RICKS BOTTLE ROOM.COM

~ ALWAYS IN PURSUIT OF GREAT GLASS ~ © 2007 ~

~ WEBSITE OF THE MONTH

I SEE SO MANY GREAT BOTTLE,ANTIQUE & METAL DETECTING RELATED SITES OUT THERE WHILE DOING RESEARCH OR JUST SURFING, SO I HAVE DECIDED TO ADD A WEBSITE OF THE MONTH PAGE. KIND OF AN EXTENSION OFF MY BOTTLE OF THE WEEK PAGE THAT HAS WORKED OUT GREAT. EACH MONTH I WILL PRESENT ANOTHER GREAT SITE,SO...IF YOU KNOW OF A GREAT BOTTLE COLLECTING OR RELATED COLLECTING TYPE SITE. PLEASE  SEND ME A LINK (ADMIN@RICKSBOTTLEROOM.COM)AND WE WILL SEE HOW THIS WORKS OUT, I AM THINKING THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF THEM OUT THERE.  I KNOW IT IS ALOT OF WORK TO KEEP ONE UPDATED AND INTERESTING AND ALOT OF FUN TO HAVE ONE. I ALSO KNOW IT IS ONE OF THE MOST REWARDING THINGS I DO AND I ENJOY MINE VERY MUCH. THANKS 

  Board of Trustee's member / National Bottle Museum,

member Capitol Region Antique Bottle & Insulator Club

 

ON FACEBOOK?, CLICK HERE AND CHECK OUT & "LIKE" MY FACEBOOK PAGE..RICKSBOTTLEROOM.COM ~ ANTIQUE BOTTLE COLLECTING

ricksbottleroom.com Webutation

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ BOTTLESHOW.COM

 

 
 
 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH, BOTTLESHOW.COM ~ COMPLETLEY REDONE AND AS ALWAYS OFFERING AN AMAZING ASSORTMENT OF HIGH QUALITY GLASS FOR SALE. CLICK ON HEADER AND TAKE A LOOK AT THE NEW BOTTLESHOW.COM

Michael George was born and raised in NH, and currently resides with his family in the countryside of New Boston. He has a bachelor’s degree in Commercial Art from Notre Dame College, and is currently employed as a Marketing Director. His passion for American glass started at an early age, as a collector of medicine bottles that were discovered at local auctions or unearthed in old dumps. Over the years, his expertise and knowledge for bottles expanded into historical flasks and early American glass wares, as he researched the production of 18th and 19th century glasshouses throughout New England.

Michael has become an avid collector and premiere antique glass dealer. He has conducted numerous lectures for historical institutions and produced formal appraisals for collectors or estate settlements, while actively coaching new collectors in the hobby. His glass articles have been published in such magazines and newsprints as Antique Bottle & Glass Collector, Bottles & More, Unravel The Gavel, and Antiques & Arts Weekly. In 2012, Michael served as organizer and curator of the 3-month long New Hampshire Glassmakers Exhibit at the Peterborough Historical Society. He is a member of the Federation of Historic Bottle Collectors, member of the Yankee Bottle Club, and member of the Merrimack Valley Bottle Club. In the Summer of 2013, Michael served as a Chairman and Organizer of the first national Federation of Historic Bottle Collectors (www.fohbc.org) show to take place in New England. The event was hosted at the Radisson Event Center in Manchester NH, consisting of 265 dealers from around the country, and thousands of attendees. He is also very active in the bottle and glass show circuit, participating in over a dozen events annually throughout the East Coast.

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ NEW JERSEY ANTIQUE BOTTLE CLUB
http://www.newjerseyantiquebottleclub.com/images/header2.jpg
 
Munzer Amber Pint Strap Side Whiskey Flask from Paterson, NJCoffin & Hay Amber Eagle/Grapes Quart, Hammonton, NJ
website of the month, NEW JERSEY ANTIQUE BOTTLE CLUB site, anything New Jersey can probably be found here. Click on banner above and have a look around.
 
This is the homepage of the New Jersey Antique Bottle Club. Here you will find club information and the most up to date show contracts for South River, Millville and Hammonton antique bottle shows. We are a non profit antique bottle and glass collector's organization of about 50 members. Our mission is to promote the hobby of antique bottle and glass collecting and the history associated with the manufacture of blowing and pressing glass by traditional methods. South Jersey is noted for its many nineteenth century glass houses and works. America's first successful glass works was founded by Caspar Wistar in 1739 on Alloway's Creek in Salem County. This works operated successfully for a period of 40 years. We interpret American glass as an art form that is produced by skilled craftsmen. Some of these craftsmen still blow glass today and we are committed to preserving this vanishing art form. Our club hosts three shows a year where members can display and trade antique bottles.
 
On right,  Coffin & Hay Amber Eagle/Grapes Quart, Hammonton, NJ (Glass Works)
 
On left   Munzer Amber Pint Strap Side Whiskey Flask from Paterson, NJ (Jim Eifler collection)
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ CLOROX COMPANY BOTTLE ID

The Clorox Company

 MAY SEEM DIFFERENT TO SEE WEBSITE OF THE MONTH BE A MAJOR COMPANY BUT UNLIKE MOST COMPANIES OUT THERE CLOROX OFFERS THIS GREAT HISTORY OF ALL THEIR CONTAINERS, VERY HANDY REFERENCE FOR ANYONE WHO MAY FIND ONE OF THESE AND WANT MORE HISTORY (IE: AGE ETC.)

CLICK ON BANNER ABOVE AND CHECK IT OUT

Bottle collecting has become an increasingly popular hobby among antique lovers in the United States.

1937 quart1939 half gallonBut bottle buff interest isn't confined to historical flasks and ornate decanters; it also includes many types of modern bottles, reproductions, and “collectibles”—bottles not old enough to qualify as antiques—such as the early Clorox liquid bleach bottles.

The trend toward “collectible” bottle gathering is growing. These bottles are more plentiful and considerably less expensive to purchase than their older counterparts, making it possible to possess an interesting bottle collection without substantial investment.

Because people frequently write The Clorox Company asking the vintage of old Clorox liquid bleach bottles they've acquired, this online guide has been prepared to help collectors determine the approximate age of different Clorox bottles used over the years.

In 1913, Clorox liquid bleach was initially offered in five-gallon crockery jugs since it was originally used exclusively by industrial concerns, such as laundries, breweries, walnut bleachers and municipal water companies. This product was delivered by horse and wagon to various customers in San Francisco Bay Area for use as a bleach, stain remover, deodorant and disinfectant. 

  • This guide has been prepared purely as an aid for collectors wishing to determine the vintage of early Clorox bleach bottles.
  • The Clorox Company sets no value on these bottles, nor does it wish to purchase old bleach bottles.
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ GLASS MANUFACTURE'S MARKS ON BOTTLES & OTHER GLASSWARE
 

GLASS MANUFACTURERS’ MARKS ON BOTTLES & OTHER GLASSWARE

 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS ONE I MYSELF HAVE USED AS A REFERENCE MANY TIMES AND A VERY HANDY AND GREAT RESOURRCE, CLICK ON BANNER ABOVE AND LOOK AROUND. BE SURE TO BOOKMARK IT FOR USE IN FUTURE.
 
 Welcome! I’m interested in the history of the glass industry in the US, especially concerning the manufacturing of bottles, electrical insulators and tableware.   On these three pages I’ve attempted to compile a list of glass manufacturers’ identification marks found on (primarily) American bottles and jars. (Click here to check another collector’s site that lists some Australian and English marks). I’m also including  marks seen on glassware items other than bottles, including tableware and industrial glass items such as railroad lantern lenses. Entries on some of the more commonly encountered brand and company names (for instance, Bromo-Seltzer), seen embossed on bottles are also included, as I frequently get questions about them.
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ KREEGER'S ANTIQUE BOTTLE MARKET
 
 
 
SITE OF THE MONTH IS OWNED AND MAINTAINED BY DANIELLE KREEGER, GREAT STE WITH FOR SALE PAGES AND DIG STORIES.CLICK ON BANNER ABOVE AND TAKE A LOOK AROUND,THANKS

This site was created in 1998 and is maintained by Danielle Kreeger for the purpose of selling, trading and buying early American utilitarian glassware.  You'll find a list of items for direct sale, a link to any current auctions I have on Ebay (privygal), and a description of the types of bottles I buy.  I'm always looking for collections to buy in the mid-Atlantic area of PA, NJ, DE and MD.

CASH FOR BOTTLES !

I'm a collector who buys, trades and sells to support my collecting habit. I also enjoy digging whenever my busy schedule permits.  

Construction Crews: Please contact me if you have finds from work sites. I can help appraise your finds. Call or text pictures to me at 610-329-0055. Also, if you have active work sites in the Philly area, let me know if you need expert help finishing pits. I have safely dug 500 privies up to 38 feet deep and have a full setup and equally knowledgeable able-bodied friends to help.

I started collecting antique bottles in 1969. Today, my main interest is pontiled sodas, mineral waters and beers from Philadelphia although there are several other categories that catch my eye too. I am also looking for colored durggist bottles, earlier Delaware County bottles of almost any type, northern Delaware bottles, and Delaware Bay oyster collectibles.

Thanks for visiting my site and please check back for updates. Also, please send any pertinent links you want me to connect to.

 
 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ BOTTLE  PICKERS.COM
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS BOTTLE PICKERS.COM AND IS RUN BY FRANK AND HIS SON, GREAT SITE SO BE SURE TO CLICK ON THE BANNER AND TAKE A TOUR. NO DISAPPOINTMENTS HERE. THANKS
 
 BottlePickers.com is a educational site for the beginner to the long time veteran antique bottle, jar and glass collector. Our pages contain pictures of antique bottle closures, tops and base types. Also, we have included a detailed condition guide, dating guide and rarity guide. Our data base contains hundreds of types and styles of antique bottles and glass related items with more being added monthly.


About Us


I started digging for bottles at the age of ten years old. It was 1970 and my family just moved to a newly built neighborhood a couple of miles from the town of Kendallville, IN. Being the new kid on the block, I met a friend named Dennis E. His parents were antique collectors of a variety of old relics. They told us about the old city dump that was started in the 1890s til its discontinuance in 1950s. Both of us still green behind the ears would strap our shovels and a back pack containing a pair a gloves, a can or two of Mountain Dew and a peanut butter sandwich; hop onto our bikes and ride about three quarters of a mile to the old city dump site. This is where we would spend hours after school and weekends digging holes in the ground looking for glass treasures. Sweat dripping off our foreheads and our arms being so tried from man handling the shovel. Then all at once one of us would yell out "I got one" it's a Dr. Kilmer's wiping off the dirt to get a better look at the bottle. Or when one of us would yell out a couple of curse words because we would see a portion of a bottle and lose our patience and the shovel would strike the bottle and break it. As I think back about that it happened quite a bit. Thus the meaning of being green behind the ears.

The dump was adjacent to a lake. Dennis's father who I called Porky, told us when he was a kid, he would go and gather up bottles that he found on the ground and toss them in the water and try to shoot them with his 22 cal. rifle. The days we would take a break from digging we would launch a little johnboat in the water and look for bottles on the bottom of the lake. You could usually see about four to five feet deep. We would take a long stick and try putting the tip of it inside the neck of the bottle and lifting it out. This was not an easy as it sounds because if you missed you would have to wait for the sediments to settle and find the bottle all over again. There were many of times, we would lose our patience and just jump into the water and try to find it. From 1970 till 1975 we dug or fished out thousands of bottles. Most of them were common with a few scarce to rare pieces.

When my son Frank Jr. turned the age of ten in 1999, he started going with me on old farm dumps and privy digs. Watching the excitement on his face when he would dig up a bottle, that would be the highlight of my day. It did not take long for my son to get off the school bus and hop on his bike to head the a local farm dump with his shovel and a back pack with his gloves, a can of Mountain Dew and a peanut butter sandwich.

