in both amber and aqua, and a shot glass. All of these are rare except for the smaller cure bottles, and they are not common in my experience: THE MEDICINE CHEST --- BY DR. RICHARD CANNON


 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK OF 11~29~09 DR.CUVERS MALARIAL GERM DESTROYER

IF YOU COLLECT MEDICINES YOU NEED A COPY OF MATTS CD,IT'S GREAT!

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM MATT KNAPP, DR.CULVERS MALARIAL GERM DESTROYER,CLEAVLAND OHIO
SWEET BOTTLE & RARE TOO,THANKS VERY MUCH FOR SHARING MATT.(Guntherhess).

ANYONE GOT ANY INFO ON THIS ONE?? LET MATT KNOW,THANKS

MATTS WEBSITE

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 11~22~09 CHAS.MONELL PAIN DESTROYER

!

I HAVE SEEN A COUPLE OF THESE AND THE MUSHROOM STOPPER IS CORRECT, EXPENSIVE OPTION FOR A NON~REFILLABLE BOTTLE.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM ERICS COLLECTION (COWSEATMAIZE) CHAS. MONELL 10 MINUTE PAIN DESTROYER, 2 & 4 FIRST AVE NEW YORK
THANKS ERIC.

I FOUND THIS:

Blown at the Whitall Tatum Glass Works, Millville, NJ, C. 1885, rare.

Per the NY times dated Dec 29 1903, Charles Monell age 60 fell from his apartment over the drug store he owned and died from a cocusion recieved in the fall. In business since 1862 he had lost most of his sight and had wandered out the open window by mistake it is thought

 



BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 11~8~09, RARE DR. N. WAYT & BROTHERS, STAUNTON VIRGINIA

GREAT BOTTLE DAN,ALTHOUGH HE DID HAVE HELP I SEE!!

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM DAN JOHNSON IN STAUNTON VIRGINIA, COBALT 1880S RANGE DR N. WAYT & BROTHERS DRUGGIST STAUNTON VA.

THANKS DAN,GREAT BOTTLE

THE WAYT FAMILY.
The first of this family who emigrated from England to Va. was George Wayt, who settled in Orange county, circa 1750. He had three sons, namely: i. John; 2 William ; 3. James. John, the eldest son, removed to Augusta about 1790, and m Susan, a d of Joseph Bell, by whom he left no issue. He was a distinguished Mason, merchant, and Mayor of the town. He was an eminently good and pious man, being an Elder in the Staunton Presbyterian Church. William Wayt m Miss Hodges, of Caroline county, and left one son, John Wayt, and three daughters. John Wayt removed to Augusta in 181i. He married twice: first, Margaret A Bell, d of James Bell, by whom he left issue, one daughter, who m Robt J. Porterfield, by whom she left issue, one son. She m secondly Johnston E. Bell, of Lewisburg, and left three children, one son and two daughters. John Wayt m second Sarah A. Bell, d. of Maj. Wm. Bell, of Lewis creek, and left issue at his death in Staunton in 1877, three children: 1. Dr. Newton Wayt; 2. J. Howard Wayt; 3. Mattie, who m Thos. A. Bledsoe, Cashier Nat. V. Bank, Slaunton, and they have issue, two daughters, S. Bell and Mary Lou Bledsoe.
Dr. Newton Wayt m Julia B., a d of Wade H. Heiskell, and has issue, two sons and one daughter, viz: i. Baldwin; 2. Hampton; 3. Mattie. J. Howard Wayt is unmarried.
John Wayt, was long a magistrate of the county, an elder in the churches in Waynesboro and Staunton, and was for years a leading merchant and banker. He had a strong mind, great industry and enterprise. He enjoyed the confidence, respect and esteem of the community, and died beloved and regretted by the entire public.
In 1863 he was an assisant sergon for Dr. Hay at the Staunton General and Recieving Hospital and tended the wounded that were retreating from the battle of Gettysburg.
Born 1837
He died on Sunday, September 18, 1904 Dr. Newton Wayt, in the sixty-eighth year of his age.
He Started his Drug Store in Staunton in 1866

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 11~1~09 RARE POISON ~LEWIS BEAR DRUG CO. PENSACOLA FLORIDA

A RARE POISON BOTTLE FROM THE STEPHEN HAUSEUR COLLECTION. LEWIS BEAR POISON,LEWIS BEAR DRUG CO. PENSACOLA FLA.