In 2011 my son and I created this web site www.bottlepickers.com to share our passion for collecting antique bottles. We hope other folks and their children out there will give it a try so they can see what they have been missing. Also many thanks to my daughter Crystal for all the hours she has invested in helping up build this web site and my wife Cheryl for putting up with my addiction. She sometimes wonders if my son and I need Antique Bottle Rehab.

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ MIKES BOTTLE ROOM
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS ONE I HAVE WATCHED GROW AND IS TURNING OUT TO BE VERY INFORMATIVE ON NEW YORK CITY BOTTLES. MIKE DOES A GOOD JOB WITH HIS DIG VIDEOS AND  ARE WORTH CHECKING OUT. I HAVE ADDED A LINK FOR THEM AND IF YOU CLICK ON THE PICTURE AT LEFT YOU CAN TAKE SOME TIME AND BROWSE HIS SITE. THANKS MICHEAL, NICE JOB.
 
 
 
 
 
For those of you who don't know who I am my name is Mike AKA Chinchillaman1. I'm a Youtube Bottle Digger so to speak which means that I collect bottles and post the videos of various digs or elements of my collection onto You tube. This site is for those who want to get into the hobby of bottle hunting, metal detecting or any treasure hunting hobby in general, or for those who want to find out about the history of bottles that they might already own. Ive been a collector for five years and my goal is to find out about the histories of all of the bottles that I have, local especially. If you'd like to view my bottle digging channel here is the link:
http://www.youtube.com/chinchillaman1


This website will be changing so please visit back often! IF YOU HAVE ANY NY BOTTLES THAT YOU WANT TO SELL, PLEASE SEND ME A MESSAGE!
 
NYDIGGER1@nyc.rr.com
 
 
 
 
 Besides maintaining this site for recording the history of New York City's bottle industry, I am also hoping to reach out to those who own a piece of history themselves. What do I mean? Its simple.

Many of the bottles on this website are dug in areas of New York's forgotten past, mostly from old landfills and dumps. But what landowners and construction workers don't know is that every location that dates back to the 1870s or older may contain a treasure trove of bottles, pottery, and other relics right under their feet. Virtually every backyard and or basement in Manhattan, and most neighborhoods in Brooklyn, Bronx, and Staten Island will have 2 things: A Privy, which was used for sanitation, and A Cistern, which was used for storing rain water. Both of these structures were essential back then because sewage systems and garbage disposal were nearly non existent. Each Cistern AND Privy will contain relics and bottles dating back from the era in which it was built (going as far back as the 1790s) all the way up to the 1870s (when the sewage system was built). For other areas outside of New York City, the story is pretty much the same, except for the fact that the structures could have been used much later into the early 1900s. For Philadelphia, outhouses tend to be much deeper and filled with treasures as well.


Many homeowners and construction workers dont pay any attention to the potential treasure trove that could be excavated through a very simple process. But with the homeowner or builder's permission we could save history. These are the steps which would be taken if we would receive permission for a dig (We have all of the tools and maps necessary for the process):


First, it is necessary to look at the old maps dating back to the 1870s to see if there was a structure located on the property.

Second, we would use a tool known as a "probe", a five foot long steel rod to check the soil in the backyard or basement to locate the Cistern and Privy (which would have been lined with either wood, bricks, or stone). The contents of an old Privy or Cistern would be ash, allowing the probe to gently sink into the ground, as opposed to regular soil. The probe also brings up a sample so that we can be sure exactly where the structures were located.

Third, the excavation would take place. This would span from between 1 and 3 days, depending on the size and depth of the structures.

Fourth, we restore the area of excavation to its prior condition, also sifting the soil for relics such as marbles, pipes, buttons, and coins, before filling the hole back in.

Fifth, we equally share the treasure with the homeowners and every party involved. Sometimes there could be so many artifacts in one structure that every party involved goes home with dozens of bottles. The best part about the whole process is finding out the history of the people who lived in that dwelling. We could tell their living habits, what the drank, if children were present, and if they were sick or healthy, just by the treasures that we find.

We would love to be part in a historical adventure with you!
 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ SODA & BEER BOTTLES OF NORTH AMERICA

WEB SITE OF THE MONTH IS OWNED AND OPERATED BY TOD VON MECHOW AND IS A PRICELESS  REFERENCE GUIDE FOR SODA AND ALE COLLECTORS ALIKE. ONE OF THE THINGS I LOOK FOR IN ANY SITE I RUN FOR SITE OF THE MONTH IS UPDATES AND CONTENT, THIS SITE IS KEPT FRESH AND CONTENT IS GREAT. CLICK ON THE BANNER ABOVE AND PAY A VISIT, YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED. BE SURE TO BOOKMARK IT FOR LATER REFERENCE, THANKS TO TOD FOR HIS EFFORTS, I SEND MANY FROM MY SITE TO HIS FOR ANSWERS.

 

The purpose of this site is to provide useful information for collectors, researchers, and novices on North American hand-made glass and pottery soda and beer bottles.  It's not that we have anything against machine made bottles, it's just that the scope of these bottles is too great to include in this work.

Hand-made glass and pottery beer and soda bottles span over 150 years of use.  In North America, the earliest marked and documented bottles date to the late 1810s and some forms were used until about 1920.  In other parts of the world, marked beer and soda bottles were being used by 1810, and hand-blown bottles were used well into the Twentieth Century.  Unmarked examples were used before marked examples.  Machine-made glass bottles started to replace their hand-blown kin starting about 1905.  Hand thrown bottles continued to be made into the 1920s, even though molding was prevalent.

This site is packed with information and listings of over 27,600 bottles with over 32,100 variants from over 14,400 firms, so step inside.
 
 
Whats new-  The addition of over 1,600 new bottles.  Added over 725 new or improved photos
 

Add 4 new glass manufacturer catalogues.  Including 2 for Cumberland Glass Manufacturing Co. of Bridgeton, NJ, Illinois Glass Co. of Alton, IL and North Baltimore Bottle & Glass Co. of Terre Haute, IN. The links are available under the attributes menu and then under manufacturers with the catalogue link.  The links are also available by manufacturer on the manufactures page by clicking on the catalogue icon (Catalogue).

Updated the Early Soda and Mineral Water article with additional information on Thomas Greenleaf Chase (The Pioneers), and two new bottles and their histories; John Moon of Philadelphia, PA and John Maicks of Reading, PA. Also added links to bottles of related firms mentioned in the articles.

Added 28 new pontiled bottles.  Added two porters from Whitehead, Ihmsam & Phillips of Pittsburgh, PA, a green porter variant marked G. W. Brandt and Dyottville Glass Works from Carlisle, PA, a blue soda from John Kantner of Reading, PA, an amber J. Maick early soda from Reading, PA, fourteen (yes 14) new pontiled bottles from Philadelphia a scar pontiled J. Moon Improved Patent OP type soda, an oval plate marked J. Scherhammer and another marked P. P. Blasse, a green double plated porter marked J. Reynolds, a second double plate porter with only a partial name of F. M. in the plate, a green porter marked F. Bode, another marked R. Humphrey, another marked J. Montgomery, another marked S. McCormick, another marked Planck & Haeffners, a new P. Conway porter marked Union Glass Works and Brown Stout, a porter from the same mold and marked Union Glass Works Brown Stout , but with an empty plate,a new Dyottville porter in green and blue (one in blue is a first for a Dyottville porter and a deviation from the Dyottville green) from Philadelphia, PA,  a green porter marked Jas. Duffin, Port Richmond (section of Philadelphia), PA, a Brown & Reid, from PA (suspects are Philadelphia or Lancaster), a salt jar from Clarke & White of Saratoga, NY, A blue soda from F. Gleason of Rochester, NY without the reversed letters, A Dr. C. L. Whitney's Patent Soda & Mineral Waters from New York, NY, A blue mugbase marked Elmer & Turell of Rossville (Staten Island), NY, a pontiled version of the J. T. Brown Torpedo from Boston, a green pony from Stephan C. Heald of Lynn, MA, a sided aqua soda marked M. Wange from Indianapolis, IN, and a yellow green J. Cairns & Co. variant form Saint Louis, MO.

Added 3 new Gravitating Stopper bottles; one from Bennett & Ketchum of Meadville, PA. and two from L. H. Kerlee of Little Rock, A  Added 2 new Albertson stopper bottles from William S. Kinch of Paterson, NJ.  Added 5 New Codd Patents; one marked La Reina and two variations of The Dominion Soda Water Co. Ltd, both of Montreal, QE, one from Corea & Company and second from R. T. Samuels both of St. Vincent.  Added 5 new Roorbach 1885 patent bottles, one from Emil Marcotte of Taunton, MA, and another from the Westfield Bottling Co. of Westfield, MA, a third fro the Claxton Bottling Works in Claxton, GA, a fourth from the Hammack  Lucas Mfg Co of Atlanta, GA, and a fifth from William Leary of Chester, PA.  Added 1 new Universal Seal Stopper bottle from Charles G. Eckinger of Harrisburg, PA.

Added 7 new glass manufacturer; The Cumberland Glass Manufacturing Co. of Bridgeton, NJ., Gaynor Glass Works of Salem, NJ, Whitehead, Ihmsen & Phillips of Pittsburgh, PA, The Modes Glass Co. of Cicero, IN, Owens Bottle Co. of Toledo, OH, The Chattanooga Bottle & Glass Company of Chattanooga, TN, and Nuttall & Co. Ltd. of St. Helens, England.  Add 2 new potteries; Sipe, Nichols & Co. of Williamsport, PA, and Western Pottery Manufacturing Company of Denver, CO. Added 1 new glass jobber; H. B. Sleeman of London.  Added additional notes to the Frederick Heitz Glass Works.

Add 3 new closure.  A soda bottle closure patented by John Schrink in 1875, a lever stopper made by the Keystone Stopper Company for beer bottles,  and the Kork-N-Seal closure patented in 1906.

Added a new category of Fire Extinguisher.   Added the Virgin Islands (U. K.) as a new country.   Added the Virgin Islands (U. S.) as a new State

 

WEBSITE OF THEE MONTH ~ OUTHOUSE PATROL

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS FROM JAMES CAMPIGLIA & REGGIE SHOEMAN, THEIR SITE HAS SOME GREAT INFORMATION AND ALSO SOME GREAT BOTTLES IN THEIR COLLECTIONS. CLICK ON THE BANNER AT LEFT AND TAKE A LOOK AROUND. THANKS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 OUTHOUSE PATROL

 Please enjoy the photographs of bottles we have dug, bottles in our collections, as well as new finds. We will also show here other friends bottles and just about any picture we feel turned out special that you might want to enjoy. James enjoys photography as well and often takes drives to find an old barn, outhouse, etc. to take pictures of in beautiful Montana where he resides.

About Us

James Campiglia:

Started collecting bottles at age 10 due to the antique glass & bottles he would enjoy in his grandma's house. His brother soon became interested as well and they joined the Las Vegas Antique Bottle Club. James was known for giving his speeches and showing off parts of his collection. (at that time mainly Nevada bottles). Reggie his partner in OuthousePatrol.com would super

vise them when their parents couldn't get away to take them on the club digs.

James moved to Bozeman and sought out the Montana Bottle Collectors Association where he serves as Vice President and Show Chairman. The clubs yearly show, the first week of June is a popular one for Western collectors to gather and he enjoys promoting it.

Actively collecting bottles through shows, digs, yard sales, etc and amassing bottles in many colors and styles with a yearning for Western Blob sodas and rare colored Hostetter's Stomach Bitters (his first bottle given to him by his grandma). Recently getting back into Western Whiskeys and Nevada bottles.

His spouse Tammy enjoys her colored barber bottle collection and receives them for gifts on birthdays and holidays. Recently while in Nevada buying a collection James found some cathedral pickles and pepper sauce bottles which are now in her collection. The bug hasn't bitten her as hard but we are happy displaying our collections in the house and showing them off to friends that come visit.

As a kid it was rocks and lizards and just playing in the dirt. Now its digging deep for artifacts. Collecting casino chips is another passion and James has authored 4 books, "The Official U.S. Casino Chip Price Guide". Many chips were found while traveling the small back roads and towns of Nevada looking for bottles, etc.

It's the hunt that keeps a person going. That elusive bottle buried 100+ years ago in an outhouse or dump. And the stories that can be told of the trials and tribulations of finding and rescuing these artifacts from the hold of the Earth. Traveling to see other collections, showing off his collection, and teaching others as well as photography is part of his varied past time.

 

Reggie Shoeman:

Retired Navy veteran with background in historical research. Searches old town sites with high tech Electromagnetic imaging equipment manufactured by http://www.accuratelocators.com/

This equipment, used in conjunction with aerial photos, old maps, and archival research, often leads us to bottles and other artifacts that were lost or tossed by our ancestors.

Reggie likes to cut deals with folks interested in our passion and a willingness to grant us permission to search for, and recover, artifacts on old their property. Properties such as ghost town, ranches, old mills, etc. in and around Montana, Nevada and other Western States are sought after.

 

We are bottle nuts! James has collected since age 10 and avidly digs and searches for rare bottles for his collections. Always looking to buy more bottles and just talk bottles with fellow collectors or people who have an interest in the history or glass who want to learn, or maybe want to start a collection. We are known to invite others to dig with us and partake in the finds- and the work. Using the track hoe though really cuts down on the manual labor. We get leads from others who just want to help us find where bottles might be and this is always appreciated although the sites are usually more modern- but you never know.

Reggie is a research master. You've got to be good at something in life and he gets us information most can only dream about. Putting that information together to good use is also important. We have a number of computer programs that he is rather savvy at. The above along with the gift to gab and I am often amazed what my digging partner and friend can come up with. I would say more but no need to give away too many of our hard earned secrets!

We both greatly enjoy helping others to become interested in the hobby and some days we do more talking than digging. Kids love dirt and so do we! Show a kid how to find treasure in the ground and a natural instinct kicks in to play in the dirt and to find the unknown. When kids stop by to see what we are doing, they often leave with a bottle or two and an education on how to date the bottles by the mold seems and manufacturing methods.

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ GREAT ANTIQUE BOTTLES
 
 
 
SITE OF THE MONTH IS OWNED BY ED & KATHY GRAY,LONG TIME COLLECTORS/DEALERS IN FINE BOTTLES. THEY ALSO HAVE LISTED THEIR PRIOR SALES FOR REFERENCE, A GREAT RESEARCH TOOL. PLEASE CLICK ON THE PICTURE AND TAKE THE TOUR,GREAT STUFF.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
" We have been collectors and dealers of antique bottles for over 40 years, and live in rural Pennsylvania where there are more deer than people.

We got into antique bottles like most people do--digging in the local ghost towns. Gradually we got interested in and more knowledgeable about bitters, flasks, and other antique bottles, and started going to and setting up at bottle shows. Forty plus years later you will still see us at bottle shows and bottle auctions. We will purchase quality bottles one at a time or an entire collection.

 When you take a look at our bottles and flasks, you will notice that we are very particular in what we buy and sell. Each item is carefully scrutinized and cataloged. Our local post office says we should put on a clinic entitled "how to correctly package bottles for shipment in the mails."

 Prominent bitters and flask collector Sandor Fuss has said “In my own professional opinion, to amass a collection of anything you have to find someone you can trust. They have to be the most knowledgeable and honest people you can find, in my case I was lucky to have found Ed Gray. You simply must find a mentor, it can be through an auction house or it can be a dealer and I went with Gray”.
 All our bottles are guaranteed--you will be happy with them or you can send them back."


 

 

 

 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ HIGH DESERT HISTORIC BOTTLES
 
SITE OF THE MONTH IS FROM BILL LINDSEY, ALSO KNOWN FOR THE AMAZING  Historic Glass Bottle Identification & Information Website  WHICH EXPLAINS THE QUALITY OF CONTENT IN THIS SITE. CLICK ON BANNER  ABOVE AND CHECK IT OUT, THANKS.
 
 Located on Oregon's Williamson River - renown for large redband trout (a rainbow subspecies - illustration 0f a juvenile below). We are near the north end of the Klamath Basin in south central Oregon - a beautiful area with BIG lakes (Klamath & Agency Lakes), near Crater Lake National Park and within sight of two snow covered peaks: Mt. Shasta & Mt. McLoughlin (well, some snow most of the year with McLoughlin). 

The Klamath Basin is on the extreme western edge of the high and "cold desert" of eastern Oregon at over 4100' (valley bottom; mountainous elevations go up from there).  Not real high for the Intermountain West, but just right for cold (but not too cold) winters and warm (but not too warm) summers.  It's flora & fauna reflect its proximity to the Great Basin - the so-called "sagebrush ocean."

I (Bill) am a collector (46+ years!) of all kinds of older, mouth-blown American bottles and flasks produced by hand craftsman methods from the late 18th through the very early 20th century (pre-1910 + or -).  My collecting tastes run the gamut from medicinal tonic bottles (more later), early American figured flasks (aka "historical flasks"), bitters, California Gold Rush era soda & mineral waters and other Western American bottles, early American utilitarian bottles & flasks, Oregon bottles, etc.  I really don't have huge amounts within many of the recognized types or categories of 19th century bottles, but do have something within virtually all types - even some canning jars which are frankly among the most fascinating of the many bottle collecting genres.   My only specialty collecting has been medicinal tonic bottles, which is discussed further down the page. 

 

Medicinal Tonic Bottles

Grouping of 19th and early 20th century medicinal tonic bottles.

My one incursion into bottle collecting specialization is MEDICINAL TONIC bottles.  Not hair tonics, but medicinal tonics where, for example, the word "tonic" is used in the place of the word "bitters" or "cure" - i.e. a Fever & Ague Tonic instead of Fever & Ague Cure.  I do not generally collect items where the word Tonic is descriptive instead of the actual product, i.e. Dr. Jayne's Tonic Vermifuge is not a tonic, but a vermifuge with "tonic effects".  But I would consider the Wilson's Tonic & Sarsaparillian Elixir to be pretty much of a true tonic bottle.  It's a fine line of course, but I'm just after what I consider to be "true" tonic bottles.

I am in the process of compiling a list of all the known, embossed medicinal tonic bottles (though I am also interested in label only ones).  My goal is to get as complete a list as possible, including different embossing patterns of the same brand; color, lip and size variations; and all the unique American and Canadian brands.  I'm currently well over 400 different tonic bottles!    I am striving towards some kind of book (or website?) on the subject in the future.

 

Click on Medicinal Tonics to see my most updated listing of tonic bottles and for more information on the subject.  I am also looking for good quality images of unusual tonic bottles. 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ THE OUTHOUSE.COM

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH  IS COMPLETLY  REDONE AND LOOKING GREAT, PLEASE CHECK IT OUT AND TELL SITE OWNER WAYNE WAGER I SENT YOU. GREAT NEW SITE WAYNE. CLICK ON PICTURE AT RIGHT AND VISIT NOW


 

HI, FELLOW COLLECTORS AND THE CURIOUS!  THIS WEBSITE IS RENTED, AND UPDATED, BY WAYNE J. WAGAR, OF NANAIMO, VANCOUVER ISLAND, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA. I AM A VERY PASSIONATE ANTIQUE BOTTLE COLLECTOR. I COLLECT MOSTLY B.C. BOTTLES, HOWEVER, I ALSO COLLECT SQUAT SODAS (FROM ANYWHERE, MOSTLY FROM THE U.S.A.) AND MOST OTHER ASSORTED BOTTLES. I PREFER DIGGING MY BOTTLES, HERE ON VANCOUVER ISLAND, HOWEVER, I ACQUIRE MANY OUT OF B.C. PROVINCE BOTTLES. HERE ARE SOME OF MY COLLECTION. MORE COMING ALL THE TIME. STAY TUNED.

I SEE I HAVE A COUPLE OF DUPLICATE PAGES, FOR SOME BOTTLES, LIKE BRITISH INKS, ON DIFFERENT PAGES. PLEASE EXCUSE ANY MISTAKES I HAVE MADE. I HAVE SO MANY PAGES NOW, IT GETS A LITTLE CONFUSING SOMETIMES! 

I HAVE ADDED MANY MORE PAGES OF WORLDWIDE BOTTLES. PLEASE TAKE THE TIME TO CRUISE THROUGH ALL PAGES THAT INTEREST YOU. THERE ARE HUNDREDS OF BOTTLES LISTED NOW. THIS IS VERY LIKELY ONE OF THE LARGEST BOTTLE WEBSITES ON THE INTERNET! AND, IT'S STILL GROWING. I HAVE A VERY LARGE VARIETY OF BOTTLES. ENJOY!!

PLEASE DO CHECK OUT MY "FOR SALE" PAGE. MANY GOOD BOTTLES FOR SALE! ALSO, NEW PAGE "BOTTLES WANTED". MAYBE YOU HAVE WHAT I'M LOOKING FOR? 

QUESTIONS? COMMENTS? REQUESTS? BOTTLES FOR SALE? CASH DONATIONS TO HELP KEEP THIS WEBSITE FUNCTIONING? IT'S FREE FOR YOU TO USE, HOWEVER, IT DOES COST ME, MONTHLY.  wayne@theouthouse.ca. DONATIONS, WITH MY THANKS, PAYABLE TO PAYPAL TO w_wagar@yahoo.ca

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ EARLY AMERICAN STONEWARE

Early American Stoneware 

 

SITE OF THE MONTH IS RUN BY  WARREN F. HARTMANN, GREAT SITE WITH SOME AMAZING STONEWARE,CLICK ON BANNER ABOVE

Welcome to my site. 

This site will predominantly feature American Stoneware from the late 18th century to mid 19th century, primarily offering pieces from New York, New Jersey and New England. Specializing  in New York State Capital District pieces. 

The site will offer an array of different sizes and forms of pots, jugs and jars, and will occasionally include other smaller items such as inkwells and flasks. The selection will be updated as often as possible, in an effort to keep the current selection as diversified and interesting as possible.  Please always check the site last updated field.  If you don't see something you might be looking for in early pieces only.   Email me I might be able to help you locate it for you.

The majority of stoneware was produced as a utilitarian ware to be used in the home  and everyday life.  As such, early pieces might show some wear or have minor damage due to everyday use.  Due to firing techniques and kiln conditions, early pieces may have kiln imperfections and touch marks also. I also believe that restoration is acceptable to preserve some of these wonderful pieces so that people can enjoy them for years and pass them on to future generations.   

All pieces offered will be described accurately and in detail, pointing out and thoroughly describing all damage or imperfections as they exist.  In addition, any restoration will be described in detail. All my restorations are done by a highly professional restorer. Items will be fully guaranteed as described with a professional return policy applying to all purchased items. Meaning that when you receive the piece and its not for you, just contact me via phone let me know your returning it.  All I ask is that it is returned in the same condition as it was shipped.    

Stoneware Collecting:   In this section I try and give the beginner and the advanced collector perspective and insight into collecting. 

Stoneware Books:   Listed are books that I recommend  for everyone interested in early Stoneware. Some books are out-of-print, and some are more recent publications. When  I do have copies of these publications. I will offer them for sale in this section.

Archives:  These are photos of pieces with a brief description that were available on the site. If you would like more detail description of the piece just email me.