GREAT BOTTLE,THANKS STEPHEN,CHECK OUT HIS WEBSITE HERE.

POISONOUS ADDICTION WEBSITE

STEPHEN HAS AN IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION OF POISONS GOING,CHECK IT OUT!!

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 10~25~09, RARE BUTLER IN INK IN APPLE GREEN~1850'S RANGE.

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE IS A RARE APPLE GREEN 1850'S RANGE INK FROM BUTLER INK CO.CINCINATI OHIO.

"Heres the crown of my ink collection 1840, 50s tent or drum shaped Butlers ink from Cinn.O. While these are sum what common in aqua .Colors of green to yellow olive have sold up to 10,000 dollars .Hope ya like it ."
Bill Thomas

I FOUND THIS:

About 1849, they opened, Butler Ink Works, a laboratory for making ink on the north side of 5th St. between Stone and W.W. Canal one block from public landing. As they grew they invested in their own business. They purchased improved machinery for their Blacking factory from which they wholesaled their Oil Paste Blacking in barrels packed with straw containing 6 gross of bottles and shipped them free of expense. Their line of goods expanded to include writing, printing, wrapping, and colored papers, cards, printing ink, paper and leather for bookbinders and paper maker’s materials.

 

 

 

 

THANKS BILL FOR SHARING YOUR GREAT INK!!

BOTTLE OF WEEK FOR 10~18~09, VERY RARE COLOR HANBURYSMITH MINERAL WATER

By Hanbury Smith, M.D.
(The Medical Record, Nov. 1, 1869.)

At a meeting of the New York Academy of Medicine, held Sept. 16th, 1869, Dr. Hanbury Smith read a paper on mineral waters as therapeutic agents. After defining mineral waters as "more or less dilate aqueous solutions, flowing from natural springs, or reached by excavation or boring, and possessed of undeniable medicinal powers," he directed attention to the important part played by the temperature and volume of the solvent water, not forgetting the therapeutic value of the only important gaseous impregnations—carbonic acid and sulphuretted hydrogen. From want of time to treat of them, the so-called alum, bitter, and ferruginous waters were passed over, and might perhaps with propriety be regarded as convenient and varied forms of astringents, laxatives, and tonics, forming a transition series between ordinary medicines and the mineral waters proper. The minerals present in these were next described, and it was shown that all the important ones are exactly those "either forming integral parts of our bodies, or whose presence is absolutely necessary to the accomplishment of the vital processes," certainly a most remarkable coincidence.

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK COMES FROM MARK PETERS COLLECTION, A RARE COLOR HANBURYSMITH MINERAL WATER, IT IS EASY TO SEE WHY THIS IS A HUGE FAVORITE OF MARKS.THANKS MARK FOR SHARING YOUR AWSOME COLORED MINERAL WITH US.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 10~11~09 RARE PONTILED MINERAL WATER ,JOHN SHRINK, OHIO

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS A VERY RARE BOTTLE FROM CLEVELAND OHIO,JOHN SHRINKS SUPERIOR MINERAL WATER. I HAVE NEVER SEEN THE SMOOTH VARIANT OF THIS RARE BOTTLE ONLY THE PANELED VARIANT.

THIS IS FROM THE COLLECTION OF Rich Diogee of Rockaway Beach, OR. "Apparently, John Shrink was found on the vital records as being a resident of Cleveland in 1850, then he seems to disappear until 1870 where he "Pops Up" as a soda bottler... The 1850 record listed him as a grocer."

THANKS RICH,SUPER FIND AND A GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK!

BOTTLE OF THE WEEK FOR 10~4~09, RARE PONTILED INK DATED TO 1840'S

 

THIS WEEKS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK IS FROM JIM MORRISONS COLLECTION. A RARE PONTILED INK HE DUG IN A VERY HARD TO OBTAIN COLOR,WHAT A GREAT INK AND GREAT BOTTLE OF THE WEEK,THANKS JIM.

"Rare emerald green shouldered cone ink bottle, c. 1840s. These were likely blown in New Jersey or Philadelphia. "

BE SURE TO CHECK OUT JIMS WEBSITE FOR SOME MORE GREAT LEWISTOWN PA. STUFF!!

JIM MORRISONS ANTIQUE BOTTLES OF LEWISTOWN