****                                                                                                                                                                

Warren F. Hartmann has been actively involved with the researching, collecting and selling of American stoneware for more than 30 years, concentrating on early American stoneware dating from the late 18th century to 1840. 

Since 1971, he has studied thousands of pieces of stoneware from personal collections, museum collections and sales in the North East.  He has spent time with many early collectors, gaining from their knowledge and experience, and has helped both collectors and museums develop and expand their collections.  Warren is well-read, using books by Donald B. Webster, Harold F. Guilland, William C. Ketchum, Georgeanna H. Greer, M. Lelyn Branin and others as a basis for his work. 

Warren is honored to have had his knowledge of early Albany stoneware acknowledged in Warren F. Broderick and William Bouck’s 1995 publication of “Pottery Works”, a study of the “Potteries of New York State’s Capital District and Upper Hudson Region”. 

Because of his in-depth knowledge of stoneware form, decoration and clay and how they differ based on time period and locale, he is often consulted on the attribution, dating and pricing of early American stoneware by collectors, auction houses and dealers alike. 

After having worked for IBM for 24 years, Warren worked for the Harmer Rooke Galleries in New York (1995-1997) as the Director of the American Stoneware Department, organizing and managing stoneware auctions.

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ N.Y. ARTIFACT ART
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH COMES FROM A FELLOW NEW YORKER AND IS PACKED WITH SOME GREAT READING AND PICTURES, CLICK ON THE BANNER ABOVE AND GO TAKE A TOUR OF THIS WELL DONE SITE.
 
 
Inevitably, when I am out scouting locations to dig for New York's past, landowners and builders do not realize that the buildings they live in or sites they are working on are old enough to have fairly large deposits of bottles, pottery and other relics from the 1870s and on back in time. Many parts of Manhattan including virtually every block south of 34th Street from the East River to the Hudson will have these precious objects of New York's past.

This is likewise true for many square blocks of Brooklyn spanning Greenpoint and Williamsburg to the Heights and Red Hook, and even for all of the old towns of Queens, the Bronx, and Staten Island. Anywhere there was a house or a business that predates the Civil War even if the original structure was destroyed a century ago there will be a repository of discarded or lost bottles, ceramics, and other past objects much like on every page of this website.

The reason is that regular municipal water delivery, sanitation pick-up, and sewer hook-ups did not happen in New York City until the 1850s at the earliest and, usually, into the 1870s. Therefore, every backyard yes, every yard in the city typically had both a brick-lined cistern for storing rain water and a stoned-lined privy for "necessary" use and depositing household waste. Over time, as plumbing became required and the cisterns and privies were no longer needed, the original "deposits" were left, some additional basement trash added, and then they were capped with fill dirt to level out the yards. These time capsules usually no newer than the 1870s are waiting for us today. Inevitably these historic treasures are destroyed during construction projects and renovations, that is, unless aware owners and builders get in touch with us or we stumble upon a likely site in our travels and we show the property owner what lies in their yard.

And this is how so many landowners invite us to search their construction sites, vacant lots, or house renovations to locate these cisterns and outhouse wells located in the back yard before these traces of the past are lost.

Once a landowner or builder wants us on the site to retrieve the irreplaceable before it is destroyed, we first review historic maps of New York to the early 1800s through to the modern day to understand the development of a property over time. Then, we visit the property and using a simple spring steel rod, called a probe, we gently slide it into the ground to feel for the cistern or privy walls (brick or stone) and disturbances in the soil. In this way, we can pinpoint the location to your privy or cistern before excavation begins.

Thereafter, the dig for these historic past objects usually takes from one to four days to complete as we examine the identified privies and cisterns taking great care to maintain a neat site. All objects of history and interest are extracted. To make sure we are not missing anything, the entire trash layer of the privy is also sifted for small objects such as marbles, coins, clay pipes, buttons, and even pieces of broken pottery.

After the dig is completed, and the site restored to the condition as found if not better, we freely share many of the bottle finds with the owner or builder in fact, some property owners have received so many bottles they have incorporated them into entire display cabinets showing the history of their site. All other artifacts, primarily pottery, are washed and restored or used for artifact art (collages, shadow boxes, and jewelry) such as on this website. Any pottery that can be readily fixed, because there are enough shards to glue together most of a vessel, will be glued, the holes filled with plaster or epoxy, the historic patterns painted, and the in-fill glazed. This is an intense and time consuming process. Pottery that cannot be mended will be used in collages, shadow boxes, or made into jewelry.

Restored pottery or artifact art from a dig location is always brought back to the property owner for their first right of refusal, if they desire and without any obligation, to purchase any pieces. Landowners often request special collages or jewelry be made from particular relics uncovered from their property. We must admit that as history is our passion and artifact art our livelihood, we wish that we could give everything away but we cannot; however, on this journey together we can share in New York’s past and bring it to life again.
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ OLD WEST BOTTLES

 WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS OLD WEST BOTTLES.COM, I HAVE ALWAYS HAD A SOFT SPOT FOR WHISKEY CYLINDERS AND FLASKS AND THE ONES FROM OUT WEST ARE EASY TO APPRECIATE. CLICK ON THE BANNER ABOVE AND TAKE A LOOK AROUND THIS GREAT SITE.

 

 

 

Welcome to our website

The "Trading Post" is back!

We're offering some choice bottles in all categories from an old collection.

Thanks for checking out "Old West Bottles" website. Our site is dedicated to 19th century Western bottles and the sharing of our hobby & information. Take a step back in time to early California and explore the past with articles, pictures, digging stories and the history behind Western bottles.

With an avid interest in California history in addition to collecting Western bottles, I've seeked them throughout much of the West since the 1960s. Their history including; how & where they were made, products they contained, who used them and where they ended up will all be explored within our site. Many that were blown here on the West Coast in the 19th century and are some of the most beautiful unique glass bottles ever produced.

 Our goal is to make this site fun and informative. It is unique in the way that it focuses mainly on Western bottles of all kinds which is unlike any other site on the internet. We welcome any comments or suggestions you may have. We will continue adding interesting new material in addition to keeping it updated on a regular basis.

 

 

 

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ MRBOTTLES.COM
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS A MUST IF YOU COLLECT OR HAVE INTEREST IN ANY WISCONSIN BOTTLES THAT IS FOR SURE, CLICK ON THE PICTURE ABOVE AND SPEND SOME TIME EXPLORING THIS WELL DONE ALWAYS CHANGING WEBSITE WITH GREAT ARTICLES,SERVICES AND PICTURES OF SOME GREAT FINDS. NO DISAPPOINTMENTS HERE, THEY HAVE A GREAT REPUTATION FOR ALL PROVIDED SERVICES AND COME HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.
 
 
 This website is to unite Wisconsin antique bottle collectors from every corner of the Web. Your input is critical... Please write out the story of your greatest Wisconsin bottle success or send a few photos of your favorite bottle with a description. Mrbottles is constantly changing. It will be THE greatest resource for Wisconsin antique bottle collectors EVER!!!

Every aspect of the mrbottles antique bottle web site is a service to every antique bottle collector, especially Wisconsin antique bottle collectors.  For a beginner antique Wisconsin bottle collector this website is intended to end the aimless search for information about antique bottle collecting and Wisconsin bottles.  A newbie can easily access a lot of fundamental antique bottle collecting information by simply typing in the name on the bottles they find on Google.  For more experienced collectors mrbottles.com has the most detailed and sophisticated bottle galleries available anywhere on the internet with new antique bottles being added to the galleries daily.  Mrbottles.com also has a ton of information about antique bottles including interesting antique bottle collecting news articles, stories of collectors out hunting for antique bottles and even a Wisconsin antique bottle forum where you can get to know and communicate with other antique bottle collectors.  This antique bottle collecting website started with one goal in mind; a place where people can go to find the information they crave about the hobby they love...  Collecting antique Wisconsin bottles and stoneware.

Services provided are headed up by Steve Hochhalter's (Known as The Glass Artisan) antique bottle and antique glass cleaning services.  From that tough stain inside a seltzer bottle, to a super sick glass or oxidized antique beer bottle to antique Vaseline glass in need of a gentle polish to fine glassware and crystal The Glass Artisan can and will clean your antique glass and will clean your antique bottles restoring their original luster and beauty without taking anything away from the character or integrity of the antique glass in need of cleaning.  Contact the Glass Artisan now to have him polish your antique bottles or clean your antique glass.  glassartisan@mrbottles.com

Another big service provided by mrbottles.com is free antique bottle appraisals.  Mrbottles.com administrators are expert in every category of antique bottle and antique stoneware from Wisconsin.  With a huge knowledge base in Wisconsin antique bottles and the ephemera that goes with them mrbottles administrators stay on top of sales occurring on line, at auctions and privately.  A little bit of information and ideally a picture or two sent to steve@mrbottles.com will get the ball rolling in you receiving an accurate sale price range of value.  In the end any antique bottle appraisal can only be so accurate.  An antique bottle is worth exactly what someone is willing to pay for it.  That said, mrbottles.com administrators antique bottle appraisals and antique stoneware appraisals are usually very close or exactly what we see the same bottles sell for at auction.  

Selling antique bottles can be a confusing for people who found or inherited a large number of bottles.  Our antique bottle appraisals can help.  If you are interested in selling one or a number of Wisconsin antique bottles we are happy to make an offer or try to connect you to honest Wisconsin antique bottle collectors who will pay the most for the specific antique bottles or stoneware you have for sale.  The bragging stories of collectors who took advantage of unknowing owners of Wisconsin bottles are the worst aspect of collecting antique bottles and stoneware.  The mrbottles.com team will do everything we can to keep you from being one of those stories.

 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ THE NATIONAL BOTTLE MUSEUM
 
 
  WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS FOR THE NATIONAL BOTTLE MUSEUM LOCATED IN BALLSTON SPA NEW YORK, MANY NEW AND GREAT THINGS GOING ON AT THE MUSEUM WITH THE OPENING OF THE JAN RUTLAND ARTIST ROOM UPSTAIRS AND THE GREAT NEW WEBSITE, CLICK ON THE PICTURE ABOVE TO GO THERE NOW. PLEASE STOP BY IF IN THE AREA OR...PLAN A DAY TRIP AND DONATE TO THIS GREAT ORGANIZATION AS THEY ARE A NON PROFIT AND VERY IMPORTANT LINK TO AMERICAS FIRST MAJOR INDUSTRIES PAST. THANKS
 
 
 
 
THE NATIONAL BOTTLE MUSEUM

Situated in the heart of Ballston Spa, NY is a museum whose mission is to preserve the history of our nation’s first major industry: Bottle making. Exhibits inside of the National Bottle Museum allow visitors to view thousands of glass bottles that were produced by strong men who toiled in intense heat for 12 hours a day, six days a week when the demand for glass containers was staggering. It was an era when vast commercial empires rose and fell. In many cases, only the bottles remain as witness to the drama.

Millions of glass bottles per year were manufactured by hand for the mineral waters of Saratoga County alone, enabling the area to participate in world commerce during the early 1800s. A glassworks set in the wilderness above the Town of Greenfield employed hundreds of workers and glassblowers from the 1840s to the 1860s. In that era, all bottles were manufactured exclusively with hand tools and lung power.

One entire wall of the museum’s first floor showcases approximately 2,000 bottles of many colors, shapes and forms. All of these bottles are accessioned into the collection to be held in trust for the public. When creating interpretive exhibits, borrowed bottles and related objects are often combined with those from the collection. In some cases, all exhibit objects may be borrowed. The museum has access to collections all over the United States, and borrowing objects from members makes frequent changes and more spectacular exhibits possible.

The historic three-story brick commercial building on Milton Avenue (Route 50) that houses the National Bottle Museum is situated in what was a flourishing resort community in the 1800s that boasted many popular mineral water springs. Indeed, Ballston Spa was a popular “watering hole” for the rich and famous during the heyday of the mineral water industry.

No longer advertised or widely marketed as cures, only two mineral water springs continue to flow in the village. Both are within a short walking distance from the museum. The Old Iron Spring on Front Street flows year round while The Sans Souci flows freely during the summer months. (The museum is directly across the street from where the world famous Sans Souci Hotel once stood.)

The world-wide mineral water industry was just one of many industries creating a tremendous demand for glass bottles. America was the world’s largest producer of fine essence oils. The west was being settled, creating a demand for millions of whiskey flasks and spirits bottles to help men cope with loneliness and hardship. Every pharmacy, every producer of patent medicines, every brewery, dairy farm and manufacturer, required hand-made glass bottles. Machine made bottles were not manufactured until after Michael Owens patented his inventions in 1903.

The latest museum program is the development of a Museum Glassworks. A separate building on nearby Washington Street is equipped with torches and hand tools for teaching lampworking, a process of working with glass rods and tubing to create smaller objects from hot glass. A full-size glass furnace has recently been installed so that students and visitors will soon be able to experience for themselves techniques employed by glassblowers of the past, and still employed by the glass artist of today.

Current members of the museum reside in all but two of the United States, and several Provinces of Canada. A few members reside in Europe. More than 30 bottle-collecting clubs from across the nation help to support the museum as well. Individual clubs can have as many as 2,000 or as few as 10 members. Almost every club holds an annual Bottle Show and Sale.

The National Bottle Museum sponsors its own Bottle Show and Sale, which draws dealers and collectors from across the United States, Canada, and sometimes Great Britain. The Saratoga Show, as it is known, serves as the Museum’s main annual fundraiser.

The National Bottle Museum is a not-for-profit (501 C-3) educational institution
chartered by the Board of Regents of the New York State Education Department..

 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ 1780 FARMHOUSE.COM
 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS AN EXCITING  RECENT  ONE PUT TOGETHER BY LONG TIME COLLECTOR/DEALER ERIC M. RICHTER FROM PENNSYLVANIA.  CLICK ON THE BANNER ABOVE AND TAKE A STROLL BACK IN TIME LOOKING THROUGH SOME GREAT  ANTIQUE GLASS AND READING UP ON WHAT IS  NEW IN OLD AT 1780 FARMHOUSE.COM, YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED.
 
 
 

About 1780 Farmhouse.com

Welcome to my website which is new, created 10/06/2012, and will always be a work in progress. I envision it akin to a magazine with no end.  Stay tuned for some very exciting happenings; a multi privy dig out behind the Farmhouse, a dig of the old dump behind the barn, other privy digs, and lots of historic information and photos of some fantastic historic glass and just about everything else. The diggin’s out back of the Farmhouse will depend on weather and available help, but the outcome will be well worth any wait.

The whole idea of this website was originally to document the outhouse privy excavations  behind the 1780 farmhouse I live in, which it will, but it’s turned out to be a lot more than  that. This site features articles and stories for both the historic glass and bottle collector, fossil and artifact enthusiast, and the history buff. Not to mention what collecting is all about; stories of pickin’s and finding great pieces of history at incredible deals. The Good Will Hunting Page really does apply to the whole site.

Updates

My category pages are continuing to be updated. There’s no shortage of items and collectibles to be added, stories and articles to be written; there’s only the matter of time it takes to get everything on board. The pickin’s are still happening, so it’s never going to have an end. This site will always be in a state of continuous growth. It’s a one man operation, from every word to photo, and I’m a full time working guy so time is the biggest factor.

I strive to be as accurate as possible in my writings and research. If I have written anything you may have more information on; I welcome your contacting me with any additional information. I make no claims to be an expert on anything. I just have a passion for history and the many beautiful items that have passed through it and into my hands. This is a site about sharing history and the fascinating and exciting stories of their acquisition from the perspective of a wide ranging and curious, old fashioned ‘Picker’ collector.

 

About Me

I’ve always had a passion for exploring and a love of history and have always collected something. It all started in 1975, when I was 10 years old and saw the movie Jaws. Not long after, I saw my first ‘Monster’ Megalodon fossil shark tooth. The result of that was 15 plus years spent diving the Gulf of Mexico and Florida rivers for fossils, shark teeth, large woolly mammoth teeth and bones, Indian artifacts and becoming both a fossil and antique dealer.

 

 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ EARLY VERMONT MEDICINES
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH COMES FROM THE GREEN MOUNTAIN STATE AND IS OWNED & MAINTAINED BY RICK & CATHI LEVEY. CLICK ON PICTURE AT LEFT AND TAKE A LOOK AROUND, ALWAYS UPDATED AND ALWAYS SOME OF VERMONT'S BEST IN GREAT BOTTLES.
 
 
Welcome. This website is dedicated as a resource and forum for collectors of Vermont antique medicine bottles and of course all antique bottle collectors. The site will be actively compiling (with your help) a check list of early Vermont Medicines. This site will also provide a venue to buy, sell and trade early Vermont Medicines and other antique bottles as well.

Whether you are in search of a specific Vermont Medicine or looking to sell one bottle or a collection, we can help you. We Buy Bottles, we will purchase single items or an entire collection. We can also sell your bottles for you in our consignment "sale" section.

The “For Sale” section now contains antique Vermont Medicines for sale as well New York Medicines and other antique bottles for sale. If you are interested in one or many, contact us. In some cases, we have room to negotiate on our prices. Please feel free to make an offer or ask for our best price. Layaway is also available.


Take a look at the VT Medicine Checklist, maybe you have an early Vermont Medicine that is not currently listed on the site – send us your info and photo (if possible) to info@VTMedicines.


Be sure to check back regularly and see what is new, happy collecting.

Rick and Cathi Levey
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~  JEFF & HOLLY NOORDSY
 
SITE OF THE MONTH IS OWNED AND MAINTAINED BY JEFF & HOLLY NOORDSY, LONG TIME, RESPECTED DEALERS IN EARLY AMERICAN BOTTLES & GLASS. CLICK ON THE GREAT WINDOW PICTURE BELOW AND STEP BACK IN TIME AND EXPLORE SOME OF THE BEST IN PERIOD GLASS AND ANTIQUES, WITH A PRICELESS REFERENCE OF PAST  SALES PERTAINING TO BOTTLES AND GLASSWARE.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Jeff and Holly Noordsy
 
 
 Dealers Specializing in the Sale of Early American Antique Bottles, Antique Glass and Period Decorative Arts
 
 
 
For those who prefer private dealings to internet auctions, we have created an online antique bottle and antique glass store that showcases a portion of our current inventory. The page is updated often and we encourage you to check back regularly to see what's new! All objects are priced competitively and listed by category - please follow the links below to peruse our current stock of antique bottles and antique glass. Items that are currently available for purchase are listed as "available," while objects that have already been spoken for are either marked as "sold" or "on hold." If an item that interests you is listed as being "on hold," please eMail us so that we may contact you if the transaction is not completed. In SOME cases we have the room to negotiate on the listed price for a given antique bottle or antique glass object - please feel free to ask for our best price or make an offer and we will get back in touch with you ASAP. We do have a thirty day layaway plan - we ask for a small, non-refundable deposit (25% of the agreed upon price) to set the item aside and require that the balance be paid within thirty days. Other arrangements are happily considered on a case by case basis. All antique bottles and antique glass items are guaranteed as represented and we offer a full refund policy. If you are not satisfied with your purchase, we simply ask that you please contact us within three days of the item's receipt.
 
 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ TAVERN TROVE

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS ONE I USE OFTEN FOR INFORMATION ON BREWERS AND TO BROWSE THROUGH THE  ENDLESS LISTINGS OF ITEMS FOR SALE RELATED TO EVERYTHING BREWING. THE SITE IS ALWAYS BEING UPDATED AND EASY TO NAVIGATE, CLICK ON THE BANNER ABOVE AND SPEND SOME TIME EXPLORING....YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED

 

I've heard some friends lately complaining about the new eBay policies.  It seems that their decision to force its users to exclusively use Paypal has sent both buyers and sellers into boycott mode.  I want you to know, dear collector, that there is an alternative for your breweriana trading needs.
Anyone can sell on Tavern Trove and the cost is small compared to eBay.  $500 per year, cash or trade, for unlimited listings.  There are no listing fees, no consignment or "Final Value Fees", no charges for extra photographs. These are all
free with your subscription.  For your customers, there are no "Buyers Premiums" or subscription charges of any kind.  Very simple.
On Tavern Trove you are free to conduct your business as you wish. Transactions are neither conducted nor monitored by Tavern Trove.  Think of your listings as classified ads. You can accept any form of payment you like.  You set the shipping price.  You can even offer items for trade.  We don't get involved.  You keep control of your collection at your house, communicate with customers directly, and pack and ship orders to your standards and schedule.
On Tavern Trove, your breweriana will be featured on a website specifically devoted to the love of breweriana and brewery history, in fact Tavern Trove is the largest website of its kind.  We have over 32,000 items for sale and 11,363 brewery histories from around the world.  In other words Tavern Trove is the proper, respectful place to host your collection.
Over the years many people have sold their collections through Tavern Trove. it can take a while, you may have to wait for the right person at the right time.  If your item is priced right it will sell quickly.  But Tavern Trove is not designed for instant gratification.  We take the long view.  Tavern Trove listings are not auctions.  You choose a price, post your items and let it ride.
Like anywhere else, the unusual and rare sells best on Tavern Trove.  Unless you offer screaming deals you may be disappointed selling $10 items.  The average listing period for a $10 item on Tavern Trove is 282 days.  In contrast, I have had dozens of scarce pieces sell within 5 minutes of going live.
Tavern Trove is viewed by thousands of people every day, and our visitors come specifically to learn about or purchase breweriana.  Serious collectors check Tavern Trove's latest additions every week.  Hundreds of them have filled out keyword wantlists and are notified instantly whenever an item they collect is listed.  I also send out periodic emails announcing new collections or sellers.  These emails go out to over fifteen thousand collectors worldwide.
So sign up by following this link then go to "List A New Item" and check out the format.  Posting an item should take less than two minutes once you have your photos.  It is very simple.  Then, if you like what you see you can go ahead and purchase a subscription using the "Purchase Subscription" link.  If you want to trade toward the subscription price email me and let me know what you have.  Feel free to call if you have any questions.
Good luck in collecting,

 

Mailing
Address: Tavern Trove
P.O. Box 80191
Raleigh, NC 27623-80191

Phone: (919) 251-8961     Email: TAVERN TROVE

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ TREASURE WORKS

            WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS THE TREASURE WORKS SITE OPERATED BY TOMMY VAWTER , I HAVE BEEN A MEMBER OF THIS SITE FOR A WHILE AND IT ALWAYS HAS GREAT ARTICLES AND NEWS FOR A LOT OF AREAS OF COLLECTING INCLUDING BOTTLES. SEE THE ARTICLE I POSTED BELOW FROM THEIR SITE CONCERNING ALL OF US "TREASURE HUNTERS" AND WHAT PULLING TOGETHER CAN ACCOMPLISH, LIKE IT SAYS AT THE BOTTOM OF THE ARTICLE....JOB WELL DONE !.STOP BY AND BROWSE A WHILE, YOU WILL NOT BE DISAPPOINTED.

 

CLICK ON THE PICTURE AT LEFT AND YOU'RE THERE, THANKS

 

 

 


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By Tommy Vawter, TreasureWorks.com

FLORIDA – It was learned late today that Senator Hays today pulled the HB 868, and that the Bill titled Archeological Sites and Specimens is now dead in the Florida legislature. Treasure Hunting legend Pat Clyne said in a statement on facebook today that Senator Hays had a conference call this afternoon with the Historic Shipwreck Salvage Policy Council, and that “The Senator acknowledged the mass mailings, and said he was grateful that he heard from so many of us and that he would drop not only the bill but he would like to come down to Key West for a meeting with our group so that the next time we will be included in any legislation that concerns our interest”. Pat also invited the Senator to come dive with him on the Atocha shipwreck in Key West.

The Historic Shipwreck Policy Council is a part of Professional Marine Explorers Society, and is set up specifically to deal with political issues such as this one that affect Professional Shipwreck Salvage. Other members of the council involved in today’s conference call with Senator Hays were Taffi Fisher Abt, of the Mel Fisher Maritime Heritage Society, Archaeologist Jim Sinclair, Capt Gary Randolf and John Browning

It was just six days ago that many Treasure Hunters and Metal Detectorist across the sunshine state had first learned of legislation moving its way through the Florida State legislature that would effectively ban treasure hunting and metal detecting in the state.

At the time it seemed like a lost cause to try to mount a counter offensive. In November of 2011, Senate Bill 868, and House Bill 591 were both filed in the State legislature, and on February 16th, of this year the House bill, titled Archeological Sites and Specimens, passed the house with a vote of 118 to 0. Meanwhile over in the Senate, the Bill was going before its last committee for a vote on the very day that most in the treasure hunting and metal detecting were hearing about the legislation for the first time.

Word quickly spread throughout the community via websites like TreasureWorks.com, and all over Social Media websites like facebook. The loosely knit group of Professional Treasure Hunters and Metal Detecting Enthusiast came together and joined forces to fight the legislation.

Information such as phone numbers, email addresses, web page links of key players from Florida Governor Scott, too members of the State House and Senate quickly spread like wild fire across the internet. A letter writing campaign was quickly launched via email and posting on websites. While posting to the Florida Governors facebook page were taken down as fast as people posted them. However, people persisted and continued to post to his page. Of course as soon as the public heard that the posts were being taken down, even more people attacked the page in opposition to the Bills.

The next attack by the Treasure Hunters and Metal Detectorist came in the form of letters to the editors of everyone’s local news outlets expressing opposition to the Bills, and spreading awareness to the general population that these Bills were also an assault on personal property rights of everyone in Florida.

I would like to personally thank Pat Clyne and all the members of the Historic Shipwreck Policy Council for the hard work they put into successfully defeating this legislation. Equally important to the defeat of this Bill, I would like to thank each of the individuals who took the time and interest to stand up for your rights as responsible Treasure Hunters and Metal detectorist, and now political activist.

Job well done !

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~  ANTIQUE MEDICINES.COM
MATT'S COLLECTIBLES/ ANTIQUE MEDICINES.COM
 
 
 WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS OWNED AND MAINTAINED BY MATT KNAPP AND IS THE "GO TO" SITE FOR MEDICINE BOTTLE COLLECTORS. CLICKING ON EITHER PICTURE WILL TAKE YOU THERE, MATT HAS AMASSED AN IMPRESSIVE LISTING OF MEDICINES
 
 
ANTIQUE MEDICINE NEXUS
THE FREE ONLINE GUIDE TO AMERICAN ANTIQUE
MEDICINE BOTTLES

AND I MYSELF USE HIS SITE OFTEN FOR REFERENCE.
HERE IS MATT'S CONTACT MATTS COLLECTABLES
BE SURE TO SPEND SOME TIME AND LOOK THROUGH THE MEDICINE TOPICS OF INTEREST SECTION, I KNOW THE TIME SPENT DOING THIS KIND OF RESEARCH AND ENJOY DOING IT MYSELF.

 
 
 

 
HE HAS SECTIONS FOR CIVAL WAR RELICS, BOTTLE ID,A GREAT CD LISTING OF AMERICAN MEDICINES THAT IS UPDATED EACH YEAR AND MUCH MORE, TAKE A TOUR AND THANKS MATT, GREAT SITE!!
 
 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ ANTIQUE BOTTLE DEPOT


WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS THE "ANTIQUE BOTTLE DEPOT" FROM MINNESOTA, CHECK OUT THEIR SITE { CLICK ON BANNER ABOVE } AND FOR SALE PAGE, I HAVE ADDED THE LINKS BELOW TO THEIR EBAY SALES AS WELL AS CONTACT.

 

 

Welcome to the Antique Bottle Depot

 

 We are active buyers of early American bottles, advertising, Red Wing stoneware, breweriana, country store and drug store memorabilia.

 

 The following items are currently for sale from the Antique Bottle Depot. All items have a 7 day return option. Postage and insurance are extra. Payment through Pay Pal accepted at: steve@antiquebottledepot.com or we will accept a postal money order. Please make payment within 7 days. Please check back often for new merchandise. Additional offerings may be seen on e-Bay at ketchthepast.

 

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ BOTTLESHOW.COM
 
 
 
 
 
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH BELONGS TO MICHAEL GEORGE AND CONTAINS HIGH QUALITY BOTTLES AND GLASS FROM MICHAEL AND OTHER REGISTERED DEALERS. LOOKING FOR OR WANT TO SELL QUALITY 1800'S BOTTLES? THEN YOU HAVE COME TO THE RIGHT SITE. CLICK ON THE BANNER ABOVE AND TAKE A TOUR...YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED. 
 
 
 
 
 
  Welcome to Bottleshow.com. This website is a forum for antique bottle collectors, dealers, diggers, traders and anybody with an interest in old bottles. Today's technology allows collectors to experience the excitement of a bottle show from the comforts of home. This electronic forum allows a buyer the opportunity to purchase quality bottles, flasks and glass DIRECTLY from the seller.


As a dealer, you have the ability to manage your own table...add or delete items, modify descriptions, add pictures, and work directly with a buyer. Take advantage of Bottleshow.com's aggressive advertising campaigns to sell your items quickly to qualified buyers. As we progress with this program, feel free to email me with your thoughts or suggestions.

Please keep in mind that I have decided to invest all of my proceeds from this site back into the bottle community...by buying more bottles for my collection...I have to support my habit!

Thank you for your support,
Mike George
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ HISTORIC GLASS BOTTLE IDENTIFICATION & INFORMATION WEBSITE
SITE OF THE MONTH IS THE HISTORIC GLASS BOTTLE IDENTIFICATION & INFORMATION WEBSITE CREATED AND MANAGED BY BILL LINDSEY, ONE OF THE MOST INFORMATIVE SITES ON THE WEB IN RELATION TO OUR GREAT HOBBY, CLICK THE BOTTLE PICTURE BELOW TO VISIT. THANKS BILL.
 
 
 
 Website Goals
 
To enable the user to answer two primary questions about most utilitarian bottles and jars* produced in the United States (and Canada**) between the early 1800s and 1950s, as follows:
 
 
 

The above two questions also address what was succinctly articulated in the Intermountain Antiquities Computer System (IMACS) and the nominal purpose of this website, which is …to provide archaeologists with a manual for a standard approach to arriving at historical artifact function and chronology (University of Utah 1992).   This entire website is essentially a "key" - albeit a complex one - to the dating and typing (typology) of historic bottles.  In addition, this site also assists the user with these questions:

 
3. What technology, techniques, or processes were used to manufacture the bottle?
4. Where did the bottle come from, i.e., where was it made and/or used?
5. Where can I go for more information on historic bottles?

Since there were hundreds of thousands of uniquely different bottles produced in the United States (and Canada**) between 1800 and the 1950s, it is beyond the scope or even possibility of this or any website (or book) to provide specific details about more than just a tiny fraction of those bottles (Fike 1987).  This site instead attempts to help the user determine some key facts - approximate age & function - about any given bottle based on observable physical characteristics.  Hundreds of specific historic bottles are used as examples within the pages of this website to illustrate the concepts discussed; with luck you may find the specific bottle you have an interest in discussed though typically you will not.

This website is intended for
...

▪ Field archaeologists trying to identify and date bottles or bottle fragments which are found during cultural surveys and excavations in the United States;

▪ Educators dealing with the subject of historic archaeology; and
 
▪ Collectors and the general public trying to date a bottle, determine what it was used likely for, and/or begin their search for information dealing with the fascinating world of historic bottles.

 

This website created and managed by:
Bill Lindsey
Bureau of Land Management (retired) -
Klamath Falls, Oregon

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH ~ BRISTOL,TENN-VA COLLECTIBLE BOTTLES & HISTORY
                   
WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS FROM CHARLIE  BARNETTE AND IS A TREASURE TROVE OF INFORMATION AND PICTURES OF THE HISTORY OF BRISTOL VIRGINIA~TENNESSEE COMPILED BY CHARLIE. CLICK THE PICTURE AND CHECK OUT THIS VERY INFORMATIVE SITE. THANKS CHARLIE, GREAT STUFF
 
COMMENTS, PICTURES OR SUGGESTIONS
 
 
A pictorial history of collectible bottles and related "go-withs" from the Twin Cities of BRISTOL,TENN-VA.: containing - Whiskey , Patent Medicine, and Drug Store bottles from @ 1870 to 1920, plus the more "modern" bottles, such as: Soda and Milk up to about 1950,  and related go-withs & collectibles.
 
    I have also put together lists of known soda bottlers, druggists, medicine manufacturers, distillers, whiskey dealers, saloonists, & dairymen: their locations & known years of operation for not only Bristol ,but other locales as well.
    As additional information is learned, it will be added to the site.
   
        In an on-going effort to establish the historical significance of the preservation and researching of bottles in relation to their being important links to the people, prosperity, and growth of Bristol, biographical information about the business owners will also be provided, if known, or as it is revealed.  In some instances , a bottle may be the sole remaining evidence a company was even operating in the Bristol, Tenn-Va. area.
 
 Many of the men behind these "bottling" business ventures risked all in order to provide a service to their town and support their families....whether it be booze, soda, milk,  or medicinal products. You have to remember those were different times and all these businesses were both legitimate and in most cases honorable professions.
    
 My hope is this site will prove to be both useful and informative.
SITE OF THE MONTH ~ ANTIQUEBOTTLEHUNTER.COM

AntiqueBottleHunter.com ...Bottles Stoneware and Glass ...Header

 

 WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS FROM RICK "MEECH" BURCHFIELD AND FRIENDS AND HAS JUST BEEN MOVED AND AS ALWAYS UPDATED WITH MORE GREAT BOTTLE RELATED STUFF. BE SURE TO CHECK IT OUT AND SPEND SOME TIME GOING THROUGH ALL THE PAGES, THERE IS ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW AND INTERESTING TO CHECK OUT. 

AntiqueBottleHunter.com is our new site address. We have many more sites and improvements on the way shortly, so check back soon.

 

 --- ATTENTION ---

http://mysite.verizon.net/flaschenjager/bottles.html (- all mysite.verizon.net/flaschenjager pages -)
is no longer updated and will vanish soon.

 

An old grouping of early pattern-molded smelling bottles. --- AntiqueBottleHunter.com


Antique bottles - We dig, find, rescue, locate, research,study, preserve, donate, trade, display, sell and buy bottles.

Please contact us about purchasing your collection or singles.

 

We excavate - dig permission sites only. After securing permission, we locate and recover artifacts from areas such as: estates, property (commercial or residential), privies, wells, and dumps. We do this without damage to the property or artifacts and using the safest method possible. Please consider contacting us first if your site is available.

 

Serious diggers, if you are in the central Virginia area, and want to go bottle hunting (your permission site), or if you need help with your dig, contact us by the e-mail link below in advance.

Questions about your bottles or finds? Please go to any antique bottle forum listed on our links page.

 Go bottle and glass hunting when you can, if you can and always take with you large shovel loads of good luck.
Successful searches to all !

 

The 2011 RABCA October Show & Sale will be in our NEW LOCATION.


Our annual show will now be located at this address:
Chesterfield County Fairgrounds - 10300 Courthouse Road - Chesterfield, VA 23832-6615

 

Directions to Show: From Rt. 288: Take the Rt. 10 (Iron Bridge Rd.) East exit, towards the Chesterfield Courthouse complex. Turn left at the first light onto Courthouse Rd. (about 1/4 mile), beside the new courthouse. Go one mile to the show on the right, opposite L.C. Bird High School

 

 Copyright (c) 2000-2012 by FLASCHENJAGER.

SITE OF THE MONTH ~ ANTIQUE BOTTLES & INKS

 

 

 WEBSITE OF THE MONTH BELONGS TO ED AND LUCY FAULKNER AND CONTAINS GREAT INFORMATION ON ANYTHING INK BOTTLE RELATED, I HAVE USED THEIR SITE AS REFERENCE MANY TIMES AND THEIR TWO BOOKS ON INKS ARE CONSIDERED AMONG THE BEST. CLICK THE LINK AND CHECK IN ON THE FAULKNERS, YOU WON'T BE DISAPPOINTED

ANTIQUE BOTTLES & INKS

 

 Welcome to the bottle web site of Ed & Lucy Faulkner. My wife and I have been collecting antique bottles (mostly inks & related ephemera) for around 20 years and have thoroughly enjoyed the hobby and the people we have met along the way.

Many of these people we now count among our closest friends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figural:  Can include house inks, cabins, barrels and train engine shape or anything that is an identifiable figure. The house shape will have windows and doors embossed on it. 

The barrel will have a basic barrel shape.

 

 

 

 

Turtle:  Round flat body with a neck on one edge.                                                    Teakettle: Small, usually round or sided shape with a pour spout like a teakettle.

 

 

Cone: Small round bottle with smaller top than base.                                                                                                                                                         Igloo:  Smaller and taller than a turtle.

Early cones will be pontiled.                                                                                                                                                                                         

 

Umbrella: Small sided ink that is smaller at the top than base.  It can be 6, 8, 10, 12,

or more uncommon, 16 sided. Early umbrellas will be pontiled. 

 

 

SITE OF THE MONTH ~ ANTIQUE BOTTLES OF BALTIMORE
 
WEB SITE OF THE MONTH IS  OWNED AND MAINTAINED BY CHRIS ROWELL OF BALTIMORE MARYLAND AND HAS A MIX OF GREAT ARTICLES/DIG STORIES NOT TO MENTION SOME OF CHRIS'S INCREDIBLE BALTIMORE TORPEDOES ...OF WHICH I HAVE HAD THE HONOR OF RUNNING IN BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. BE SURE TO CLICK THE LINK AND SPEND SOME TIME BROWSING "ANTIQUE BOTTLES OF BALTIMORE" THERE ARE NO DISAPPOINTMENTS. THANKS CHRIS, GREAT SITE.
 
 
 
I'm Chris Rowell and I live in Baltimore Maryland. I collect Pontiled And Early Smooth Base Baltimore Mineral Waters, Sodas, Beers, Early Pottery Bottles, Pontiled And Early Smooth Based Baltimore Medicines, And Other High Quality Baltimore Bottles That I like. With my favorite type of bottles being the early colored torpedoes and ten pins from Baltimore. I also have an interest in early ceramics primarily redware and stoneware produced in Baltimore. I will try to showcase as much of my collection as possible on this site. I am also putting together a guide to early ceramics commonly found during privy digs. These ceramics are a very good tool for dating the context of the privy you are digging. And Show how many ceramic vessel's can be reconstructed from the shards found during privy digs. Also I will tell you about my many interesting Bottle Digging Experiences. I have dug over 1500 privies from Alexandria Virginia to New York and most major cities and towns in between. And I will try to offer help to other collectors by answering questions about bottle digging. Plus I will appraise any Baltimore bottles that other collectors have found. I have been collecting antique bottles for over 14 years now. And have been a hard core privy digger for the past 8 years. I dig at least one day every week and often more then once depending on availability of a good site and free time. I have dug some privies (outhouses) as old as the 1740`s. Also feel free to Sign my guest book your comments are always welcome. And If you live in a pre 1870 house in Baltimore City or any of the surrounding counties and would like to have any Privies, Wells, and Cisterns on your property located and excavated just e-mail me. Also check out my ever changing list of bottles for direct sale you may find the piece that you are looking for.   CONTACT CHRIS
 
 
 
 

Sunday March 29th 2009 Privy Dig


We have been digging quite a bit the past few weeks but most of the pits have totally sucked. But we keep at it anyway. Today it was Doug, Pat, and myself We started the day by driving around the east side of Baltimore Checking all the usual early spots looking for something we could get into. Then we started to wander across town. I remembered a small demolition site I had seen months before but sadly the 1870s buildings they knocked down had full basements destroying any privies on the site. Except for the slim chance of a small about 6 feet wide by 16 feet long strip of what could be dirt under a heavy concrete slab behind a basement foundation wall. last time I had been by the site this slab and wall were still in place and I had no idea if there was even dirt behind the wall or just more footers. Well we drove by the site and the wall had been removed. So Doug stopped and I jumped out and walked on the site and took one look at where the wall once was and could see what looked like original dirt and the unmistakable side of a brickliner slightly exposed. I ran back over to the truck and told Pat and Doug to park and grab tools we have a brickliner to dig. We pulled out the brick and started tunneling in and collapsing down the debris above the pit until we had the whole thing defined and the underside of the concrete slab that's over the pit exposed. We then started digging down. At about two feet into the pit we hit a very small loam layer this layer has dome early feather edge dating to the 1790s in it. We then knew this was going to be a very early privy. About 3 more feet down the sand fill gave way to about a 2 foot thick loam layer laden with 1780s artifacts that quickly dropped back to the 1770s and then by bottom the mid 1760s. Sadly everything in the pit was broken except a black glazed redware chamberpot but we also recovered 3 buckets of early ceramics to reconstruct. I really enjoy these early pits just for the ceramics. this pit was no exception with some very early creamware and some English and German saltglaze stoneware. And a piece of early Dutch Porcelain with a back mark that was dateable from 1764-1771. This was a cool pit to dig. More research will come over the summer when I have extra time. So check back.

SITE OF THE MONTH ~ ANTIQUE BOTTLE COLLECTORS HAVEN
 
 
 
 
 
 
ANTIQUE BOTTLE COLLECTORS HAVEN
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 WEB SITE OF THE MONTH IS OWNED AND MAINTAINED BY REGGIE LYNCH FROM NORTH CAROLINA. REGGIE IS A LONG TIME COLLECTOR LIKE MOST OF US AND HAS SOME GREAT BOTTLES EMBOSSED NORTH/SOUTH CAROLINA DISPENSARY AS WELL AS OTHER GREAT NORTH CAROLINA BOTTLES. I HAVE HAD THE HONOR OF SHARING ONE OF HIS RAREST CYLINDER SOUTH CAROLINA DISPENSARY BOTTLES AS BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. BE SURE TO CHECK OUT REGGIE'S SITE AS IT NEVER DISAPPOINTS AND IS A TREASURE TROVE OF GREAT INFORMATION. HERE IS A LINK   REGGIE'S SITE
 
 
 
 
NORTH CAROLINA DISPENSARY BOTTLES 
 Welcome to the leading educational Internet site for finding, buying, selling and learning about Antique Bottles! If you want to learn more about a particular category of bottle, or simply find out "how much is my old bottle worth?", then you've come to the right place.
 
In 1904, North Carolina allowed its people in each county to vote on the Volstead Act, which was similar to South Carolina which had gone to a dispensary system years earlier. Motivation was that men were getting their pay check on Friday and drinking it up in the bars/saloons before they got home. The Volstead Act allowed the people to vote on one of three things: 1) leave everything the way it was, 2) one central location in the city or the county to have a liquor store, and 3) do away with liquor and become a dry county. Some counties like Wake for one place - the Raleigh Dispensary. Johnson county voted for dispensaries in different towns like Selma, Smithfield, Clayton, and Pine Level. Cumberland county (Fayetteville) voted for a single county dispensary. Towns like Charlotte kept saloons.

Not sure when the dispensary system was done away with, but there are no known ABM NC dispensary bottles (i.e. all were BIM).

Alphabetical list of towns/counties in NC that had dispensary bottles: Catawba Valley, Clayton, Cumberland, Eureka, Fremont, Goldsboro (J.W. Edwards), Greenville, Henderson, Jackson, Kinston, Louisburg, Lucama, Pine Level, Raleigh, Roxboro, Seaboard, Selma, Smithfield, Statesville, Toisnot, Vanceboro, Warrenton, Waynesville, Wilson, Windsor, Winston.
Know of one not on the list? Let me know.

 
South Carolina Dispensary

The South Carolina Dispensary system was a state-run monopoly on liquor sales in the United States state of South Carolina which operated from 1893 to 1907 statewide and until 1916 in some counties. The system was the brainchild of Governor Benjamin Tillman, a farmer from Edgefield known as “Pitchfork Ben,” who served as governor from 1890-1894 and as a U.S. Senator from 1895 until his death in 1918. This interesting experiment had never before been tried at the state level, and proved to be the last time a state would require all liquor sold within its borders to be bottled and dispensed through state-run facilities.The South Carolina Dispensary system came to be known as “Ben Tillman’s Baby

 

The Dispensary in operation
 
The monopoly the state created was complete; wholesale and retail sales were controlled by the dispensary system through a state board of control, which consisted of the governor, comptroller general and attorney general. Day-to-day administration was in the hands of a state commissioner appointed by the governor. The commissioner was charged with procuring all liquors that were to be subsequently bottled by the state dispensary and sold to county dispensaries. Preference was to be given to local brewers and distillers. Liquor bottled by the state dispensary was the only liquor to be sold legally in South Carolina. From 1893 to 1900 the bottles used by the dispensary had an embossed design featuring a palmetto tree with crossed logs under the base of the trunk, and from 1900-1907 an overlaying and intertwining S, C and D “script” design replaced the tree design. This was largely because prohibitionists objected to having such a prominent state symbol as the palmetto tree embossed on liquor bottles. The script, or monogram design, remained on dispensary bottles until the end of the system in 1907.
 

 

 

End of the Dispensary
 
The corruption of the Dispensary as a political machine alarmed Progressive-era reformers, along with the church element that wanted complete prohibition. The General Assembly passed the Bryce law in 1904 that allowed for counties to choose whether they would allow for the sale of alcohol. Many of the Upstate counties voted to ban the sale of alcohol and it was not too long before the General Assembly discussed the viability of the Dispensary itself. In 1912, the Carey-Cothran law was passed that abolished the State Dispensary and provided for the establishment of dispensaries in every county that chose to remain wet.
 
The counties that operated dispensaries grew prosperous from the revenues generated by the sale of alcohol, but prohibitionist sentiment was irresistible and in 1915 the dry counties sought to end the sale of alcohol throughout the state. A referendum held in the state on the question of prohibition saw two-to-one support from the voters, and the General Assembly subsequently enacted a law in 1916 to ban the sale of alcohol and limit importation from other states.
 
 
 
 
Bottle varieties
 
For the most part, all that remains of the S.C. Dispensary are the (mostly empty) bottles that were made simply to contain alcoholic beverages to be sold and consumed, with no regard to the aesthetics of the bottle or design. The bottles are treasured by collectors not for their beauty of design or color, but more as a link to an intriguing era in history. Today, many bottle collectors enthusiastically seek S.C. Dispensary bottles, which have become fairly scarce in terms of common varieties. A few varieties are exceedingly rare and are worth many thousands of dollars to avid collectors willing to pay the price for them.
 
The most common type of S.C. Dispensary bottle is the “jo-jo” flask, which is a flask with flat panels front and back, rounded shoulders, and a rounding towards the base. These were made and used throughout the life of the dispensary system. Another type of flask, the union flask, was used until the turn of the century, and none were made with the monogram design. Unlike the jo-jo’s, which all bore the legend “SC Dispensary”, unions bore both this and “South Carolina Dispensary”. Half-pint, pint, and one quart cylindrical bottles were also made and used. Stoneware jugs in half-gallon and gallon sizes were also made, some made from clay with the palmetto tree and legend drawn by hand. There are other non-typical bottle types, and some bottles which were not embossed, being marked as a dispensary item by label only. A much sought after item is the two-ounce capacity souvenir commemorative dispensary bottle made for the South Carolina Interstate and West Indian Exposition in Charleston, S.C. which was held in 1901-1902. With different glass color varieties, glass manufacturers, and design nuances, there are many varieties of S.C. Dispensary bottles to be collected. Each S.C. Dispensary bottle is unique due to being blown in a mold by a glassblower, as the Owens AR automatic bottle-making machine was not yet in widespread use.
SITE OF THE MONTH ~ POISONOUS ADDICTION

 

 

 

THIS MONTHS SITE OF THE MONTH IS FROM STEPHEN AND DEB HAUSEUR, I COLLECTED POISONS FOR YEARS AND SO I CAN RELATE IN A BIG WAY WITH THEIR "ADDICTION " A GREAT SITE FROM SOME GREAT FOLKS. WHAT BETTER SITE FOR HALLOWEEN MONTH...BE SURE AND CHECK IT OUT AS IT IS NEVER A DISAPPOINTMENT

 We have been collecting bottles since early 2007. It all started from watching the Antique Bottles episode of Cash & Treasures on the Travel Channel. We both loved antiques, and she already had an old red glass collection (Anchor Hocking and the like) so this was right up our alley. The next morning, my wife was on the hunt to see what she could find online and broke into a wonderful world of old glass.

Now, we started without a single clue to what was out there, or what we would be interested in. We bought a few things, a soda here, a medicine there. We even bought a whole grouping of relatively common inks. Then we bought our first poison bottle. It was an English poison. But after browsing the poisons a bit, we decided this was the place for us. Being bikers, we both loved skulls, and there were plenty of skulls to be had in this arena of antique bottles. So it instantly appealed to us.



We researched for months afterwards on bottles we wanted, trying to get knowledge of their age and worth, until we realized we really needed books. We bought an antique bottle field guide (worthless), then the APBCA American Poison Bottle book (based on Rudy Kuhn’s Poison Bottle Workbooks) and then the first 2 Kuhn’s workbooks.
Fast forward to today. Our collection includes well over 100 bottles, mostly American poisons. We have a few English examples, but the American manufacturers had much more diversity in designs than our friends across the pond (let’s face it, you can only have so many variations of “Poisonous: Not To Be Taken” with vertical ribs on hexagon and rectangular bottles). We also have inks, medicines and a few other odds and ends (and of course, little room to put them).

We are always on the lookout for the next great bottle. So we have a section for items we are actively on the hunt for (or wish we could get). Please check that out. You may have something we want and may be wanting to sell, or you know where we can pick it up.

Thank you for dropping by and all the best to you and your bottle digging/collecting endeavors.

Stephen and Debbie POISONOUS ADDICTION

 

SITE OF THE MONTH ~ FEDERATION OF HISTORICAL BOTTLE COLLECTORS

SITE OF THE MONTH IS THE FOHBC WEBSITE, WHAT A GREAT JOB THEY DO WITH THIS SITE AND ALL THE INFORMATION AND MEMBER PERKS ARE UNMATCHED. ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW AND INTERESTING TO CHECK OUT, SO BE SURE TO CLICK ON ONE OF THE LINKS BELOW AND BOOKMARK AS YOU WILL WANT TO CHECK BACK OFTEN.

 

The Federation of Historical Bottle Collectors (FOHBC) is a non-profit organization supporting collectors of historical bottles, flasks, jars and related items.

Who We Are Art


 

The mission of the Federation is to encourage growth and public awareness of the bottle hobby and to enhance the enjoyment of such through collecting, dealing and educational endeavors and to promote fair and ethical conduct within the bottle hobby. To effect its mission, activities of the Federation include, but are not limited to:

 

1.   Furnishing photographic slide programs, speakers, and educational material to both individuals and bottle clubs.

2.   Encouraging and promoting the writing of research articles relating to bottles, their manufacture, origin, and history.

3.   Encouraging and promoting educational bottle displays at public libraries, schools, club meetings, antique shows and service organizations’ meetings.

4.   Encouraging and promoting the establishment of bottle clubs as they relate to bottle collecting in general as well as to areas of specialization and research.

5.   Encouraging and promoting the educational quality of bottle club newsletter publications.

6.   Establishing mutually beneficial relationships with and educational displays or programs at public museums in order to promote the bottle hobby.

7.   Maintaining and publishing a quality periodical for the dissemination of educational information and Federation news to the Federation membership in a timely manner.

8.   Honoring significant contributions or service by individuals to the bottle hobby by the recognition of such through induction into the Federation Hall of Fame or the Federation Honor Roll alliances.

9.   Establishing and abiding by standards and ethics by which bottle collectors and dealers may fairly deal with one another.

 


 FOHBC Virtual Museum of American Historical Bottles and Glass


The Concept Presentation to the FOHBC Board for the FOHBC Virtual Museum of American Historical Bottles and Glass occurred prior to the 2010 Baltimore Antique Bottle Show.

The presentation was developed by Ferdinand and Elizabeth Meyer. The concept was approved for Design Development.

Work sessions and administrative teams are being assembled for the various galleries, exhibitions and other museum areas such as membership, foundation, advertising, gift shop, research, archives etc.          VIRTUAL MUSEUM

 

 

SITE OF THE MONTH ~ THE MANHATTAN WELL DIGGERS

WEBSITE OF THE MONTH IS FELLOW NEW YORKERS MANHATTAN WELL DIGGERS. I HAVE BEEN FORTUNATE ENOUGH TO RUN A FEW OF THEIR GREAT FINDS IN BOTTLE OF THE WEEK. A WELL DONE SITE WITH LOTS OF GREAT DIG AND FINDS PICTURES AND THEY DO FIND SOME GREAT GLASS. BE SURE TO CHECK OUT THEIR SITE, I ASSURE YOU THAT YOU WILL ENJOY THE GREAT STORIES AND FINDS.  

MANHATTAN WELL DIGGERS

"A dedicated group of historical contractors, researchers, educators, artists and New York City mongo enthusiasts who have an ongoing passion for salvaging and unearthing antique bottles and artifacts on private property here in New York City, and sometimes further afield. In the manner that it is practiced, Historical Digging is neither garbology nor treasure hunting but a parallel field; it does not claim to be conventional archaeology. It is a niche pursuit in its own right, and an avocation for some. Depending on ever-present time and terrain constraints, one which involves various aspects of researching, locating and excavating techniques. Along with the inherent challenges and obstacles associated with this type of salvage work one of the main focuses is to locate dwellings being renovated dating from the mid 19th century. Buildings which were built without the luxury of modern plumbing and therefore most likely have a subterranean privy vault somewhere on the original property (see Privy digging). These vaults (loosely referred to as "wells" here in New York City and generally made of fieldstone, schist, brownstone or red brick, though varying considerably in width, depth, volume, contents and location and so on) sometimes contain pottery shards and other interesting objects which were thrown or dropped into the opening in the ground under the privy-shed. These backyard latrines routinely doubled as de facto trash holes for discarding garbage, including broken or damaged kitchen and tableware items, an abundance of clam shells, oyster shells and everyday food bones, occasionally porcelain doll parts, a child's tea set pieces, clay and stone marbles, pipes for tobacco smoking, etc. From time to time they also contain a seemingly endless assortment of mostly common old bottles. Many rarer or more valuable bottles were taken back to the seller for a return deposit (not unlike today) and recycled to avoid the high cost of reproducing them from scratch.
Nearly all trash holes accessed today are slated for demolition. Additionally, in most cases their original contents (the once active night soil layers) were removed completely, before anyone shows up to investigate. This activity took place (for the last time) around the end of the 19th century, when many homes received indoor or modern plumbing. The emptying and refilling process, which is referred to as "privy dipping" and so on, oftentimes went mercilessly to the bottom of the vault. The hole would be systematically emptied and then refilled with fresher or less offensive material, such as ashes from a nearby factory and/or an admixture of dirt, rocks and brickbats and then sealed off permanently. While eliminating the reeking night soil deposits from many years of use, this standard practice had a cruel tendency of damaging, destroying or removing all the intact bottles and other items as well. Simply put, the contents of any given privy, along with refuse from other sources, were taken to a landfill, nearby swampy area or bog, roadbed, riverside, etc., dumped and covered over. Massive quantities of waste materials were processed and used as fertilizer (see Jamaica Bay: A History, particularly the sections regarding early recycling, etc., at Barren Island).
In addition to privy-vaults (wells) we also dig out cisterns and excavate in bottle dumps and landfills whenever possible. The latter a fleeting, elusive source which requires remarkable persistence and precise timing but one which can occasionally contain rarer or scarcer bottles, depending on the specific area being worked. Moreover, during the decades worth of inevitable neighborhood renovations and assorted developments everywhere, many noteworthy discoveries were assiduously retrieved by the dedicated pioneers of this onerous pastime. The countless contributions of these de facto scholars is inestimable (see Steamboat Arabia Photo Gallery). In fact, a large percentage of 'publicly accessible' salvaged bottles and related items to date, were wrought back into conscious existence via the unpaid hands of these so-called tyros; from a more conventional perspective is the Historic Glass Bottle Identification & Information Website, developed and maintained by the Bureau of Land Management, it is a scholarly resource for essentially anything bottle related and is open to the public.
 

  By the 1970s and still today, avid bottle digging, bottle collecting and glassmaking research clubs, magazines and newsletters were hard at work everywhere. Collectively, an historically meaningful and substantive body of their members' work has been available to the general public for decades. At their own expense for the most part, they are responsible for recording, cataloging and publishing otherwise unavailable material pertaining to countless historical and aesthetic discoveries. These commendable grassroots organizations have been instrumental in helping establish bottle & glass museums (see National Bottle Museum), maintaining historic sites and been directly responsible for erecting numerous historical markers and producing ongoing educational materials of a generally high quality. While it is worth mentioning that only a small percentage of all collectable trash from the mid 19th century has ever been found, nearly all potential digging spots are invisible, totally non-obvious and generally inaccessible. However, from two decades of ongoing experience and many worthwhile historical investigations along the way, there's always plenty of exceptions to that general rule just waiting to be unearthed. Ironically, it can be construction, demolition and excavation projects which temporarily reveal good dumps, landfills and even privies containing historically consequential and sometimes monetarily significant antique bottles, to the industrious and persistent, or just plain fortunate, reclaimant today. "

 

 

SITE OF THE MONTH ~PEACHRIDGEGLASS.COM

THE SITE OF THE MONTH IS OWNED AND PRESENTED BY FERDINAND AND ELIZABETH MEYER WITH THE HOPE OF SHARING THEIR PASSION FOR COLLECTING AND DEALING IN EARLY AMERICAN BOTTLES AND GLASS. TAKE A FEW MINUTES,ACTUALLY SET ASIDE MORE THAN A FEW MINUTES AND VISIT THEIR GREAT SITE AND FEAST YOUR EYES ON A PROFESSIONALLY PHOTOGRAPHED AND NOTHING LESS THAN JAW DROPPING IMPRESSIVE COLLECTION OF BOTTLES,INSULATORS AND GLASS. THANK YOU FOR ALLOWING ME TO SHARE YOUR AMAZING COLLECTION AND SITE WITH EVERYONE.

 

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